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mortar and pestle

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact12599
Collection
Dr. James V. Gallivan Collection
Category
Pharmacy and Drug Artifacts
Classification
Pharmacy, General
Accession Number
007024002 a-b
Description
Clear glass mortar (a) with a spout for pouring and a clear glass pestle (b) with a rounded glass handle.
  3 images  
Accession Number
007024002 a-b
Collection
Dr. James V. Gallivan Collection
Category
Pharmacy and Drug Artifacts
Classification
Pharmacy, General
Description
Clear glass mortar (a) with a spout for pouring and a clear glass pestle (b) with a rounded glass handle.
Number Of Parts
2
Part Names
a - mortar - Length 9.0 cm x Diam 13.1 cm
b - pestle - Length 11.3 cm x Diam 2.8 cm
Provenance
Owned by Dr. James V. Gallivan, donated to museum by his grand-daughter Anne MacDonald.
Material
glass: clear
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-A8-2
Condition Remarks
Mortar (a) shows minor grinding wear
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
File
JPG
Reference Comments
Remarks in donor file; CD #2
Research Facts
Dr. James V. Gallivan was a graduate of the Queen's University Medical School Class of 1904; he practiced medicine in Peterborough Ontario; he made his own foot powder, gargle and camphor ointment.
Images
Less detail
Collection
Dr. James V. Gallivan Collection
Category
Pharmacy and Drug Artifacts
Classification
Pharmacy, General
Accession Number
007024003 a-b
Description
Clear glass bottle (a) with painted metal screwcap (b); paper label describing the bottle's contents and manufacturer's information affixed to front of bottle; etched measurement markings in the glass on each side of bottle; contains some crystalized camphor.
  2 images  
Accession Number
007024003 a-b
Collection
Dr. James V. Gallivan Collection
Category
Pharmacy and Drug Artifacts
Classification
Pharmacy, General
MeSH Heading
Camphor
Drugs, Non-Prescription
MM= Drugs -- patent, proprietary, over-the-counter -- container
MM= Drug Packaging -- container -- bottle
Description
Clear glass bottle (a) with painted metal screwcap (b); paper label describing the bottle's contents and manufacturer's information affixed to front of bottle; etched measurement markings in the glass on each side of bottle; contains some crystalized camphor.
Number Of Parts
2
Part Names
a - bottle - Length 8.6 cm x Width 3.6 cm x Depth 2.2 cm
b - screwcap - Length 1.0 cm x Diam 1.8 cm
Provenance
Owned by Dr. James V. Gallivan, donated to museum by his grand-daughter Anne MacDonald.
Maker
McDermid & Jury
Site Made (City)
Peterborough
Site Made (State)
Ontario
Site Made (Country)
Canada
Material
glass: clear
paper: cream
ink: blue
paint: cream
Inscriptions
Printed on label on bottle (a): " Spts. Camphor // McDermid & Jury // PRESCRIPTION SPECIALISTS // COR. GEORGE & CHARLOTTE STS // PETERBORO."; etched in glass: "2 // CC"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-A4-7 Box 1 Row D
Temporary Location
On travelling exhibit ‘Unmasking Influenza’ Ottawa L-2019-3 30 April 2019-31 Dec 2022.
Condition Remarks
Screwcap shows some scratching; bottle label shows minor discoloration
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
File
JPG
Reference Comments
Remarks in donor file; CD #2
Research Facts
Dr. James V. Gallivan was a graduate of the Queen's University Medical School Class of 1904; he practiced medicine in Peterborough Ontario; made his own foot powder, gargle and camphor ointment.
Images
Less detail
Dates
1880
1913
circa 1880-1913
Collection
Alice L. Leavitt Collection
Category
Pharmacy and Drug Artifacts
Classification
Pharmacy, General
Home Health Care
Accession Number
010015003 a-b
Description
Amber glass bottle (a) with flat base and rounded square shaped body, tapering up into a cylindrical neck with a handle connecting the neck to the body; opposite the handle is a short spout which protrudes from just below the neck and stretches upwards, tapering into a small opening which curves st…
  5 images  
Accession Number
010015003 a-b
Collection
Alice L. Leavitt Collection
Category
Pharmacy and Drug Artifacts
Classification
Pharmacy, General
Home Health Care
MeSH Heading
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Food
Patient Care -- instrumentation
Description
Amber glass bottle (a) with flat base and rounded square shaped body, tapering up into a cylindrical neck with a handle connecting the neck to the body; opposite the handle is a short spout which protrudes from just below the neck and stretches upwards, tapering into a small opening which curves straight out towards the side; a wooden stopper (b) sits in the neck of the glass.
Number Of Parts
2
Part Names
a - bottle: Length 7.2 cm X Width 5.0 cm X Height 12.3 cm
b - stopper: Length 4.9 cm X Diameter 2.1 cm
Provenance
Owned by donor
Dates
1880
1913
circa 1880-1913
Date Remarks
Based on "A Dating Key For Post-Eighteenth Century Bottles" by T. Stell Newman.
Material
glass: amber
wood: brown
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-A5-6 Box 3 Row C
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Some bubbles inside the glass and potentially some minor chipping.
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Websites
Reference Comments
https://www.etymonline.com/word/cruet#etymonline_v_406
https://www.kovels.com/price-guide/glass-price-guide/amber-glass.html
https://www.airseacontainers.com/blog/the-science-behind-amber-glass-how-these-bottles-protect-liquids/
https://www.containerandpackaging.com/resources/colored-glass/
Research Facts
Olive oil was used in various pharmacy recipes for home use and at the pharmacists.
This type of bottle is called a cruet, and is most often used to hold vinegar, oil, or sacramental wine. The word "cruet" was first attested circa 1300, and most likely comes from the Old French "crue", meaning an earthen pot. Related to the word "crock".
Amber, the colour of this glass, was a popular colour for glass just after the American Civil War and during the 1930s-1950s, and is one of the many colours which are often cited when referring to "Depression Glass". Amber glass comes from iron, sulphur, and carbon being added to molten glass. Amber glass is good for protecting liquids, as it blocks UV light and other light wavelengths under 450 nm, which is why it is often used to store medicines, alcohols, and oils.
Images
Less detail