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Portrait of Dr. Helen MacMurchy [portrait]

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact11791
Dates
1901
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Archival Items
Classification
Archival, Photograph
Accession Number
002050289
Description
A black and white photo of a woman, she is standing sideways but looking into the camera, she wears a dark coloured overcoat with silver buttons that run the length of the front of the jacket and appear on the sleeves as well, she is holding a rolled up paper in her hand, she wears a light coloured…
  2 images  
Accession Number
002050289
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Archival Items
Classification
Archival, Photograph
MeSH Heading
Physicians -- portraits
Description
A black and white photo of a woman, she is standing sideways but looking into the camera, she wears a dark coloured overcoat with silver buttons that run the length of the front of the jacket and appear on the sleeves as well, she is holding a rolled up paper in her hand, she wears a light coloured shirt and dark coloured hat, her eyes are light coloured and her dark-coloured hair is tied up under the hat.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Acquired from the Academy of Medicine.
Maker
Hunter & Co.
Site Made (City)
Toronto
Site Made (State)
Ontario
Site Made (Country)
Canada
Dates
1901
Date Remarks
Graduation date
Material
paper: cream
ink: black
Inscriptions
Printed on the front: "HUNTER & CO. TORONTO"; handwritten on the back: "Dr. Helen McMurchy // [illeg.] McMurchy // D. Oct. '53, age 91"; printed on the back: "Hunter & Co. // Artists // & // Photographers // 107 // King St West, // Toronto."
Permanent Location
Storage Room 2005
2005-5-7 Assorted Binder A, pg. 21 a
Length
10.5 cm
Width
6.3 cm
Condition Remarks
#1: Stable: On the front: slight soiling all over, slight fading of the photo, small tear on upper left edge; on the back: slight soiling.
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Internet
Reference Comments
http://famouscanadianwomen.com/famous%20firsts/medical%20professionals.htm
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helen_MacMurchy
Research Facts
Helen MacMurchy Born January 7, 1862. Died October 8, 1953. In 1901 Helen graduated with a medical degree from the University of Toronto and interned as the first woman doctor with the Toronto General Hospital. She went on to be the first woman doctor to do post graduate studies at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.A. In 1909 she conducted a survey of the high infant death rates experienced in cities at the turn of the century. In 1914 she wrote a popular book, 'A Little Talk About Baby'.
In 1915 she was appointed the inspector of the feeble minded in Ontario. Sadly her actions to persuade the government that eugenics was the answer to preventing degenerate babies led to the wrongful sterilization of many immigrants.
Helen was the first editor of the Canadian Nurses Journal. In 1920 she was placed in charge of the federal government’s new Division of Child Welfare and was responsible for the contents of some of the government published Blue Books with advice on caring for children. These little books were published in multiple languages including Cree.
It was in the 1920’s that she made a special study of medical inspection of schools, child welfare and public health in England and the United States.
In 1934 she was inducted as Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE). In 1949 she was named one of the leading women doctors in the western world. In 1997 she was declared a Person of National Historic Significance.
Images
Less detail

Dr. Locke treating patients, Williamsburg, Ont. [photograph postcard]

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact2519
Dates
1920
1940
circa 1920-1940
Collection
Dr. Michael A. Chiong Patent Medicine Collection
Category
Archival Items
Classification
Archival, Images
Treatment, General
Accession Number
996001482
Description
Cardboard postcard, used; photograph of Dr. M. W. Locke treating patients; very grainy black-and-white photograph of Dr. Locke with a "patient's" foot in his lap and a number of people watching behind; back contains a letter and a 2 cent stamp (Canadian); writing on picture printed.
  2 images  
Accession Number
996001482
Collection
Dr. Michael A. Chiong Patent Medicine Collection
Category
Archival Items
Classification
Archival, Images
Treatment, General
MeSH Heading
Physicians -- portraits
Rehabilitation
Description
Cardboard postcard, used; photograph of Dr. M. W. Locke treating patients; very grainy black-and-white photograph of Dr. Locke with a "patient's" foot in his lap and a number of people watching behind; back contains a letter and a 2 cent stamp (Canadian); writing on picture printed.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Purchased by Dr. M. Chiong for his patent medicine collection, before July 15, 1995
Maker
International Fine Art Co. Ltd.
Site Made (City)
Montreal
Site Made (State)
Quebec
Site Made (Country)
Canada
Dates
1920
1940
circa 1920-1940
Material
paper: black; white; purple
Inscriptions
Front: "Dr. Locke treating patients, Williamsburg, Ont."; back: "Mrs. J. Clifford // 616 Smith St. // Rochester N.Y. // Had a nice // trip, cloudy // all the way but // know rain // Lulu & Ella. // PRODUITS // BEAUX - ARTS // PRODUCTS // Published by International Fine Art Co. Ltd., Montreal, 2"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 2005
2005-5-6
Binder A
Dimension Notes
Length: 14.1 cm. x Width: 9.1 cm.
Condition Remarks
Edges are messy (notched/missing top coat); bend in the upper left quadrant (near edge); back: some staining, and some of the cardboard has come off the address along the word "Clifford"
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Book
Other
Reference Comments
Jonathan Walford's Blog; "Doctor M. W. Locke and the Williamsburg Scene" by J. Smyth Carter, 1933; "The Canadian Magazine", Feb. 1933: "Dr. Locke - Patients Sing Praises - Medical Interests Scoff"
Research Facts
Dr. Mahlon W. Locke (1880-1942) born in, Dixon's Corners Ontario. Started high school at 12; great grandfather was John McIntosh, discoverer of the McIntosh Red Apple tree. In 1901 he enrolled at Queens College of Medicine, graduating in 1905. In 1907 he decided to undertake postgraduate training in Scotland, spending time at both the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh and the Faculty of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow. Opened his medical practice in Williamsburg June 1, 1908; married Miss Blanche McGruer and had 4 children.
On his return to Williamsburg, he treated the village blacksmith who was crippled with arthritis and was almost unable to work. After many sessions of Dr Locke’s foot manipulations, he regained much of his mobility and was able to return to his work. This seems to be the first recorded treatment and the one which would set the scene for Locke’s future reputation.
Interested in arthritis, which he believed was caused principally by fallen arches caused arthritis and other ills; he put the arches back in place by manual manipulation of their feet, relieving pressure on the posterior tibial nerve. Dr Locke’s fee was one dollar which included two sessions daily; everybody paid the same, whether millionaire or pauper. Those who were unable to pay were treated free. His one dollar per visit treatments included advice on taking exercise, wearing properly fitted shoes with orthotic supports, and prescriptions for associated ailments, such as hypothyroidism.
Around 1925 interest in his foot treatment grew rapidly with patients from all over North America, and some from Europe. By 1932 Dr Locke was giving over 2000 treatments daily. During the Depression years this enormous influx brought significant prosperity to the region. Large numbers of his patients claimed to be cured or relieved by this method and his reputation spread throughout North America and overseas.
In 1940 the top selling brand of health-footwear was ‘Lockewedge’, designed & approved by Dr. M.W. Locke as he felt ill-fitting shoes contributed to foot pains. This orthopedic shoe was made by The Perth Shoe Company in Canada.
Films of him working show that the manipulative procedure was rapid, lasting between 5 -7 seconds. Sometimes he would also manipulate the hands. On and on he would go, round and round in his swivel chair from foot to foot and hand to hand, having a break every few hours for a rest (or drink).
Dr Locke died February 6, 1942 from pneumonia. His brother-in law J. Alex Mc Gruer, a Chiropractor, carried on the practice, but it did not work out and it came to an end. The magic of Dr Locke was gone. Dr. Locke himself was largely forgotten, although he is remembered by some in the medical community as a pioneer in the field of reflexology.
Images
Less detail

"Dr. M. W. Locke Williamsburg, Ont. [photograph postcard]

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact2520
Dates
1920
1940
circa 1920-1940
Collection
Dr. Michael A. Chiong Patent Medicine Collection
Category
Archival Items
Classification
Archival, Images
Treatment, General
Accession Number
996001483
Description
Cardboard postcard, unused, of Dr. M. W. Locke posing with his opened car door; black-and-white photograph; buildings and people in the background and a bush or hedge next to him; writing is hand-written; stamp of George V (1910-1936).
  2 images  
Accession Number
996001483
Collection
Dr. Michael A. Chiong Patent Medicine Collection
Category
Archival Items
Classification
Archival, Images
Treatment, General
MeSH Heading
Physicians -- portraits
Rehabilitation
Description
Cardboard postcard, unused, of Dr. M. W. Locke posing with his opened car door; black-and-white photograph; buildings and people in the background and a bush or hedge next to him; writing is hand-written; stamp of George V (1910-1936).
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Purchased by Dr. M. Chiong for his patent medicine collection, before July 15, 1995.
Site Made (Country)
Canada
Dates
1920
1940
circa 1920-1940
Material
paper: black; white; grey
Inscriptions
Front: "DR. M. W. LOCKE // WILLIAMSBURG ONT."; back: "POST CARD // MADE IN CANADA // CORRESPONDENCE // ADDRESS // PLACE STAMP HERE"; Ella. // PRODUITS // BEAUX - ARTS // PRODUCTS // Published by International Fine Art Co. Ltd.,"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 2005
2005-5-6
Binder A
Dimension Notes
Length: 13.9 cm. x Width: 8.9 cm.
Condition Remarks
Corners a little soft; back is very slightly age-discoloured/dirty
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Book
Other
Reference Comments
Jonathan Walford's Blog; "Doctor M.W. Locke and the Williamsburg Scene" by J. Smyth Carter, 1933; "The Canadian Magazine", Feb. 1933: "Dr. Locke - Patients Sing Praises - Medical Interests Scoff"
Research Facts
Dr. Mahlon W. Locke (1880-1942) born in, Dixon's Corners Ontario. Started high school at 12; great grandfather was John McIntosh, discoverer of the McIntosh Red Apple tree. In 1901 he enrolled at Queens College of Medicine, graduating in 1905. In 1907 he decided to undertake postgraduate training in Scotland, spending time at both the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh and the Faculty of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow. Opened his medical practice in Williamsburg June 1, 1908; married Miss Blanche McGruer and had 4 children.
On his return to Williamsburg, he treated the village blacksmith who was crippled with arthritis and was almost unable to work. After many sessions of Dr Locke’s foot manipulations, he regained much of his mobility and was able to return to his work. This seems to be the first recorded treatment and the one which would set the scene for Locke’s future reputation.
Interested in arthritis, which he believed was caused principally by fallen arches caused arthritis and other ills; he put the arches back in place by manual manipulation of their feet, relieving pressure on the posterior tibial nerve. Dr Locke’s fee was one dollar which included two sessions daily; everybody paid the same, whether millionaire or pauper. Those who were unable to pay were treated free. His one dollar per visit treatments included advice on taking exercise, wearing properly fitted shoes with orthotic supports, and prescriptions for associated ailments, such as hypothyroidism.
Around 1925 interest in his foot treatment grew rapidly with patients from all over North America, and some from Europe. By 1932 Dr Locke was giving over 2000 treatments daily. During the Depression years this enormous influx brought significant prosperity to the region. Large numbers of his patients claimed to be cured or relieved by this method and his reputation spread throughout North America and overseas.
In 1940 the top selling brand of health-footwear was ‘Lockewedge’, designed & approved by Dr. M.W. Locke as he felt ill-fitting shoes contributed to foot pains. This orthopedic shoe was made by The Perth Shoe Company in Canada.
Films of him working show that the manipulative procedure was rapid, lasting between 5 -7 seconds. Sometimes he would also manipulate the hands. On and on he would go, round and round in his swivel chair from foot to foot and hand to hand, having a break every few hours for a rest (or drink).
Dr Locke died February 6, 1942 from pneumonia. His brother-in law J. Alex Mc Gruer, a Chiropractor, carried on the practice, but it did not work out and it came to an end. The magic of Dr Locke was gone. Dr. Locke himself was largely forgotten, although he is remembered by some in the medical community as a pioneer in the field of reflexology.
Images
Less detail

The Famous 'Twist' by the famous Doctor Williamsburg, Ont. [photograph postcard]

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact2521
Dates
1920
1940
circa 1920-1940
Collection
Dr. Michael A. Chiong Patent Medicine Collection
Category
Archival Items
Classification
Archival, Images
Treatment, General
Accession Number
996001484
Description
Cardboard postcard, unused, of Dr. M. W. Locke performing his "twist"; old photograph, overexposed, but faintly black and white, although more brown than either; shows him sitting with patient's foot on his knee; people behind watch; glossy picture on which message is handwritten.
  2 images  
Accession Number
996001484
Collection
Dr. Michael A. Chiong Patent Medicine Collection
Category
Archival Items
Classification
Archival, Images
Treatment, General
MeSH Heading
Physicians -- portraits
Rehabilitation
Description
Cardboard postcard, unused, of Dr. M. W. Locke performing his "twist"; old photograph, overexposed, but faintly black and white, although more brown than either; shows him sitting with patient's foot on his knee; people behind watch; glossy picture on which message is handwritten.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Purchased by Dr. M. Chiong for his patent medicine collection, before July 15, 1995
Site Made (Country)
Belgium
Dates
1920
1940
circa 1920-1940
Material
paper: black; white; brown
Inscriptions
Front: "THE FAMOUS 'TWIST' BY THE FAMOUS // DOCTOR - WILLIAMSBURG ONT. // - COPYRIGHTS RESERVED"; back: "Post Card // PRINTED IN BELGIUM // CORRESPONDENCE ADDRESS"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 2005
2005-5-6
Binder A
Dimension Notes
Length: 13.8 cm. x Width: 8.9 cm.
Condition Remarks
Front: the picture is just a bad picture; right edge, middle, some marking; left top corner slightly bent; press marks are all over the front where it has been scratched or bent, etc.; back: staining in middle and aging, especially left side
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Book
Other
Reference Comments
Jonathan Walford's Blog; "Doctor M.W. Locke and the Williamsburg Scene" by J. Smyth Carter, 1933; "The Canadian Magazine", Feb. 1933: "Dr. Locke - Patients Sing Praises - Medical Interests Scoff"
Research Facts
Dr. Mahlon W. Locke (1880-1942) born in, Dixon's Corners Ontario. Started high school at 12; great grandfather was John McIntosh, discoverer of the McIntosh Red Apple tree. In 1901 he enrolled at Queens College of Medicine, graduating in 1905. In 1907 he decided to undertake postgraduate training in Scotland, spending time at both the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh and the Faculty of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow. Opened his medical practice in Williamsburg June 1, 1908; married Miss Blanche McGruer and had 4 children.
On his return to Williamsburg, he treated the village blacksmith who was crippled with arthritis and was almost unable to work. After many sessions of Dr Locke’s foot manipulations, he regained much of his mobility and was able to return to his work. This seems to be the first recorded treatment and the one which would set the scene for Locke’s future reputation.
Interested in arthritis, which he believed was caused principally by fallen arches caused arthritis and other ills; he put the arches back in place by manual manipulation of their feet, relieving pressure on the posterior tibial nerve. Dr Locke’s fee was one dollar which included two sessions daily; everybody paid the same, whether millionaire or pauper. Those who were unable to pay were treated free. His one dollar per visit treatments included advice on taking exercise, wearing properly fitted shoes with orthotic supports, and prescriptions for associated ailments, such as hypothyroidism.
Around 1925 interest in his foot treatment grew rapidly with patients from all over North America, and some from Europe. By 1932 Dr Locke was giving over 2000 treatments daily. During the Depression years this enormous influx brought significant prosperity to the region. Large numbers of his patients claimed to be cured or relieved by this method and his reputation spread throughout North America and overseas.
In 1940 the top selling brand of health-footwear was ‘Lockewedge’, designed & approved by Dr. M.W. Locke as he felt ill-fitting shoes contributed to foot pains. This orthopedic shoe was made by The Perth Shoe Company in Canada.
Films of him working show that the manipulative procedure was rapid, lasting between 5 -7 seconds. Sometimes he would also manipulate the hands. On and on he would go, round and round in his swivel chair from foot to foot and hand to hand, having a break every few hours for a rest (or drink).
Dr Locke died February 6, 1942 from pneumonia. His brother-in law J. Alex Mc Gruer, a Chiropractor, carried on the practice, but it did not work out and it came to an end. The magic of Dr Locke was gone. Dr. Locke himself was largely forgotten, although he is remembered by some in the medical community as a pioneer in the field of reflexology.
Images
Less detail

Dr. M. W. Locke Williamsburg, Ont. [photograph postcard]

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact2522
Dates
1920
1940
circa 1920-1940
Collection
Dr. Michael A. Chiong Patent Medicine Collection
Category
Archival Items
Classification
Archival, Images
Treatment, General
Accession Number
996001485
Description
Cardboard postcard, unused; glossy picture of Dr. M.W. Locke; smiling, dressed in a suit with a wide diagonally-striped tie, with the outside of a house as a backdrop (barely seen); back: room for correspondence and address; picture on front is a little grainy and blurry; message on picture is hand…
  2 images  
Accession Number
996001485
Collection
Dr. Michael A. Chiong Patent Medicine Collection
Category
Archival Items
Classification
Archival, Images
Treatment, General
MeSH Heading
Physicians -- portraits
Rehabilitation
Description
Cardboard postcard, unused; glossy picture of Dr. M.W. Locke; smiling, dressed in a suit with a wide diagonally-striped tie, with the outside of a house as a backdrop (barely seen); back: room for correspondence and address; picture on front is a little grainy and blurry; message on picture is handwritten.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Purchased by Dr. M. Chiong for his patent medicine collection, before July 15, 1995.
Site Made (Country)
Belgium
Dates
1920
1940
circa 1920-1940
Material
paper: black; white
Inscriptions
Front: "Dr. M. W. LOCKE WILLIAMSBURG // COPYRIGHT RESVD. ONT."; back: "Post Card // PRINTED IN BELGIUM // CORRESPONDENCE ADDRESS"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 2005
2005-5-6
Binder A
Dimension Notes
Length: 14.0 cm. x Width: 8.8 cm.
Condition Remarks
Front: some indentation lines all over photograph; two marks at the top, one right, one left, and other white lines near the bottom -- may be part of the photograph; back very minimal sun / age discolouration
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Book
Other
Reference Comments
Jonathan Walford's Blog; "Doctor M.W. Locke and the Williamsburg Scene" by J. Smyth Carter, 1933; "The Canadian Magazine", Feb. 1933: "Dr. Locke - Patients Sing Praises - Medical Interests Scoff"
Research Facts
Dr. Mahlon W. Locke (1880-1942) born in, Dixon's Corners Ontario. Started high school at 12; great grandfather was John McIntosh, discoverer of the McIntosh Red Apple tree. In 1901 he enrolled at Queens College of Medicine, graduating in 1905. In 1907 he decided to undertake postgraduate training in Scotland, spending time at both the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh and the Faculty of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow. Opened his medical practice in Williamsburg June 1, 1908; married Miss Blanche McGruer and had 4 children.
On his return to Williamsburg, he treated the village blacksmith who was crippled with arthritis and was almost unable to work. After many sessions of Dr Locke’s foot manipulations, he regained much of his mobility and was able to return to his work. This seems to be the first recorded treatment and the one which would set the scene for Locke’s future reputation.
Interested in arthritis, which he believed was caused principally by fallen arches caused arthritis and other ills; he put the arches back in place by manual manipulation of their feet, relieving pressure on the posterior tibial nerve. Dr Locke’s fee was one dollar which included two sessions daily; everybody paid the same, whether millionaire or pauper. Those who were unable to pay were treated free. His one dollar per visit treatments included advice on taking exercise, wearing properly fitted shoes with orthotic supports, and prescriptions for associated ailments, such as hypothyroidism.
Around 1925 interest in his foot treatment grew rapidly with patients from all over North America, and some from Europe. By 1932 Dr Locke was giving over 2000 treatments daily. During the Depression years this enormous influx brought significant prosperity to the region. Large numbers of his patients claimed to be cured or relieved by this method and his reputation spread throughout North America and overseas.
In 1940 the top selling brand of health-footwear was ‘Lockewedge’, designed & approved by Dr. M.W. Locke as he felt ill-fitting shoes contributed to foot pains. This orthopedic shoe was made by The Perth Shoe Company in Canada.
Films of him working show that the manipulative procedure was rapid, lasting between 5 -7 seconds. Sometimes he would also manipulate the hands. On and on he would go, round and round in his swivel chair from foot to foot and hand to hand, having a break every few hours for a rest (or drink).
Dr Locke died February 6, 1942 from pneumonia. His brother-in law J. Alex Mc Gruer, a Chiropractor, carried on the practice, but it did not work out and it came to an end. The magic of Dr Locke was gone. Dr. Locke himself was largely forgotten, although he is remembered by some in the medical community as a pioneer in the field of reflexology.
Images
Less detail

A portrait study of Dr. M. W. Locke Williamsburg, Ont. [photograph postcard]

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact2523
Dates
1920
1940
circa 1920-1940
Collection
Dr. Michael A. Chiong Patent Medicine Collection
Category
Archival Items
Classification
Archival, Images
Treatment, General
Accession Number
996001486
Description
Cardboard postcard, unused; glossy portrait study of Dr. M. W. Locke; front: a posed Dr. Locke seated and half-turned, wearing a dark suit and vest in a room, presumably his house or office; picture is a little spotted, but otherwise very clear; message on picture handwritten.
  2 images  
Accession Number
996001486
Collection
Dr. Michael A. Chiong Patent Medicine Collection
Category
Archival Items
Classification
Archival, Images
Treatment, General
MeSH Heading
Physicians -- portraits
Rehabilitation
Description
Cardboard postcard, unused; glossy portrait study of Dr. M. W. Locke; front: a posed Dr. Locke seated and half-turned, wearing a dark suit and vest in a room, presumably his house or office; picture is a little spotted, but otherwise very clear; message on picture handwritten.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Purchased by Dr. M. Chiong for his patent medicine collection, before July 15, 1995.
Site Made (Country)
Belgium
Dates
1920
1940
circa 1920-1940
Material
paper: black; white
Inscriptions
Front: "A PORTRAIT STUDY OF - // Dr. M.W. LOCKE WILLIAMSBURG ONT. // COPYRIGHTS RESERVED"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 2005
2005-5-6
Binder A
Dimension Notes
Length: 14.0 cm. x Width: 8.8 cm.
Condition Remarks
Right top corner paper slightly peeled away; indentation marks and others where it appears some of the topmost layer has "eroded"; edges and corners are a little beaten and soft, and some dark spots are very visible in the top half of the picture; back: sun / age discoloured, but mainly around the bottom edge
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Book
Other
Reference Comments
Jonathan Walford's Blog; "Doctor M.W. Locke and the Williamsburg Scene" by J. Smyth Carter, 1933; "The Canadian Magazine", Feb. 1933: "Dr. Locke - Patients Sing Praises - Medical Interests Scoff"
Research Facts
Dr. Mahlon W. Locke (1880-1942) born in, Dixon's Corners Ontario. Started high school at 12; great grandfather was John McIntosh, discoverer of the McIntosh Red Apple tree. In 1901 he enrolled at Queens College of Medicine, graduating in 1905. In 1907 he decided to undertake postgraduate training in Scotland, spending time at both the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh and the Faculty of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow. Opened his medical practice in Williamsburg June 1, 1908; married Miss Blanche McGruer and had 4 children.
On his return to Williamsburg, he treated the village blacksmith who was crippled with arthritis and was almost unable to work. After many sessions of Dr Locke’s foot manipulations, he regained much of his mobility and was able to return to his work. This seems to be the first recorded treatment and the one which would set the scene for Locke’s future reputation.
Interested in arthritis, which he believed was caused principally by fallen arches caused arthritis and other ills; he put the arches back in place by manual manipulation of their feet, relieving pressure on the posterior tibial nerve. Dr Locke’s fee was one dollar which included two sessions daily; everybody paid the same, whether millionaire or pauper. Those who were unable to pay were treated free. His one dollar per visit treatments included advice on taking exercise, wearing properly fitted shoes with orthotic supports, and prescriptions for associated ailments, such as hypothyroidism.
Around 1925 interest in his foot treatment grew rapidly with patients from all over North America, and some from Europe. By 1932 Dr Locke was giving over 2000 treatments daily. During the Depression years this enormous influx brought significant prosperity to the region. Large numbers of his patients claimed to be cured or relieved by this method and his reputation spread throughout North America and overseas.
In 1940 the top selling brand of health-footwear was ‘Lockewedge’, designed & approved by Dr. M.W. Locke as he felt ill-fitting shoes contributed to foot pains. This orthopedic shoe was made by The Perth Shoe Company in Canada.
Films of him working show that the manipulative procedure was rapid, lasting between 5 -7 seconds. Sometimes he would also manipulate the hands. On and on he would go, round and round in his swivel chair from foot to foot and hand to hand, having a break every few hours for a rest (or drink).
Dr Locke died February 6, 1942 from pneumonia. His brother-in law J. Alex Mc Gruer, a Chiropractor, carried on the practice, but it did not work out and it came to an end. The magic of Dr Locke was gone. Dr. Locke himself was largely forgotten, although he is remembered by some in the medical community as a pioneer in the field of reflexology.
Images
Less detail

Dr. Locke treating patients Williamsburg, Ont. [photograph postcard]

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact2524
Dates
1920
1940
circa 1920-1940
Collection
Dr. Michael A. Chiong Patent Medicine Collection
Category
Archival Items
Classification
Archival, Images
Treatment, General
Accession Number
996001487
Description
Cardboard postcard, unused; glossy picture of Dr. M. W. Locke treating a patient with many others waiting in the background; old black & white photograph (looks brown & white); "treatment" is taking place outdoors; message in picture is handwritten.
  2 images  
Accession Number
996001487
Collection
Dr. Michael A. Chiong Patent Medicine Collection
Category
Archival Items
Classification
Archival, Images
Treatment, General
MeSH Heading
Physicians -- portraits
Rehabilitation
Description
Cardboard postcard, unused; glossy picture of Dr. M. W. Locke treating a patient with many others waiting in the background; old black & white photograph (looks brown & white); "treatment" is taking place outdoors; message in picture is handwritten.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Purchased by Dr. M. Chiong for his patent medicine collection, before July 15, 1995.
Site Made (Country)
Canada
Dates
1920
1940
circa 1920-1940
Material
paper: brown; white
Inscriptions
Front: "Dr. LOCKE TREATING PATIENTS // # WILLIAMSBURG ONT. #"; back: "POST CARD // MADE IN CANADA // CORRESPONDENCE ADDRESS // PLACE // STAMP // HERE"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 2005
2005-5-6
Binder A
Dimension Notes
Length: 13.9 cm. x Width: 8.9 cm.
Condition Remarks
Photograph is old, but otherwise in excellent condition with only one indented line near his shoulder; at the very bottom, in the white "frame" is a small pinprick; back is very clean with a minimum of discolouration around the edges
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Book
Other
Research Facts
Dr. Mahlon W. Locke (1880-1942) born in, Dixon's Corners Ontario. Started high school at 12; great grandfather was John McIntosh, discoverer of the McIntosh Red Apple tree. In 1901 he enrolled at Queens College of Medicine, graduating in 1905. In 1907 he decided to undertake postgraduate training in Scotland, spending time at both the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh and the Faculty of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow. Opened his medical practice in Williamsburg June 1, 1908; married Miss Blanche McGruer and had 4 children.
On his return to Williamsburg, he treated the village blacksmith who was crippled with arthritis and was almost unable to work. After many sessions of Dr Locke’s foot manipulations, he regained much of his mobility and was able to return to his work. This seems to be the first recorded treatment and the one which would set the scene for Locke’s future reputation.
Interested in arthritis, which he believed was caused principally by fallen arches caused arthritis and other ills; he put the arches back in place by manual manipulation of their feet, relieving pressure on the posterior tibial nerve. Dr Locke’s fee was one dollar which included two sessions daily; everybody paid the same, whether millionaire or pauper. Those who were unable to pay were treated free. His one dollar per visit treatments included advice on taking exercise, wearing properly fitted shoes with orthotic supports, and prescriptions for associated ailments, such as hypothyroidism.
Around 1925 interest in his foot treatment grew rapidly with patients from all over North America, and some from Europe. By 1932 Dr Locke was giving over 2000 treatments daily. During the Depression years this enormous influx brought significant prosperity to the region. Large numbers of his patients claimed to be cured or relieved by this method and his reputation spread throughout North America and overseas.
In 1940 the top selling brand of health-footwear was ‘Lockewedge’, designed & approved by Dr. M.W. Locke as he felt ill-fitting shoes contributed to foot pains. This orthopedic shoe was made by The Perth Shoe Company in Canada.
Films of him working show that the manipulative procedure was rapid, lasting between 5 -7 seconds. Sometimes he would also manipulate the hands. On and on he would go, round and round in his swivel chair from foot to foot and hand to hand, having a break every few hours for a rest (or drink).
Dr Locke died February 6, 1942 from pneumonia. His brother-in law J. Alex Mc Gruer, a Chiropractor, carried on the practice, but it did not work out and it came to an end. The magic of Dr Locke was gone. Dr. Locke himself was largely forgotten, although he is remembered by some in the medical community as a pioneer in the field of reflexology.
Images
Less detail

Dr. Locke surrounded by patients [photograph postcard]

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact2525
Dates
1940
circa 1920-1940
Collection
Dr. Michael A. Chiong Patent Medicine Collection
Category
Archival Items
Classification
Archival, Images
Treatment, General
Accession Number
996001488
Description
Cardboard postcard, unused; glossy picture of Dr. M.W. Locke listening to a patient, of the many surrounding him, outdoors; black and white photograph with a much more defined black and a clear picture, although still has the white dots and lines found in older photographs; message on picture is ha…
  2 images  
Accession Number
996001488
Collection
Dr. Michael A. Chiong Patent Medicine Collection
Category
Archival Items
Classification
Archival, Images
Treatment, General
MeSH Heading
Physicians -- portraits
Rehabilitation
Description
Cardboard postcard, unused; glossy picture of Dr. M.W. Locke listening to a patient, of the many surrounding him, outdoors; black and white photograph with a much more defined black and a clear picture, although still has the white dots and lines found in older photographs; message on picture is handwritten.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Purchased by Dr. M. Chiong for his patent medicine collection, before July 15, 1995.
Site Made (Country)
Canada
Dates
1940
circa 1920-1940
Material
paper: black; white
Inscriptions
Front: "Dr. LOCKE SURROUNDED // BY PATIENTS"; back: "POST CARD // MADE IN CANADA // CORRESPONDENCE ADDRESS // PLACE // STAMP // HERE"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 2005
2005-5-6
Binder A
Dimension Notes
Length: 13.9 cm. x Width: 8.9 cm.
Condition Remarks
Corners slightly soft and bent; photograph has white "dotting" throughout; back is very clean, slight discolouration near the top left (in the word "POST")
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Book
Other
Reference Comments
Jonathan Walford's Blog; "Doctor M.W. Locke and the Williamsburg Scene" by J. Smyth Carter, 1933; "The Canadian Magazine", Feb. 1933: "Dr. Locke - Patients Sing Praises - Medical Interests Scoff"
Research Facts
Dr. Mahlon W. Locke (1880-1942) born in, Dixon's Corners Ontario. Started high school at 12; great grandfather was John McIntosh, discoverer of the McIntosh Red Apple tree. In 1901 he enrolled at Queens College of Medicine, graduating in 1905. In 1907 he decided to undertake postgraduate training in Scotland, spending time at both the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh and the Faculty of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow. Opened his medical practice in Williamsburg June 1, 1908; married Miss Blanche McGruer and had 4 children.
On his return to Williamsburg, he treated the village blacksmith who was crippled with arthritis and was almost unable to work. After many sessions of Dr Locke’s foot manipulations, he regained much of his mobility and was able to return to his work. This seems to be the first recorded treatment and the one which would set the scene for Locke’s future reputation.
Interested in arthritis, which he believed was caused principally by fallen arches caused arthritis and other ills; he put the arches back in place by manual manipulation of their feet, relieving pressure on the posterior tibial nerve. Dr Locke’s fee was one dollar which included two sessions daily; everybody paid the same, whether millionaire or pauper. Those who were unable to pay were treated free. His one dollar per visit treatments included advice on taking exercise, wearing properly fitted shoes with orthotic supports, and prescriptions for associated ailments, such as hypothyroidism.
Around 1925 interest in his foot treatment grew rapidly with patients from all over North America, and some from Europe. By 1932 Dr Locke was giving over 2000 treatments daily. During the Depression years this enormous influx brought significant prosperity to the region. Large numbers of his patients claimed to be cured or relieved by this method and his reputation spread throughout North America and overseas.
In 1940 the top selling brand of health-footwear was ‘Lockewedge’, designed & approved by Dr. M.W. Locke as he felt ill-fitting shoes contributed to foot pains. This orthopedic shoe was made by The Perth Shoe Company in Canada.
Films of him working show that the manipulative procedure was rapid, lasting between 5 -7 seconds. Sometimes he would also manipulate the hands. On and on he would go, round and round in his swivel chair from foot to foot and hand to hand, having a break every few hours for a rest (or drink).
Dr Locke died February 6, 1942 from pneumonia. His brother-in law J. Alex Mc Gruer, a Chiropractor, carried on the practice, but it did not work out and it came to an end. The magic of Dr Locke was gone. Dr. Locke himself was largely forgotten, although he is remembered by some in the medical community as a pioneer in the field of reflexology.
Images
Less detail

Dr. Locke Treating a Stretcher Patient, Williamsburg, Ontario [photograph postcard]

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact2526
Dates
0
1940
circa 1920-1940
Collection
Dr. Michael A. Chiong Patent Medicine Collection
Category
Archival Items
Classification
Archival, Images
Treatment, General
Accession Number
996001489
Description
Cardboard postcard, unused, of Dr. Locke treating a patient; black & white photograph copy (not glossy); message printed; shot out of doors.
  2 images  
Accession Number
996001489
Collection
Dr. Michael A. Chiong Patent Medicine Collection
Category
Archival Items
Classification
Archival, Images
Treatment, General
MeSH Heading
Physicians -- portraits
Rehabilitation
Description
Cardboard postcard, unused, of Dr. Locke treating a patient; black & white photograph copy (not glossy); message printed; shot out of doors.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Purchased by Dr. M. Chiong for his patent medicine collection, before July 15, 1995.
Maker
PhotoGelatine Engraving Co. Ltd.
Site Made (City)
Ottawa
Site Made (State)
Ontario
Site Made (Country)
Canada
Dates
0
1940
circa 1920-1940
Material
paper: black; white
Inscriptions
Front: "Dr. Locke Treating a Stretcher Patient, Williamsburg, Ontario"; back: "POST CARD // Carte Postale // Photogelatine Engraving Co. Limited, Ottawa. // MADE IN CANADA"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 2005
2005-5-6
Binder A
Dimension Notes
Length: 13.7 cm. x Width: 8.9 cm.
Condition Remarks
Front is a little scratched up; top left has a small brown dot stain, and bottom left has some ink smudge; back has some ink stained through, but the discolouration is light and consistent; corners a little soft
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Book
Other
Reference Comments
Jonathan Walford's Blog; "Doctor M.W. Locke and the Williamsburg Scene" by J. Smyth Carter, 1933; "The Canadian Magazine", Feb. 1933: "Dr. Locke - Patients Sing Praises - Medical Interests Scoff"
Research Facts
Dr. Mahlon W. Locke (1880-1942) born in, Dixon's Corners Ontario. Started high school at 12; great grandfather was John McIntosh, discoverer of the McIntosh Red Apple tree. In 1901 he enrolled at Queens College of Medicine, graduating in 1905. In 1907 he decided to undertake postgraduate training in Scotland, spending time at both the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh and the Faculty of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow. Opened his medical practice in Williamsburg June 1, 1908; married Miss Blanche McGruer and had 4 children.
On his return to Williamsburg, he treated the village blacksmith who was crippled with arthritis and was almost unable to work. After many sessions of Dr Locke’s foot manipulations, he regained much of his mobility and was able to return to his work. This seems to be the first recorded treatment and the one which would set the scene for Locke’s future reputation.
Interested in arthritis, which he believed was caused principally by fallen arches caused arthritis and other ills; he put the arches back in place by manual manipulation of their feet, relieving pressure on the posterior tibial nerve. Dr Locke’s fee was one dollar which included two sessions daily; everybody paid the same, whether millionaire or pauper. Those who were unable to pay were treated free. His one dollar per visit treatments included advice on taking exercise, wearing properly fitted shoes with orthotic supports, and prescriptions for associated ailments, such as hypothyroidism.
Around 1925 interest in his foot treatment grew rapidly with patients from all over North America, and some from Europe. By 1932 Dr Locke was giving over 2000 treatments daily. During the Depression years this enormous influx brought significant prosperity to the region. Large numbers of his patients claimed to be cured or relieved by this method and his reputation spread throughout North America and overseas.
In 1940 the top selling brand of health-footwear was ‘Lockewedge’, designed & approved by Dr. M.W. Locke as he felt ill-fitting shoes contributed to foot pains. This orthopedic shoe was made by The Perth Shoe Company in Canada.
Films of him working show that the manipulative procedure was rapid, lasting between 5 -7 seconds. Sometimes he would also manipulate the hands. On and on he would go, round and round in his swivel chair from foot to foot and hand to hand, having a break every few hours for a rest (or drink).
Dr Locke died February 6, 1942 from pneumonia. His brother-in law J. Alex Mc Gruer, a Chiropractor, carried on the practice, but it did not work out and it came to an end. The magic of Dr Locke was gone. Dr. Locke himself was largely forgotten, although he is remembered by some in the medical community as a pioneer in the field of reflexology.
Images
Less detail

At Dr. Locke's Clinic [photograph postcard]

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact2527
Dates
1920
1940
circa 1920-1940
Collection
Dr. Michael A. Chiong Patent Medicine Collection
Category
Archival Items
Classification
Archival, Images
Treatment, General
Accession Number
996001490
Description
Cardboard glossy picture postcard, black-and-white, unused, of Dr. Locke's Clinic; a small circular open space is where Dr. Locke, with his wheeled chair, goes from one patient to the next, they divided so they radiate outward from the centre, divided by metal pipe railings; message handwritten.
  2 images  
Accession Number
996001490
Collection
Dr. Michael A. Chiong Patent Medicine Collection
Category
Archival Items
Classification
Archival, Images
Treatment, General
MeSH Heading
Physicians -- portraits
Rehabilitation
Description
Cardboard glossy picture postcard, black-and-white, unused, of Dr. Locke's Clinic; a small circular open space is where Dr. Locke, with his wheeled chair, goes from one patient to the next, they divided so they radiate outward from the centre, divided by metal pipe railings; message handwritten.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Purchased by Dr. M. Chiong for his patent medicine collection, before July 15, 1995.
Site Made (Country)
Canada
Dates
1920
1940
circa 1920-1940
Material
paper: black; white
Inscriptions
Front: "AT Dr. LOCKE'S CLINIC."; back: "POST CARD // MADE IN CANADA // CORRESPONDENCE ADDRESS // PLACE // STAMP // HERE"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 2005
2005-5-6
Binder A
Dimension Notes
Length: 13.8 cm. x Width: 8.9 cm.
Condition Remarks
Lines and indented scratches all across picture; right top corner slightly bent, as are the bottom left and right; glossy finish has deteriorated around the edges and top right corner; back has minor discolouration around the edges
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Book
Other
Research Facts
Jonathan Walford's Blog; "Doctor M.W. Locke and the Williamsburg Scene" by J. Smyth Carter, 1933; "The Canadian Magazine", Feb. 1933: "Dr. Locke - Patients Sing Praises - Medical Interests Scoff"
Publications
Dr. Mahlon W. Locke (1880-1942) born in, Dixon's Corners Ontario. Started high school at 12; great grandfather was John McIntosh, discoverer of the McIntosh Red Apple tree. In 1901 he enrolled at Queens College of Medicine, graduating in 1905. In 1907 he decided to undertake postgraduate training in Scotland, spending time at both the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh and the Faculty of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow. Opened his medical practice in Williamsburg June 1, 1908; married Miss Blanche McGruer and had 4 children.
On his return to Williamsburg, he treated the village blacksmith who was crippled with arthritis and was almost unable to work. After many sessions of Dr Locke’s foot manipulations, he regained much of his mobility and was able to return to his work. This seems to be the first recorded treatment and the one which would set the scene for Locke’s future reputation.
Interested in arthritis, which he believed was caused principally by fallen arches caused arthritis and other ills; he put the arches back in place by manual manipulation of their feet, relieving pressure on the posterior tibial nerve. Dr Locke’s fee was one dollar which included two sessions daily; everybody paid the same, whether millionaire or pauper. Those who were unable to pay were treated free. His one dollar per visit treatments included advice on taking exercise, wearing properly fitted shoes with orthotic supports, and prescriptions for associated ailments, such as hypothyroidism.
Around 1925 interest in his foot treatment grew rapidly with patients from all over North America, and some from Europe. By 1932 Dr Locke was giving over 2000 treatments daily. During the Depression years this enormous influx brought significant prosperity to the region. Large numbers of his patients claimed to be cured or relieved by this method and his reputation spread throughout North America and overseas.
In 1940 the top selling brand of health-footwear was ‘Lockewedge’, designed & approved by Dr. M.W. Locke as he felt ill-fitting shoes contributed to foot pains. This orthopedic shoe was made by The Perth Shoe Company in Canada.
Films of him working show that the manipulative procedure was rapid, lasting between 5 -7 seconds. Sometimes he would also manipulate the hands. On and on he would go, round and round in his swivel chair from foot to foot and hand to hand, having a break every few hours for a rest (or drink).
Dr Locke died February 6, 1942 from pneumonia. His brother-in law J. Alex Mc Gruer, a Chiropractor, carried on the practice, but it did not work out and it came to an end. The magic of Dr Locke was gone. Dr. Locke himself was largely forgotten, although he is remembered by some in the medical community as a pioneer in the field of reflexology.
Images
Less detail

22 records – page 1 of 3.