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Dates
1870
1900
circa 1870-1900
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Treatment, General
Nursing
Accession Number
016001001
Description
White oval ceramic pap boat shaped invalid feeder decorated with deep blue one piece floral transfer with gilding around perimeter of top opening and spout; transfer print is raised; single open handle on back with spout pointing straight ahead; without manufacturers marks; some design overlap on b…
  1 image  
Accession Number
016001001
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Treatment, General
Nursing
MeSH Heading
Feeding Methods
Home Health Nursing
MM= Anesthesia, Inhalation -- accessories
MM= Feeding Dish
Nursing Care -- instrumentation
Description
White oval ceramic pap boat shaped invalid feeder decorated with deep blue one piece floral transfer with gilding around perimeter of top opening and spout; transfer print is raised; single open handle on back with spout pointing straight ahead; without manufacturers marks; some design overlap on base; spout opening is part of body.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and Alice Roeder.
Dates
1870
1900
circa 1870-1900
Date Remarks
Research
Material
ceramic: white
ink: blue, gold
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1
Length
16.5 cm
Width
6.1 cm
Height
5.3 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Base shows minor cracking under glaze; gold trim is missing in some aras and worn
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Documents
Book
eBook
Internet
Reference Comments
Allison, Eileen Michael. Ceramic Invalid Feeders, Pap Boats, and Baby Bottles of the 19th & Twentieth Century. Canada: E. M. Allison, 1997.
Donor file
Research Facts
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and sister Alice Roeder, a retired nurse. The collection consists of various eras and types of invalid / infant feeders, infant milk bottles, medicine spoons, urinals and reference material.
Invalid feeders’ also known as sick cups are designed to provide liquid or semi solid nourishment in time of illness or incapacity. There are many different shapes for invalid feeders. Some of the shapes are defined as infant or invalid feeders, however it seems that each manufacture used both terms interchangeably depending on the market they are targeting.
Images
Less detail
Dates
1930
1960
circa 1930-1960
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Treatment, General
Nursing
Accession Number
016001002
Description
White oval ceramic pap boat shaped invalid feeder decorated with hand painted deep blue Delft decoration in the 'onion' pattern with gilt trim along opening, one side of handle edge and a pair of lines from opening to spout; single open handle on back with spout pointing straight ahead; without man…
  1 image  
Accession Number
016001002
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Treatment, General
Nursing
MeSH Heading
Feeding Methods
Home Health Nursing
MM= Anesthesia, Inhalation -- accessories
MM= Feeding Dish
Nursing Care -- instrumentation
Description
White oval ceramic pap boat shaped invalid feeder decorated with hand painted deep blue Delft decoration in the 'onion' pattern with gilt trim along opening, one side of handle edge and a pair of lines from opening to spout; single open handle on back with spout pointing straight ahead; without manufacturers marks; spout opening is part of body; unglazed base.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and Alice Roeder.
Dates
1930
1960
circa 1930-1960
Date Remarks
Research
Material
ceramic: white
ink: blue
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1
Length
18.3 cm
Width
7.2 cm
Height
6.0 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Handle previously broken off and repaired; 2.7 cm crack under glaze at edge of opening
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Documents
Book
eBook
Internet
Reference Comments
Allison, Eileen Michael. Ceramic Invalid Feeders, Pap Boats, and Baby Bottles of the 19th & Twentieth Century. Canada: E.M. Allison, 1997.
Campbell, Gordon. The Grove Encyclopedia of Decorative Arts. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2006. 2006. Accessed August 18, 2016. http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780195189483.001.0001/acref-9780195189483
Patelisova, Helena. "The Layers of a Blue Onion." 3NTA. April 25, 2015. Accessed August 19, 2016. http://www.3nta.com/the-layers-of-a-blue-onion/.
Donor file
Research Facts
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and sister Alice Roeder who was a nurse. The large collection was made up of invalid feeders, hot water bottles, eye washers, bedpans, and female urinals.
Invalid feeders were made for both infants and adults. Originally sold for home health care purposes, they were ornately decorated and gilded, often with transfer prints and gilding. Many of these transfer prints were cheaper to produce and became popular in the 19th century. The most common color is blue, and often the same transfer print patterns can be found on popular dinner sets. All prints were applied to the feeders prior to glazing. These transfer patterns were often not shape specific. The results of general print patterns are overlapping areas or areas where a pattern that was split is showing to accommodate the shape of the feeder. Plain invalid feeders were often white and produced for home health care for the poor. By the late 19th and early 20th century, painting ceramics became a popular pastime for women in United States of America, and England. This influence produced a resurgence in hand painted invalid feeders, and popularity in plain white ceramic feeders. Many of the plain feeders were painted in homes or establishments, and once completed sent back to the manufacturer for firing. These are often identified because of the shade of blue is different and less bright than the shade used in print pattern transfers. The invalid feeders produced after the 19th century that were plain mark the shift of the invalid feeder to a more utilitarian purpose for professional use by nurses in hospitals. There were many manufacturers of invalid feeders marketing similar products for babies and adults. These manufactures would sometimes mark the feeder with a logo, the shape number, pattern number, and where it was made.
There are many different shapes for invalid feeders. Some of the shapes are defined as infant or invalid feeders, however it seems that each manufacture used both terms interchangeably. The boat shaped, which looks very similar to a gravy boat, originally evolved from the pap boat shape. It has a straight spout, main opening in the top, and an open handle in the back.
The design, like other medical ceramic ware, was decorated in the popular Blue Onion or Strawflower designs. The origins of this popular pattern originated from high quality Chinese porcelain decorated in cobalt designs. This tradition of blue and white porcelain dates back to the 8th and 9th centuries. When the wealthy Dutch and European merchants began exporting these wares back to Europe, the Meissen Porcelain Manufacturer began producing inspired blue ware called “onion china”. Many other manufacturers followed suit to produce the highly popular design, and the name evolved to blue onion. Each manufacturer had its own variation of the blue onion design. The original Chinese design was actually a floral design with pomegranates and peaches. These designs were so popular on all types ceramic and porcelain ware, that manufacturers produced transfer pattern outlines to reduce production time.
Majority of the invalid boat feeders produced in the 19th century were ceramic. Ceramics in an ambiguous term as it can signify an artefact made out of multiple kinds of clay, and different firing techniques. Ceramic can also be used to signify clay ware that has been fired at temperatures less then 500 °C. One of the many types of ceramic ware that falls under this umbrella term is porcelain. The term porcelain is incorrectly used interchangeably with ceramics. Porcelain ware is from fine white clay, it is characteristically fired below 1300 °C, and is translucent. In addition, to appearance it is generally very hard, durable, and makes a distinct ringing noise when tapped. Like the term ceramics, there are types of artefacts that fall under the term porcelain, such as fine china and bone china.
Invalid feeders are designed to provide liquid or semi solid nourishment in time of illness or incapacity. There are many different shapes for invalid feeders. Some of the shapes are defined as infant or invalid feeders, however it seems that each manufacture used both terms interchangeably. The boat shaped, which looks very similar to a gravy boat, originally evolved from the pap boat shape. It has a straight spout, main opening in the top, and an open handle in the back. This is also known as an infant feeder prior to the development of baby milk bottles. Manufacturers would market this item as both invalid and infant feeders depending on the market they are targeting.
Images
Less detail
Dates
1940
1980
circa 1940-1980
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Treatment, General
Nursing
Accession Number
016001003
Description
White oval ceramic pap boat shaped invalid feeder decorated with hand painted deep blue Delft decoration in the 'onion' pattern; open handle on back with spout pointing straight ahead; without manufacturers marks; spout opening is part of body; unglazed base.
  1 image  
Accession Number
016001003
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Treatment, General
Nursing
MeSH Heading
Feeding Methods
Home Health Nursing
MM= Anesthesia, Inhalation -- accessories
MM= Feeding Dish
Nursing Care -- instrumentation
Description
White oval ceramic pap boat shaped invalid feeder decorated with hand painted deep blue Delft decoration in the 'onion' pattern; open handle on back with spout pointing straight ahead; without manufacturers marks; spout opening is part of body; unglazed base.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and Alice Roeder.
Dates
1940
1980
circa 1940-1980
Date Remarks
Research
Material
ceramic: white
ink: blue, gold
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1
Length
18.0 cm
Width
7.2 cm
Height
6.6 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Minor crack on left side from base to opening
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Documents
Book
eBook
Internet
Reference Comments
Allison, Eileen Michael. Ceramic Invalid Feeders, Pap Boats, and Baby Bottles of the 19th & Twentieth Century. Canada: E.M. Allison, 1997.
Campbell, Gordon. The Grove Encyclopedia of Decorative Arts. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2006. 2006. Accessed August 18, 2016. http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780195189483.001.0001/acref-9780195189483
Patelisova, Helena. "The Layers of a Blue Onion." 3NTA. April 25, 2015. Accessed August 19, 2016. http://www.3nta.com/the-layers-of-a-blue-onion/.
Donor file
Research Facts
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and sister Alice Roeder who was a nurse. The large collection was made up of invalid feeders, hot water bottles, eye washers, bedpans, and female urinals.
Invalid feeders were made for both infants and adults. Originally sold for home health care purposes, they were ornately decorated and gilded, often with transfer prints and gilding. Many of these transfer prints were cheaper to produce and became popular in the 19th century. The most common color is blue, and often the same transfer print patterns can be found on popular dinner sets. All prints were applied to the feeders prior to glazing. These transfer patterns were often not shape specific. The results of general print patterns are overlapping areas or areas where a pattern that was split is showing to accommodate the shape of the feeder. Plain invalid feeders were often white and produced for home health care for the poor. By the late 19th and early 20th century, painting ceramics became a popular pastime for women in United States of America, and England. This influence produced a resurgence in hand painted invalid feeders, and popularity in plain white ceramic feeders. Many of the plain feeders were painted in homes or establishments, and once completed sent back to the manufacturer for firing. These are often identified because of the shade of blue is different and less bright than the shade used in print pattern transfers. The invalid feeders produced after the 19th century that were plain mark the shift of the invalid feeder to a more utilitarian purpose for professional use by nurses in hospitals. There were many manufacturers of invalid feeders marketing similar products for babies and adults. These manufactures would sometimes mark the feeder with a logo, the shape number, pattern number, and where it was made.
There are many different shapes for invalid feeders. Some of the shapes are defined as infant or invalid feeders, however it seems that each manufacture used both terms interchangeably. The boat shaped, which looks very similar to a gravy boat, originally evolved from the pap boat shape. It has a straight spout, main opening in the top, and an open handle in the back.
The design, like other medical ceramic ware, was decorated in the popular Blue Onion or Strawflower designs. The origins of this popular pattern originated from high quality Chinese porcelain decorated in cobalt designs. This tradition of blue and white porcelain dates back to the 8th and 9th centuries. When the wealthy Dutch and European merchants began exporting these wares back to Europe, the Meissen Porcelain Manufacturer began producing inspired blue ware called “onion china”. Many other manufacturers followed suit to produce the highly popular design, and the name evolved to blue onion. Each manufacturer had its own variation of the blue onion design. The original Chinese design was actually a floral design with pomegranates and peaches. These designs were so popular on all types ceramic and porcelain ware, that manufacturers produced transfer pattern outlines to reduce production time.
Majority of the invalid boat feeders produced in the 19th century were ceramic. Ceramics in an ambiguous term as it can signify an artefact made out of multiple kinds of clay, and different firing techniques. Ceramic can also be used to signify clay ware that has been fired at temperatures less then 500 °C. One of the many types of ceramic ware that falls under this umbrella term is porcelain. The term porcelain is incorrectly used interchangeably with ceramics. Porcelain ware is from fine white clay, it is characteristically fired below 1300 °C, and is translucent. In addition, to appearance it is generally very hard, durable, and makes a distinct ringing noise when tapped. Like the term ceramics, there are types of artefacts that fall under the term porcelain, such as fine china and bone china.
Invalid feeders are designed to provide liquid or semi solid nourishment in time of illness or incapacity. There are many different shapes for invalid feeders. Some of the shapes are defined as infant or invalid feeders, however it seems that each manufacture used both terms interchangeably. The boat shaped, which looks very similar to a gravy boat, originally evolved from the pap boat shape. It has a straight spout, main opening in the top, and an open handle in the back. This is also known as an infant feeder prior to the development of baby milk bottles. Manufacturers would market this item as both invalid and infant feeders depending on the market they are targeting.
Images
Less detail
Dates
1930
1950
circa 1930-1950
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Treatment, General
Nursing
Accession Number
016001004
Description
White oval ceramic pap boat shaped invalid feeder decorated with transfer print of white cross in red circle outlined twice in black with gilt trim along opening, edge of handle and spout; open handle with two raised bumps on back with spout pointing straight ahead; without manufacturers marks; spo…
  1 image  
Accession Number
016001004
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Treatment, General
Nursing
MeSH Heading
Feeding Methods
Home Health Nursing
MM= Anesthesia, Inhalation -- accessories
MM= Feeding Dish
Nursing Care -- instrumentation
Description
White oval ceramic pap boat shaped invalid feeder decorated with transfer print of white cross in red circle outlined twice in black with gilt trim along opening, edge of handle and spout; open handle with two raised bumps on back with spout pointing straight ahead; without manufacturers marks; spout opening is part of body; glazed base, model 103
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and Alice Roeder.
Dates
1930
1950
circa 1930-1950
Date Remarks
Research
Material
ceramic: white
ink: red, gold, black
Inscriptions
"103"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1
Length
17.3 cm
Width
7.0 cm
Height
6.8 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
At base under spout missing minor piece
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Documents
Book
eBook
Internet
Reference Comments
Allison, Eileen Michael. Ceramic Invalid Feeders, Pap Boats, and Baby Bottles of the 19th & Twentieth Century. Canada: E.M. Allison, 1997.
Campbell, Gordon. The Grove Encyclopedia of Decorative Arts. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2006. 2006. Accessed August 18, 2016. http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780195189483.001.0001/acref-9780195189483
Donor file
Research Facts
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and sister Alice Roeder, a retired nurse. The collection consists of various eras and types of invalid / infant feeders, infant milk bottles, medicine spoons, urinals and reference material.
The 1864 Geneva Convention marked the advent of the red cross as the symbol of impartial medical relief during wartimes and disasters. It was chosen as the Swiss flag in opposite colors to commemorate the Swiss advocate for the institution of this impartial aid and relief, Jean Henri Dunant. This popular symbol seems to have been superimposed on top of the glaze of many feeders after they were fired. One suggestion is that this meant that these were plain, utilitarian feeders were being repurposed for war times, or for hospitals in times of need. In addition, these could be home painted decorative additions to feeders that were meant to be donated as part of charity missions in the early 20th century.
Invalid feeders are designed to provide liquid or semi solid nourishment in time of illness or incapacity. There are many different shapes for invalid feeders. Some of the shapes are defined as infant or invalid feeders, however it seems that each manufacture used both terms interchangeably. The boat shaped, which looks very similar to a gravy boat, originally evolved from the pap boat shape. It has a straight spout, main opening in the top, and an open handle in the back. This is also known as an infant feeder prior to the development of baby milk bottles. Manufacturers would market this item as both invalid and infant feeders depending on the market they are targeting.
Images
Less detail
Dates
1930
1950
circa 1930-1950
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Treatment, General
Nursing
Accession Number
016001005
Description
White oval ceramic pap boat shaped invalid feeder decorated with transfer print of white cross in red circle outlined twice in black with gilt trim along opening, edge of handle and spout; open handle with two raised bumps on back with spout pointing straight ahead; without manufacturers marks; spo…
  1 image  
Accession Number
016001005
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Treatment, General
Nursing
MeSH Heading
Feeding Methods
Home Health Nursing
MM= Anesthesia, Inhalation -- accessories
MM= Feeding Dish
Nursing Care -- instrumentation
Description
White oval ceramic pap boat shaped invalid feeder decorated with transfer print of white cross in red circle outlined twice in black with gilt trim along opening, edge of handle and spout; open handle with two raised bumps on back with spout pointing straight ahead; without manufacturers marks; spout opening is part of body; glazed base, model 103.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and Alice Roeder.
Dates
1930
1950
circa 1930-1950
Date Remarks
Research
Material
ceramic: white
ink: red, black, gold
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1
Length
16.9 cm
Width
6.8 cm
Height
6.8 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Gilding partially worn around opening and spout
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Documents
Book
eBook
Internet
Reference Comments
Allison, Eileen Michael. Ceramic Invalid Feeders, Pap Boats, and Baby Bottles of the 19th & Twentieth Century. Canada: E.M. Allison, 1997.
Campbell, Gordon. The Grove Encyclopedia of Decorative Arts. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2006. 2006. Accessed August 18, 2016. http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780195189483.001.0001/acref-9780195189483
Donor file
Research Facts
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and sister Alice Roeder, a retired nurse. The collection consists of various eras and types of invalid / infant feeders, infant milk bottles, medicine spoons, urinals and reference material.
The 1864 Geneva Convention marked the advent of the red cross as the symbol of impartial medical relief during wartimes and disasters. It was chosen as the Swiss flag in opposite colors to commemorate the Swiss advocate for the institution of this impartial aid and relief, Jean Henri Dunant. This popular symbol seems to have been superimposed on top of the glaze of many feeders after they were fired. One suggestion is that this meant that these were plain, utilitarian feeders were being repurposed for war times, or for hospitals in times of need. In addition, these could be home painted decorative additions to feeders that were meant to be donated as part of charity missions in the early 20th century.
Invalid feeders are designed to provide liquid or semi solid nourishment in time of illness or incapacity. There are many different shapes for invalid feeders. Some of the shapes are defined as infant or invalid feeders, however it seems that each manufacture used both terms interchangeably. The boat shaped, which looks very similar to a gravy boat, originally evolved from the pap boat shape. It has a straight spout, main opening in the top, and an open handle in the back. This is also known as an infant feeder prior to the development of baby milk bottles. Manufacturers would market this item as both invalid and infant feeders depending on the market they are targeting.
Images
Less detail
Dates
1910
1920
circa 1910-1920
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Treatment, General
Nursing
Accession Number
016001006
Description
White oval ceramic pap boat shaped invalid feeder with hand painted decorated of red cross near spout with gilt trim along opening, edge of handle and spout; open handle with two raised bumps on back with spout pointing straight ahead; without manufacturers marks; spout opening is part of body; par…
  1 image  
Accession Number
016001006
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Treatment, General
Nursing
MeSH Heading
Feeding Methods
Home Health Nursing
MM= Anesthesia, Inhalation -- accessories
MM= Feeding Dish
Nursing Care -- instrumentation
Description
White oval ceramic pap boat shaped invalid feeder with hand painted decorated of red cross near spout with gilt trim along opening, edge of handle and spout; open handle with two raised bumps on back with spout pointing straight ahead; without manufacturers marks; spout opening is part of body; partially glazed base.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and Alice Roeder.
Dates
1910
1920
circa 1910-1920
Date Remarks
Research
Material
ceramic: white
ink: red, gold
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1
Temporary Location
With MHC Education Program WWI: The Dirty Details of Disease Oct 2017, stored in Rm 2017.
Length
14.2 cm
Width
6.0 cm
Height
4.8 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Gilding partially worn, small minor crack on left side opening
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Documents
Book
eBook
Internet
Reference Comments
Allison, Eileen Michael. Ceramic Invalid Feeders, Pap Boats, and Baby Bottles of the 19th & Twentieth Century. Canada: E.M. Allison, 1997.
Campbell, Gordon. The Grove Encyclopedia of Decorative Arts. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2006. 2006. Accessed August 18, 2016. http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780195189483.001.0001/acref-9780195189483
Donor file
Research Facts
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and sister Alice Roeder, a retired nurse. The collection consists of various eras and types of invalid / infant feeders, infant milk bottles, medicine spoons, urinals and reference material.
The 1864 Geneva Convention marked the advent of the red cross as the symbol of impartial medical relief during wartimes and disasters. It was chosen as the Swiss flag in opposite colors to commemorate the Swiss advocate for the institution of this impartial aid and relief, Jean Henri Dunant. This popular symbol seems to have been superimposed on top of the glaze of many feeders after they were fired. One suggestion is that this meant that these were plain, utilitarian feeders were being repurposed for war times, or for hospitals in times of need. In addition, these could be home painted decorative additions to feeders that were meant to be donated as part of charity missions in the early 20th century.
Invalid feeders are designed to provide liquid or semi solid nourishment in time of illness or incapacity. There are many different shapes for invalid feeders. Some of the shapes are defined as infant or invalid feeders, however it seems that each manufacture used both terms interchangeably. The boat shaped, which looks very similar to a gravy boat, originally evolved from the pap boat shape. It has a straight spout, main opening in the top, and an open handle in the back. This is also known as an infant feeder prior to the development of baby milk bottles. Manufacturers would market this item as both invalid and infant feeders depending on the market they are targeting.
Images
Less detail
Dates
1890
1930
circa 1890-1930
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Treatment, General
Nursing
Accession Number
016001007
Description
White oval ceramic pap boat shaped invalid feeder hand painted floral design in pink band with brown and red over it on upper section with gilt trim along opening, edge of handle, base edge, under pink band and spout; open handle with two raised bumps on back with spout pointing straight ahead; wit…
  1 image  
Accession Number
016001007
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Treatment, General
Nursing
MeSH Heading
Feeding Methods
Home Health Nursing
MM= Anesthesia, Inhalation -- accessories
MM= Feeding Dish
Nursing Care -- instrumentation
Description
White oval ceramic pap boat shaped invalid feeder hand painted floral design in pink band with brown and red over it on upper section with gilt trim along opening, edge of handle, base edge, under pink band and spout; open handle with two raised bumps on back with spout pointing straight ahead; without manufacturers marks; spout opening is part of body; un glazed base.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and Alice Roeder.
Dates
1890
1930
circa 1890-1930
Date Remarks
Research
Material
ceramic: white
paint: pink, brown, blue, red
ink: gold
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1
Length
15.8 cm
Width
6.6 cm
Height
5.8 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Gilding worn in all areas; handle with repaired break on right side
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Documents
Book
eBook
Internet
Reference Comments
Allison, Eileen Michael. Ceramic Invalid Feeders, Pap Boats, and Baby Bottles of the 19th & Twentieth Century. Canada: E.M. Allison, 1997.
Campbell, Gordon. The Grove Encyclopedia of Decorative Arts. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2006. 2006. Accessed August 18, 2016. http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780195189483.001.0001/acref-9780195189483
Donor file
Research Facts
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and sister Alice Roeder, a retired nurse. The collection consists of various eras and types of invalid / infant feeders, infant milk bottles, medicine spoons, urinals and reference material.
Invalid feeders are designed to provide liquid or semi solid nourishment in time of illness or incapacity. There are many different shapes for invalid feeders. Some of the shapes are defined as infant or invalid feeders, however it seems that each manufacture used both terms interchangeably. The boat shaped, which looks very similar to a gravy boat, originally evolved from the pap boat shape. It has a straight spout, main opening in the top, and an open handle in the back. This is also known as an infant feeder prior to the development of baby milk bottles. Manufacturers would market this item as both invalid and infant feeders depending on the market they are targeting.
Images
Less detail
Dates
1880
1920
circa 1880-1920
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Treatment, General
Nursing
Accession Number
016001008
Description
White oval ceramic pap boat shaped invalid feeder hand painted floral design in green and orange along spout area with gilt trim along opening, middle of handle and spout; embossed floral design at spout area; open handle with flat raised piece on top with spout pointing straight ahead; without man…
  1 image  
Accession Number
016001008
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Treatment, General
Nursing
MeSH Heading
Feeding Methods
Home Health Nursing
MM= Anesthesia, Inhalation -- accessories
MM= Feeding Dish
Nursing Care -- instrumentation
Description
White oval ceramic pap boat shaped invalid feeder hand painted floral design in green and orange along spout area with gilt trim along opening, middle of handle and spout; embossed floral design at spout area; open handle with flat raised piece on top with spout pointing straight ahead; without manufacturers marks; small opening; spout opening is part of body; glazed base.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and Alice Roeder.
Dates
1880
1920
circa 1880-1920
Date Remarks
Research
Material
ceramic: white
paint: green, orange, tan
ink: gold
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1
Length
14.5 cm
Width
6.5 cm
Height
7.3 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Gilding worn
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Documents
Book
eBook
Internet
Reference Comments
Allison, Eileen Michael. Ceramic Invalid Feeders, Pap Boats, and Baby Bottles of the 19th & Twentieth Century. Canada: E.M. Allison, 1997.
Campbell, Gordon. The Grove Encyclopedia of Decorative Arts. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2006. 2006. Accessed August 18, 2016. http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780195189483.001.0001/acref-9780195189483
Donor file
Research Facts
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and sister Alice Roeder, a retired nurse. The collection consists of various eras and types of invalid / infant feeders, infant milk bottles, medicine spoons, urinals and reference material.
Invalid feeders are designed to provide liquid or semi solid nourishment in time of illness or incapacity. There are many different shapes for invalid feeders. Some of the shapes are defined as infant or invalid feeders, however it seems that each manufacture used both terms interchangeably. The boat shaped, which looks very similar to a gravy boat, originally evolved from the pap boat shape. It has a straight spout, main opening in the top, and an open handle in the back. This is also known as an infant feeder prior to the development of baby milk bottles. Manufacturers would market this item as both invalid and infant feeders depending on the market they are targeting.
Images
Less detail
Dates
1960
1980
circa 1960-1980
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Treatment, General
Nursing
Accession Number
016001009
Description
White oval ceramic pap boat shaped invalid feeder hand painted floral in brown and blue with gilt trim along opening, middle of handle and spout; open handle with two raised bumps on back with spout pointing straight ahead; large oval top opening; without manufacturers marks; spout opening is part …
  1 image  
Accession Number
016001009
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Treatment, General
Nursing
MeSH Heading
Feeding Methods
Home Health Nursing
MM= Anesthesia, Inhalation -- accessories
MM= Feeding Dish
Nursing Care -- instrumentation
Description
White oval ceramic pap boat shaped invalid feeder hand painted floral in brown and blue with gilt trim along opening, middle of handle and spout; open handle with two raised bumps on back with spout pointing straight ahead; large oval top opening; without manufacturers marks; spout opening is part of body; glazed base
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and Alice Roeder.
Dates
1960
1980
circa 1960-1980
Date Remarks
Research
Material
ceramic: white
paint: brown, blue, yellow, black
Inscriptions
"136 / 929"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1
Length
15.2 cm
Width
6.0 cm
Height
5.6 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Gilding with minor wear
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Documents
Book
eBook
Internet
Reference Comments
Allison, Eileen Michael. Ceramic Invalid Feeders, Pap Boats, and Baby Bottles of the 19th & Twentieth Century. Canada: E.M. Allison, 1997.
Campbell, Gordon. The Grove Encyclopedia of Decorative Arts. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2006. 2006. Accessed August 18, 2016. http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780195189483.001.0001/acref-9780195189483
Donor file
Research Facts
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and sister Alice Roeder, a retired nurse. The collection consists of various eras and types of invalid / infant feeders, infant milk bottles, medicine spoons, urinals and reference material.
Invalid feeders are designed to provide liquid or semi solid nourishment in time of illness or incapacity. There are many different shapes for invalid feeders. Some of the shapes are defined as infant or invalid feeders, however it seems that each manufacture used both terms interchangeably. The boat shaped, which looks very similar to a gravy boat, originally evolved from the pap boat shape. It has a straight spout, main opening in the top, and an open handle in the back. This is also known as an infant feeder prior to the development of baby milk bottles. Manufacturers would market this item as both invalid and infant feeders depending on the market they are targeting.
Images
Less detail
Dates
1880
1900
circa 1880-1900
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Treatment, General
Nursing
Accession Number
016001010
Description
White oval ceramic pap boat shaped invalid feeder decorated with transfer print of pink, yellow and green floral design over spray pained pale blue areas; body with embossed design similar to wicker basket; with gilt trim along opening, center of handle and spout; open handle with two raised bumps …
  1 image  
Accession Number
016001010
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Treatment, General
Nursing
MeSH Heading
Feeding Methods
Home Health Nursing
MM= Anesthesia, Inhalation -- accessories
MM= Feeding Dish
Nursing Care -- instrumentation
Description
White oval ceramic pap boat shaped invalid feeder decorated with transfer print of pink, yellow and green floral design over spray pained pale blue areas; body with embossed design similar to wicker basket; with gilt trim along opening, center of handle and spout; open handle with two raised bumps on back with spout pointing straight ahead; without manufacturers marks; spout opening is part of body; unglazed base.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and Alice Roeder.
Dates
1880
1900
circa 1880-1900
Date Remarks
Research
Material
ceramic: white
ink: blue, pink, green, gold
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1
Length
15.4 cm
Width
5.9 cm
Height
5.4 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Gilding with minor wear
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Documents
Book
eBook
Internet
Reference Comments
Allison, Eileen Michael. Ceramic Invalid Feeders, Pap Boats, and Baby Bottles of the 19th & Twentieth Century. Canada: E.M. Allison, 1997.
Campbell, Gordon. The Grove Encyclopedia of Decorative Arts. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2006. 2006. Accessed August 18, 2016. http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780195189483.001.0001/acref-9780195189483
Donor file
Research Facts
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and sister Alice Roeder, a retired nurse. The collection consists of various eras and types of invalid / infant feeders, infant milk bottles, medicine spoons, urinals and reference material.
Invalid feeders are designed to provide liquid or semi solid nourishment in time of illness or incapacity. There are many different shapes for invalid feeders. Some of the shapes are defined as infant or invalid feeders, however it seems that each manufacture used both terms interchangeably. The boat shaped, which looks very similar to a gravy boat, originally evolved from the pap boat shape. It has a straight spout, main opening in the top, and an open handle in the back. This is also known as an infant feeder prior to the development of baby milk bottles. Manufacturers would market this item as both invalid and infant feeders depending on the market they are targeting.
Images
Less detail

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