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veterinary bloodletting fleam

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact14379
Dates
1800
1830
circa 1800-1830
Collection
Dr. Martin T. Jeremias Collection
Category
Diagnostic & Treatment Artifacts
Classification
Treatment, General
Accession Number
004015004
Description
19th century English veterinary bloodletting instrument, folding fleam with three grey metal double-edged curved 7.7 cm. blades in graduating sizes that fold into a curved brass shield; blades rotate out to almost 360'; one blade has incised name of maker.
  2 images  
Accession Number
004015004
Collection
Dr. Martin T. Jeremias Collection
Category
Diagnostic & Treatment Artifacts
Classification
Treatment, General
MeSH Heading
Bloodletting -- instrumentation
Phlebotomy
Veterinary Medicine
Description
19th century English veterinary bloodletting instrument, folding fleam with three grey metal double-edged curved 7.7 cm. blades in graduating sizes that fold into a curved brass shield; blades rotate out to almost 360'; one blade has incised name of maker.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Donated by Dr. Martin T. Jeremias to the University of Alberta and its library; collection was then donated to the museum via Dr. Merrill Distad
Maker
G. GREGORY
Site Made (Country)
England
Dates
1800
1830
circa 1800-1830
Date Remarks
Date based on research
Material
metal: gold, grey
Inscriptions
Stamped on blade: "G. GREGORY"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D6-5
Length
7.8 cm
Width
2.7 cm
Depth
0.7 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Dimension Notes
measured when closed and at fullest point of shield
Condition Remarks
All blades are showing signs of black staining; visible scratches are present all over the object.
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Internet
Reference Comments
http://www.medicalantiques.com/medical/Scarifications_and_Bleeder_Medical_Antiques.htm; http://www.alllancets.com/Braspg2.html
Research Facts
The fleams used for veterinary purposes were placed over the jugular vein of the neck most commonly and inserted with the help of a fleam stick. This was a heavy wooden club used to drive the blade in with a quick motion (so the horse didn’t know what hit him).
Images
Less detail