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The Famous 'Twist' by the famous Doctor Williamsburg, Ont. [photograph postcard]

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact2521
Dates
1920
1940
circa 1920-1940
Collection
Dr. Michael A. Chiong Patent Medicine Collection
Category
Archival Items
Classification
Archival, Images
Treatment, General
Accession Number
996001484
Description
Cardboard postcard, unused, of Dr. M. W. Locke performing his "twist"; old photograph, overexposed, but faintly black and white, although more brown than either; shows him sitting with patient's foot on his knee; people behind watch; glossy picture on which message is handwritten.
  2 images  
Accession Number
996001484
Collection
Dr. Michael A. Chiong Patent Medicine Collection
Category
Archival Items
Classification
Archival, Images
Treatment, General
MeSH Heading
Physicians -- portraits
Rehabilitation
Description
Cardboard postcard, unused, of Dr. M. W. Locke performing his "twist"; old photograph, overexposed, but faintly black and white, although more brown than either; shows him sitting with patient's foot on his knee; people behind watch; glossy picture on which message is handwritten.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Purchased by Dr. M. Chiong for his patent medicine collection, before July 15, 1995
Site Made (Country)
Belgium
Dates
1920
1940
circa 1920-1940
Material
paper: black; white; brown
Inscriptions
Front: "THE FAMOUS 'TWIST' BY THE FAMOUS // DOCTOR - WILLIAMSBURG ONT. // - COPYRIGHTS RESERVED"; back: "Post Card // PRINTED IN BELGIUM // CORRESPONDENCE ADDRESS"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 2005
2005-5-6
Binder A
Dimension Notes
Length: 13.8 cm. x Width: 8.9 cm.
Condition Remarks
Front: the picture is just a bad picture; right edge, middle, some marking; left top corner slightly bent; press marks are all over the front where it has been scratched or bent, etc.; back: staining in middle and aging, especially left side
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Book
Other
Reference Comments
Jonathan Walford's Blog; "Doctor M.W. Locke and the Williamsburg Scene" by J. Smyth Carter, 1933; "The Canadian Magazine", Feb. 1933: "Dr. Locke - Patients Sing Praises - Medical Interests Scoff"
Research Facts
Dr. Mahlon W. Locke (1880-1942) born in, Dixon's Corners Ontario. Started high school at 12; great grandfather was John McIntosh, discoverer of the McIntosh Red Apple tree. In 1901 he enrolled at Queens College of Medicine, graduating in 1905. In 1907 he decided to undertake postgraduate training in Scotland, spending time at both the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh and the Faculty of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow. Opened his medical practice in Williamsburg June 1, 1908; married Miss Blanche McGruer and had 4 children.
On his return to Williamsburg, he treated the village blacksmith who was crippled with arthritis and was almost unable to work. After many sessions of Dr Locke’s foot manipulations, he regained much of his mobility and was able to return to his work. This seems to be the first recorded treatment and the one which would set the scene for Locke’s future reputation.
Interested in arthritis, which he believed was caused principally by fallen arches caused arthritis and other ills; he put the arches back in place by manual manipulation of their feet, relieving pressure on the posterior tibial nerve. Dr Locke’s fee was one dollar which included two sessions daily; everybody paid the same, whether millionaire or pauper. Those who were unable to pay were treated free. His one dollar per visit treatments included advice on taking exercise, wearing properly fitted shoes with orthotic supports, and prescriptions for associated ailments, such as hypothyroidism.
Around 1925 interest in his foot treatment grew rapidly with patients from all over North America, and some from Europe. By 1932 Dr Locke was giving over 2000 treatments daily. During the Depression years this enormous influx brought significant prosperity to the region. Large numbers of his patients claimed to be cured or relieved by this method and his reputation spread throughout North America and overseas.
In 1940 the top selling brand of health-footwear was ‘Lockewedge’, designed & approved by Dr. M.W. Locke as he felt ill-fitting shoes contributed to foot pains. This orthopedic shoe was made by The Perth Shoe Company in Canada.
Films of him working show that the manipulative procedure was rapid, lasting between 5 -7 seconds. Sometimes he would also manipulate the hands. On and on he would go, round and round in his swivel chair from foot to foot and hand to hand, having a break every few hours for a rest (or drink).
Dr Locke died February 6, 1942 from pneumonia. His brother-in law J. Alex Mc Gruer, a Chiropractor, carried on the practice, but it did not work out and it came to an end. The magic of Dr Locke was gone. Dr. Locke himself was largely forgotten, although he is remembered by some in the medical community as a pioneer in the field of reflexology.
Images
Less detail

Dr. M. W. Locke Williamsburg, Ont. [photograph postcard]

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact2522
Dates
1920
1940
circa 1920-1940
Collection
Dr. Michael A. Chiong Patent Medicine Collection
Category
Archival Items
Classification
Archival, Images
Treatment, General
Accession Number
996001485
Description
Cardboard postcard, unused; glossy picture of Dr. M.W. Locke; smiling, dressed in a suit with a wide diagonally-striped tie, with the outside of a house as a backdrop (barely seen); back: room for correspondence and address; picture on front is a little grainy and blurry; message on picture is hand…
  2 images  
Accession Number
996001485
Collection
Dr. Michael A. Chiong Patent Medicine Collection
Category
Archival Items
Classification
Archival, Images
Treatment, General
MeSH Heading
Physicians -- portraits
Rehabilitation
Description
Cardboard postcard, unused; glossy picture of Dr. M.W. Locke; smiling, dressed in a suit with a wide diagonally-striped tie, with the outside of a house as a backdrop (barely seen); back: room for correspondence and address; picture on front is a little grainy and blurry; message on picture is handwritten.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Purchased by Dr. M. Chiong for his patent medicine collection, before July 15, 1995.
Site Made (Country)
Belgium
Dates
1920
1940
circa 1920-1940
Material
paper: black; white
Inscriptions
Front: "Dr. M. W. LOCKE WILLIAMSBURG // COPYRIGHT RESVD. ONT."; back: "Post Card // PRINTED IN BELGIUM // CORRESPONDENCE ADDRESS"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 2005
2005-5-6
Binder A
Dimension Notes
Length: 14.0 cm. x Width: 8.8 cm.
Condition Remarks
Front: some indentation lines all over photograph; two marks at the top, one right, one left, and other white lines near the bottom -- may be part of the photograph; back very minimal sun / age discolouration
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Book
Other
Reference Comments
Jonathan Walford's Blog; "Doctor M.W. Locke and the Williamsburg Scene" by J. Smyth Carter, 1933; "The Canadian Magazine", Feb. 1933: "Dr. Locke - Patients Sing Praises - Medical Interests Scoff"
Research Facts
Dr. Mahlon W. Locke (1880-1942) born in, Dixon's Corners Ontario. Started high school at 12; great grandfather was John McIntosh, discoverer of the McIntosh Red Apple tree. In 1901 he enrolled at Queens College of Medicine, graduating in 1905. In 1907 he decided to undertake postgraduate training in Scotland, spending time at both the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh and the Faculty of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow. Opened his medical practice in Williamsburg June 1, 1908; married Miss Blanche McGruer and had 4 children.
On his return to Williamsburg, he treated the village blacksmith who was crippled with arthritis and was almost unable to work. After many sessions of Dr Locke’s foot manipulations, he regained much of his mobility and was able to return to his work. This seems to be the first recorded treatment and the one which would set the scene for Locke’s future reputation.
Interested in arthritis, which he believed was caused principally by fallen arches caused arthritis and other ills; he put the arches back in place by manual manipulation of their feet, relieving pressure on the posterior tibial nerve. Dr Locke’s fee was one dollar which included two sessions daily; everybody paid the same, whether millionaire or pauper. Those who were unable to pay were treated free. His one dollar per visit treatments included advice on taking exercise, wearing properly fitted shoes with orthotic supports, and prescriptions for associated ailments, such as hypothyroidism.
Around 1925 interest in his foot treatment grew rapidly with patients from all over North America, and some from Europe. By 1932 Dr Locke was giving over 2000 treatments daily. During the Depression years this enormous influx brought significant prosperity to the region. Large numbers of his patients claimed to be cured or relieved by this method and his reputation spread throughout North America and overseas.
In 1940 the top selling brand of health-footwear was ‘Lockewedge’, designed & approved by Dr. M.W. Locke as he felt ill-fitting shoes contributed to foot pains. This orthopedic shoe was made by The Perth Shoe Company in Canada.
Films of him working show that the manipulative procedure was rapid, lasting between 5 -7 seconds. Sometimes he would also manipulate the hands. On and on he would go, round and round in his swivel chair from foot to foot and hand to hand, having a break every few hours for a rest (or drink).
Dr Locke died February 6, 1942 from pneumonia. His brother-in law J. Alex Mc Gruer, a Chiropractor, carried on the practice, but it did not work out and it came to an end. The magic of Dr Locke was gone. Dr. Locke himself was largely forgotten, although he is remembered by some in the medical community as a pioneer in the field of reflexology.
Images
Less detail

A portrait study of Dr. M. W. Locke Williamsburg, Ont. [photograph postcard]

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact2523
Dates
1920
1940
circa 1920-1940
Collection
Dr. Michael A. Chiong Patent Medicine Collection
Category
Archival Items
Classification
Archival, Images
Treatment, General
Accession Number
996001486
Description
Cardboard postcard, unused; glossy portrait study of Dr. M. W. Locke; front: a posed Dr. Locke seated and half-turned, wearing a dark suit and vest in a room, presumably his house or office; picture is a little spotted, but otherwise very clear; message on picture handwritten.
  2 images  
Accession Number
996001486
Collection
Dr. Michael A. Chiong Patent Medicine Collection
Category
Archival Items
Classification
Archival, Images
Treatment, General
MeSH Heading
Physicians -- portraits
Rehabilitation
Description
Cardboard postcard, unused; glossy portrait study of Dr. M. W. Locke; front: a posed Dr. Locke seated and half-turned, wearing a dark suit and vest in a room, presumably his house or office; picture is a little spotted, but otherwise very clear; message on picture handwritten.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Purchased by Dr. M. Chiong for his patent medicine collection, before July 15, 1995.
Site Made (Country)
Belgium
Dates
1920
1940
circa 1920-1940
Material
paper: black; white
Inscriptions
Front: "A PORTRAIT STUDY OF - // Dr. M.W. LOCKE WILLIAMSBURG ONT. // COPYRIGHTS RESERVED"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 2005
2005-5-6
Binder A
Dimension Notes
Length: 14.0 cm. x Width: 8.8 cm.
Condition Remarks
Right top corner paper slightly peeled away; indentation marks and others where it appears some of the topmost layer has "eroded"; edges and corners are a little beaten and soft, and some dark spots are very visible in the top half of the picture; back: sun / age discoloured, but mainly around the bottom edge
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Book
Other
Reference Comments
Jonathan Walford's Blog; "Doctor M.W. Locke and the Williamsburg Scene" by J. Smyth Carter, 1933; "The Canadian Magazine", Feb. 1933: "Dr. Locke - Patients Sing Praises - Medical Interests Scoff"
Research Facts
Dr. Mahlon W. Locke (1880-1942) born in, Dixon's Corners Ontario. Started high school at 12; great grandfather was John McIntosh, discoverer of the McIntosh Red Apple tree. In 1901 he enrolled at Queens College of Medicine, graduating in 1905. In 1907 he decided to undertake postgraduate training in Scotland, spending time at both the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh and the Faculty of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow. Opened his medical practice in Williamsburg June 1, 1908; married Miss Blanche McGruer and had 4 children.
On his return to Williamsburg, he treated the village blacksmith who was crippled with arthritis and was almost unable to work. After many sessions of Dr Locke’s foot manipulations, he regained much of his mobility and was able to return to his work. This seems to be the first recorded treatment and the one which would set the scene for Locke’s future reputation.
Interested in arthritis, which he believed was caused principally by fallen arches caused arthritis and other ills; he put the arches back in place by manual manipulation of their feet, relieving pressure on the posterior tibial nerve. Dr Locke’s fee was one dollar which included two sessions daily; everybody paid the same, whether millionaire or pauper. Those who were unable to pay were treated free. His one dollar per visit treatments included advice on taking exercise, wearing properly fitted shoes with orthotic supports, and prescriptions for associated ailments, such as hypothyroidism.
Around 1925 interest in his foot treatment grew rapidly with patients from all over North America, and some from Europe. By 1932 Dr Locke was giving over 2000 treatments daily. During the Depression years this enormous influx brought significant prosperity to the region. Large numbers of his patients claimed to be cured or relieved by this method and his reputation spread throughout North America and overseas.
In 1940 the top selling brand of health-footwear was ‘Lockewedge’, designed & approved by Dr. M.W. Locke as he felt ill-fitting shoes contributed to foot pains. This orthopedic shoe was made by The Perth Shoe Company in Canada.
Films of him working show that the manipulative procedure was rapid, lasting between 5 -7 seconds. Sometimes he would also manipulate the hands. On and on he would go, round and round in his swivel chair from foot to foot and hand to hand, having a break every few hours for a rest (or drink).
Dr Locke died February 6, 1942 from pneumonia. His brother-in law J. Alex Mc Gruer, a Chiropractor, carried on the practice, but it did not work out and it came to an end. The magic of Dr Locke was gone. Dr. Locke himself was largely forgotten, although he is remembered by some in the medical community as a pioneer in the field of reflexology.
Images
Less detail

At the "Circle" platform in foreground where Dr. Locke works [photograph postcard]

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact2532
Dates
1920
1940
circa 1920-1940
Collection
Dr. Michael A. Chiong Patent Medicine Collection
Category
Archival Items
Classification
Archival, Images
Treatment, General
Accession Number
996001495
Description
Cardboard glossy picture postcard (unused), showing the "circle" where Dr. Locke worked, and a crowd of people coming to fill it up; houses / buildings in the background; message handwritten in white on photograph.
  2 images  
Accession Number
996001495
Collection
Dr. Michael A. Chiong Patent Medicine Collection
Category
Archival Items
Classification
Archival, Images
Treatment, General
MeSH Heading
Physicians -- portraits
Rehabilitation
Description
Cardboard glossy picture postcard (unused), showing the "circle" where Dr. Locke worked, and a crowd of people coming to fill it up; houses / buildings in the background; message handwritten in white on photograph.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Purchased by Dr. M. Chiong for his patent medicine collection, before July 15, 1995.
Site Made (Country)
Belgium
Dates
1920
1940
circa 1920-1940
Material
paper: black; white; grey
Inscriptions
Front: "AT THE "CIRCLE" - PLATFORM IN FOREGROUND WHERE // Dr. LOCKE WORKS. COPYRIGHT"; back: "Post Card // PRINTED IN BELGIUM // CORRESPONDENCE ADDRESS"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 2005
2005-5-6
Binder A
Dimension Notes
Length: 13.8 cm. x Width: 8.8 cm.
Condition Remarks
Some deterioration of the glossy finish, and small dot indentations are all over the picture; back is age / sun discoloured and edges are stained
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Book
Other
Reference Comments
Jonathan Walford's Blog; "Doctor M.W. Locke and the Williamsburg Scene" by J. Smyth Carter, 1933; "The Canadian Magazine", Feb. 1933: "Dr. Locke - Patients Sing Praises - Medical Interests Scoff"
Research Facts
Dr. Mahlon W. Locke (1880-1942) born in, Dixon's Corners Ontario. Started high school at 12; great grandfather was John McIntosh, discoverer of the McIntosh Red Apple tree. In 1901 he enrolled at Queens College of Medicine, graduating in 1905. In 1907 he decided to undertake postgraduate training in Scotland, spending time at both the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh and the Faculty of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow. Opened his medical practice in Williamsburg June 1, 1908; married Miss Blanche McGruer and had 4 children.
On his return to Williamsburg, he treated the village blacksmith who was crippled with arthritis and was almost unable to work. After many sessions of Dr Locke’s foot manipulations, he regained much of his mobility and was able to return to his work. This seems to be the first recorded treatment and the one which would set the scene for Locke’s future reputation.
Interested in arthritis, which he believed was caused principally by fallen arches caused arthritis and other ills; he put the arches back in place by manual manipulation of their feet, relieving pressure on the posterior tibial nerve. Dr Locke’s fee was one dollar which included two sessions daily; everybody paid the same, whether millionaire or pauper. Those who were unable to pay were treated free. His one dollar per visit treatments included advice on taking exercise, wearing properly fitted shoes with orthotic supports, and prescriptions for associated ailments, such as hypothyroidism.
Around 1925 interest in his foot treatment grew rapidly with patients from all over North America, and some from Europe. By 1932 Dr Locke was giving over 2000 treatments daily. During the Depression years this enormous influx brought significant prosperity to the region. Large numbers of his patients claimed to be cured or relieved by this method and his reputation spread throughout North America and overseas.
In 1940 the top selling brand of health-footwear was ‘Lockewedge’, designed & approved by Dr. M.W. Locke as he felt ill-fitting shoes contributed to foot pains. This orthopedic shoe was made by The Perth Shoe Company in Canada.
Films of him working show that the manipulative procedure was rapid, lasting between 5 -7 seconds. Sometimes he would also manipulate the hands. On and on he would go, round and round in his swivel chair from foot to foot and hand to hand, having a break every few hours for a rest (or drink).
Dr Locke died February 6, 1942 from pneumonia. His brother-in law J. Alex Mc Gruer, a Chiropractor, carried on the practice, but it did not work out and it came to an end. The magic of Dr Locke was gone. Dr. Locke himself was largely forgotten, although he is remembered by some in the medical community as a pioneer in the field of reflexology.
Images
Less detail

Waiting for treatment at the famous Dr. Locke Clinic Williamsburg, Ont. [photograph postcard]

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact2533
Dates
1920
1940
circa 1920-1940
Collection
Dr. Michael A. Chiong Patent Medicine Collection
Category
Archival Items
Classification
Archival, Images
Treatment, General
Accession Number
996001496
Description
Cardboard glossy picture postcard (unused), showing the "circle" where Dr. Locke worked, and the long line-up to it; has a canopy overhead to provide shade; message andwritten in white on photograph.
  2 images  
Accession Number
996001496
Collection
Dr. Michael A. Chiong Patent Medicine Collection
Category
Archival Items
Classification
Archival, Images
Treatment, General
MeSH Heading
Physicians -- portraits
Rehabilitation
Description
Cardboard glossy picture postcard (unused), showing the "circle" where Dr. Locke worked, and the long line-up to it; has a canopy overhead to provide shade; message andwritten in white on photograph.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Purchased by Dr. M. Chiong for his patent medicine collection, before July 15, 1995.
Site Made (Country)
Belgium
Dates
1920
1940
circa 1920-1940
Material
paper: black; white
Inscriptions
Front: "WAITING FOR TREATMENT AT // THE FAMOUS Dr. LOCKE CLINIC // WILLIAMSBURG ONT. // COPYRIGHT"; back: "Post Card // PRINTED IN BELGIUM // CORRESPONDENCE ADDRESS"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 2005
2005-5-6
Binder A
Dimension Notes
Length: 13.9 cm. x Width: 8.7 cm.
Condition Remarks
Some age/sun discolouration on the back, especially around the edges; corners are a little soft
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Book
Other
Reference Comments
Jonathan Walford's Blog; "Doctor M.W. Locke and the Williamsburg Scene" by J. Smyth Carter, 1933; "The Canadian Magazine", Feb. 1933: "Dr. Locke - Patients Sing Praises - Medical Interests Scoff"
Research Facts
Dr. Mahlon W. Locke (1880-1942) born in, Dixon's Corners Ontario. Started high school at 12; great grandfather was John McIntosh, discoverer of the McIntosh Red Apple tree. In 1901 he enrolled at Queens College of Medicine, graduating in 1905. In 1907 he decided to undertake postgraduate training in Scotland, spending time at both the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh and the Faculty of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow. Opened his medical practice in Williamsburg June 1, 1908; married Miss Blanche McGruer and had 4 children.
On his return to Williamsburg, he treated the village blacksmith who was crippled with arthritis and was almost unable to work. After many sessions of Dr Locke’s foot manipulations, he regained much of his mobility and was able to return to his work. This seems to be the first recorded treatment and the one which would set the scene for Locke’s future reputation.
Interested in arthritis, which he believed was caused principally by fallen arches caused arthritis and other ills; he put the arches back in place by manual manipulation of their feet, relieving pressure on the posterior tibial nerve. Dr Locke’s fee was one dollar which included two sessions daily; everybody paid the same, whether millionaire or pauper. Those who were unable to pay were treated free. His one dollar per visit treatments included advice on taking exercise, wearing properly fitted shoes with orthotic supports, and prescriptions for associated ailments, such as hypothyroidism.
Around 1925 interest in his foot treatment grew rapidly with patients from all over North America, and some from Europe. By 1932 Dr Locke was giving over 2000 treatments daily. During the Depression years this enormous influx brought significant prosperity to the region. Large numbers of his patients claimed to be cured or relieved by this method and his reputation spread throughout North America and overseas.
In 1940 the top selling brand of health-footwear was ‘Lockewedge’, designed & approved by Dr. M.W. Locke as he felt ill-fitting shoes contributed to foot pains. This orthopedic shoe was made by The Perth Shoe Company in Canada.
Films of him working show that the manipulative procedure was rapid, lasting between 5 -7 seconds. Sometimes he would also manipulate the hands. On and on he would go, round and round in his swivel chair from foot to foot and hand to hand, having a break every few hours for a rest (or drink).
Dr Locke died February 6, 1942 from pneumonia. His brother-in law J. Alex Mc Gruer, a Chiropractor, carried on the practice, but it did not work out and it came to an end. The magic of Dr Locke was gone. Dr. Locke himself was largely forgotten, although he is remembered by some in the medical community as a pioneer in the field of reflexology.
Images
Less detail

Beneath the canopy at Dr. Locke Clinic Williamsburg [photograph postcard]

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact2534
Dates
1940
circa 1920-1940
Collection
Dr. Michael A. Chiong Patent Medicine Collection
Category
Archival Items
Classification
Archival, Images
Treatment, General
Accession Number
996001497
Description
Cardboard glossy picture postcard (used), showing the "circle" where Dr. Locke worked, shaded by a canopy, with a large number of patients waiting to be treated; message handwritten in white on the photograph; 2 cent stamp
  2 images  
Accession Number
996001497
Collection
Dr. Michael A. Chiong Patent Medicine Collection
Category
Archival Items
Classification
Archival, Images
Treatment, General
MeSH Heading
Physicians -- portraits
Rehabilitation
Description
Cardboard glossy picture postcard (used), showing the "circle" where Dr. Locke worked, shaded by a canopy, with a large number of patients waiting to be treated; message handwritten in white on the photograph; 2 cent stamp
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Purchased by Dr. M. Chiong for his patent medicine collection, before July 15, 1995.
Site Made (Country)
Belgium
Dates
1940
circa 1920-1940
Material
paper: black; white; brown
Inscriptions
Front: "BENEATH THE // CANOPY AT Dr. LOCKE // CLINIC WILLIAMSBURG // COPYRIGHT ONT // 1933"; back: "Mrs. Newton Hunt [?] // 378 W Fourth St. // Elmira N.Y. // U.S.A. // Wed morning // A small view [?] // of clinic am // waiting for Geo' [?] // to take treatment // Love // Mrs. Baltz"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 2005
2005-5-6
Binder A
Dimension Notes
Length: 13.9 cm. x Width: 8.8 cm.
Condition Remarks
Glossy finish is slightly deteriorated around the edges; back: stained along top, and age / sun discoloured
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Book
Other
Reference Comments
Jonathan Walford's Blog; "Doctor M.W. Locke and the Williamsburg Scene" by J. Smyth Carter, 1933; "The Canadian Magazine", Feb. 1933: "Dr. Locke - Patients Sing Praises - Medical Interests Scoff"
Research Facts
Dr. Mahlon W. Locke (1880-1942) born in, Dixon's Corners Ontario. Started high school at 12; great grandfather was John McIntosh, discoverer of the McIntosh Red Apple tree. In 1901 he enrolled at Queens College of Medicine, graduating in 1905. In 1907 he decided to undertake postgraduate training in Scotland, spending time at both the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh and the Faculty of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow. Opened his medical practice in Williamsburg June 1, 1908; married Miss Blanche McGruer and had 4 children.
On his return to Williamsburg, he treated the village blacksmith who was crippled with arthritis and was almost unable to work. After many sessions of Dr Locke’s foot manipulations, he regained much of his mobility and was able to return to his work. This seems to be the first recorded treatment and the one which would set the scene for Locke’s future reputation.
Interested in arthritis, which he believed was caused principally by fallen arches caused arthritis and other ills; he put the arches back in place by manual manipulation of their feet, relieving pressure on the posterior tibial nerve. Dr Locke’s fee was one dollar which included two sessions daily; everybody paid the same, whether millionaire or pauper. Those who were unable to pay were treated free. His one dollar per visit treatments included advice on taking exercise, wearing properly fitted shoes with orthotic supports, and prescriptions for associated ailments, such as hypothyroidism.
Around 1925 interest in his foot treatment grew rapidly with patients from all over North America, and some from Europe. By 1932 Dr Locke was giving over 2000 treatments daily. During the Depression years this enormous influx brought significant prosperity to the region. Large numbers of his patients claimed to be cured or relieved by this method and his reputation spread throughout North America and overseas.
In 1940 the top selling brand of health-footwear was ‘Lockewedge’, designed & approved by Dr. M.W. Locke as he felt ill-fitting shoes contributed to foot pains. This orthopedic shoe was made by The Perth Shoe Company in Canada.
Films of him working show that the manipulative procedure was rapid, lasting between 5 -7 seconds. Sometimes he would also manipulate the hands. On and on he would go, round and round in his swivel chair from foot to foot and hand to hand, having a break every few hours for a rest (or drink).
Dr Locke died February 6, 1942 from pneumonia. His brother-in law J. Alex Mc Gruer, a Chiropractor, carried on the practice, but it did not work out and it came to an end. The magic of Dr Locke was gone. Dr. Locke himself was largely forgotten, although he is remembered by some in the medical community as a pioneer in the field of reflexology.
Images
Less detail

Looking east, toward Dr. Locke's office Williamsburg, Ont. [photograph postcard]

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact2535
Dates
1920
1940
circa 1920-1940
Collection
Dr. Michael A. Chiong Patent Medicine Collection
Category
Archival Items
Classification
Archival, Images
Treatment, General
Accession Number
996001498
Description
Cardboard glossy picture postcard (used), black & white, showing a large number of cars lined up to go to Dr. Locke's clinic; message handwritten in white on photograph; back: letter from Ethel to Mr. Weir; 2 cent stamp, post mark appears to be 1935, the 10th of some month; also, stamp of George V,…
  2 images  
Accession Number
996001498
Collection
Dr. Michael A. Chiong Patent Medicine Collection
Category
Archival Items
Classification
Archival, Images
Treatment, General
MeSH Heading
Physicians -- portraits
Rehabilitation
Description
Cardboard glossy picture postcard (used), black & white, showing a large number of cars lined up to go to Dr. Locke's clinic; message handwritten in white on photograph; back: letter from Ethel to Mr. Weir; 2 cent stamp, post mark appears to be 1935, the 10th of some month; also, stamp of George V, 1910-1936.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Purchased by Dr. M. Chiong for his patent medicine collection, before July 15, 1995.
Site Made (Country)
Belgium
Dates
1920
1940
circa 1920-1940
Material
paper: black; white; brown
Inscriptions
Front: "LOOKING EAST, TOWARD DR. LOCKE'S OFFICE WILLIAMSBURG ONT. (K)"; back: "Mr. Hugh Weir // 118 Hastings Pl., // Syracuse, N.Y. // U.S.A. // Sun. P.M. - Hello - // Helen & I just walked to town after nice supper. // It is now 8 P.M., hope // you are home now safe // & sound. Were you // starved? Not such a // crowd now, about 800. // Write soon // Lovingly, // Ethel. // X"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 2005
2005-5-6
Binder A
Dimension Notes
Length: 13.9 cm. x Width: 8.8 cm.
Condition Remarks
Some indentation marks; back: staining along the top edge, especially near the right side; some staining / ink smudging near the bottom
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Book
Other
Reference Comments
Jonathan Walford's Blog; "Doctor M.W. Locke and the Williamsburg Scene" by J. Smyth Carter, 1933; "The Canadian Magazine", Feb. 1933: "Dr. Locke - Patients Sing Praises - Medical Interests Scoff"
Research Facts
Dr. Mahlon W. Locke (1880-1942) born in, Dixon's Corners Ontario. Started high school at 12; great grandfather was John McIntosh, discoverer of the McIntosh Red Apple tree. In 1901 he enrolled at Queens College of Medicine, graduating in 1905. In 1907 he decided to undertake postgraduate training in Scotland, spending time at both the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh and the Faculty of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow. Opened his medical practice in Williamsburg June 1, 1908; married Miss Blanche McGruer and had 4 children.
On his return to Williamsburg, he treated the village blacksmith who was crippled with arthritis and was almost unable to work. After many sessions of Dr Locke’s foot manipulations, he regained much of his mobility and was able to return to his work. This seems to be the first recorded treatment and the one which would set the scene for Locke’s future reputation.
Interested in arthritis, which he believed was caused principally by fallen arches caused arthritis and other ills; he put the arches back in place by manual manipulation of their feet, relieving pressure on the posterior tibial nerve. Dr Locke’s fee was one dollar which included two sessions daily; everybody paid the same, whether millionaire or pauper. Those who were unable to pay were treated free. His one dollar per visit treatments included advice on taking exercise, wearing properly fitted shoes with orthotic supports, and prescriptions for associated ailments, such as hypothyroidism.
Around 1925 interest in his foot treatment grew rapidly with patients from all over North America, and some from Europe. By 1932 Dr Locke was giving over 2000 treatments daily. During the Depression years this enormous influx brought significant prosperity to the region. Large numbers of his patients claimed to be cured or relieved by this method and his reputation spread throughout North America and overseas.
In 1940 the top selling brand of health-footwear was ‘Lockewedge’, designed & approved by Dr. M.W. Locke as he felt ill-fitting shoes contributed to foot pains. This orthopedic shoe was made by The Perth Shoe Company in Canada.
Films of him working show that the manipulative procedure was rapid, lasting between 5 -7 seconds. Sometimes he would also manipulate the hands. On and on he would go, round and round in his swivel chair from foot to foot and hand to hand, having a break every few hours for a rest (or drink).
Dr Locke died February 6, 1942 from pneumonia. His brother-in law J. Alex Mc Gruer, a Chiropractor, carried on the practice, but it did not work out and it came to an end. The magic of Dr Locke was gone. Dr. Locke himself was largely forgotten, although he is remembered by some in the medical community as a pioneer in the field of reflexology.
Images
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Patients "Lined up" for treatment by Dr. Locke [photograph postcard]

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact2538
Dates
1920
1940
circa 1920-1940
Collection
Dr. Michael A. Chiong Patent Medicine Collection
Category
Archival Items
Classification
Archival, Images
Treatment, General
Accession Number
996001501
Description
Cardboard glossy black & white picture postcard (unused) showing patients of Dr. Locke lined up down the street in their wheelchairs; message handwritten in white on the photograph.
  2 images  
Accession Number
996001501
Collection
Dr. Michael A. Chiong Patent Medicine Collection
Category
Archival Items
Classification
Archival, Images
Treatment, General
MeSH Heading
Physicians -- portraits
Rehabilitation
Description
Cardboard glossy black & white picture postcard (unused) showing patients of Dr. Locke lined up down the street in their wheelchairs; message handwritten in white on the photograph.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Purchased by Dr. M. Chiong for his patent medicine collection, before July 15, 1995.
Site Made (Country)
Belgium
Dates
1920
1940
circa 1920-1940
Material
paper: black; white
Inscriptions
Front: "PATIENTS "LINED UP" FOR TREATMENT BY Dr. LOCKE // COPYRIGHT 1933"; back: "Post Card // PRINTED IN BELGIUM // CORRESPONDENCE ADDRESS"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 2005
2005-5-6
Binder A
Dimension Notes
Length: 13.8 cm. x Width: 8.8 cm.
Condition Remarks
Corners a little soft; back is slightly sun/age discoloured and dirty, particularly along the edges
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Book
Other
Reference Comments
Jonathan Walford's Blog; "Doctor M.W. Locke and the Williamsburg Scene" by J. Smyth Carter, 1933; "The Canadian Magazine", Feb. 1933: "Dr. Locke - Patients Sing Praises - Medical Interests Scoff"
Research Facts
Dr. Mahlon W. Locke (1880-1942) born in, Dixon's Corners Ontario. Started high school at 12; great grandfather was John McIntosh, discoverer of the McIntosh Red Apple tree. In 1901 he enrolled at Queens College of Medicine, graduating in 1905. In 1907 he decided to undertake postgraduate training in Scotland, spending time at both the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh and the Faculty of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow. Opened his medical practice in Williamsburg June 1, 1908; married Miss Blanche McGruer and had 4 children.
On his return to Williamsburg, he treated the village blacksmith who was crippled with arthritis and was almost unable to work. After many sessions of Dr Locke’s foot manipulations, he regained much of his mobility and was able to return to his work. This seems to be the first recorded treatment and the one which would set the scene for Locke’s future reputation.
Interested in arthritis, which he believed was caused principally by fallen arches caused arthritis and other ills; he put the arches back in place by manual manipulation of their feet, relieving pressure on the posterior tibial nerve. Dr Locke’s fee was one dollar which included two sessions daily; everybody paid the same, whether millionaire or pauper. Those who were unable to pay were treated free. His one dollar per visit treatments included advice on taking exercise, wearing properly fitted shoes with orthotic supports, and prescriptions for associated ailments, such as hypothyroidism.
Around 1925 interest in his foot treatment grew rapidly with patients from all over North America, and some from Europe. By 1932 Dr Locke was giving over 2000 treatments daily. During the Depression years this enormous influx brought significant prosperity to the region. Large numbers of his patients claimed to be cured or relieved by this method and his reputation spread throughout North America and overseas.
In 1940 the top selling brand of health-footwear was ‘Lockewedge’, designed & approved by Dr. M.W. Locke as he felt ill-fitting shoes contributed to foot pains. This orthopedic shoe was made by The Perth Shoe Company in Canada.
Films of him working show that the manipulative procedure was rapid, lasting between 5 -7 seconds. Sometimes he would also manipulate the hands. On and on he would go, round and round in his swivel chair from foot to foot and hand to hand, having a break every few hours for a rest (or drink).
Dr Locke died February 6, 1942 from pneumonia. His brother-in law J. Alex Mc Gruer, a Chiropractor, carried on the practice, but it did not work out and it came to an end. The magic of Dr Locke was gone. Dr. Locke himself was largely forgotten, although he is remembered by some in the medical community as a pioneer in the field of reflexology.
Images
Less detail

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