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Dates
1830
1900
circa 1830-1900
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Pediatrics
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Treatment, General
Nursing
Patient Care
Accession Number
1955.5.4
Description
Ceramic open vessel style pap boat with a pouring lip and raised back of body; white glaze with light blue floral transfer-print decoration on exterior and interior perimenter of opening; pattern depicting an English landscape scene with a masted ship, trees; partially glazed bottom; stamped in bas…
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Accession Number
1955.5.4
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Pediatrics
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Treatment, General
Nursing
Patient Care
MeSH Heading
Feeding Methods
Home Health Nursing
MM= Feeding Dish
Nursing Care -- instrumentation
Description
Ceramic open vessel style pap boat with a pouring lip and raised back of body; white glaze with light blue floral transfer-print decoration on exterior and interior perimenter of opening; pattern depicting an English landscape scene with a masted ship, trees; partially glazed bottom; stamped in base "Wedgewood England"
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Acquired from the Academy of Medicine; donated by Dr. T. G. H. Drake, through the University of Toronto Department of Pediatrics.
Maker
Wedgwood
Site Made (Country)
England
Dates
1830
1900
circa 1830-1900
Material
ceramic: white
ink: blue
Inscriptions
"WEDGWOOD M // INP"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1-
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Dimension Notes
Length 10.3 cm x Width 5.5 cm x Height 4.8 cm
Condition Remarks
Some cracks in glaze
Copy Type
Original
Research Facts
Pap boat is a small receptacle for feeding pap to infants and invalids. The typical form is boat-shaped, having the feeding end shaped as a short lip or an extended tapering lip to be placed on the mouth of the person being fed, and the holding end somewhat incurved and usually without a handle.
The term 'pap', allegedly derived from the Scandinavian for the sound made when a baby opens his mouth for nourishment, was probably introduced before its first recordings in literature in the mid-18th century. Recipes for pap usually called for bread, flour and water. A more nourishing mixture, 'panada', was a pap base with added butter and milk, or cooked in broth as a milk substitute.
Previous inventory #AM28
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