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Gin Pills for the Kidneys

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact2176
Dates
1920
1940
circa 1920-1940
Collection
Dr. Michael A. Chiong Patent Medicine Collection
Category
Diagnostic & Treatment Artifacts
Pharmacy and Drug Artifacts
Home Health Care
Classification
Pharmacy, General
Treatment
Treatment, General
Home Health
Accession Number
996001097
Description
Circular yellow metal tin with decorative design on top with black text; not openeable, stuck together; direction on bottom and sides.
  3 images  
Accession Number
996001097
Collection
Dr. Michael A. Chiong Patent Medicine Collection
Category
Diagnostic & Treatment Artifacts
Pharmacy and Drug Artifacts
Home Health Care
Classification
Pharmacy, General
Treatment
Treatment, General
Home Health
MeSH Heading
Kidney Diseases -- drug therapy -- advertisements
Backache -- drug therapy -- advertisements
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Pharmaceuticals
Pharmacy
Pharmacy -- pamphlet
Drug Packaging -- container -- box and packet
Drug Packaging -- container -- bottle
Drugs
Drugs -- Non-Prescription
Drugs -- pamphlet
Drugs -- patent, proprietary, over-the-counter multi-purpose cures – container
Description
Circular yellow metal tin with decorative design on top with black text; not openeable, stuck together; direction on bottom and sides.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Acquired by Dr. M. Chiong for his patent medicine collection; purchased in Kingston in Feb.1994.
Maker
National Drug and Chemical Co. of Canada Ltd.
Site Made (City)
Montreal
Site Made (State)
Quebec
Site Made (Country)
Canada
Dates
1920
1940
circa 1920-1940
Material
metal: yellow
ink: black
Inscriptions
On top: "B C D // GIN // PILLS // FOR THE // KIDNEYS // TRADE MARK REGISTERED"; on bottom: "Gin // Pills // for the // Kidneys // No. 5611 The Proporietary or Patent // Medicine Act. // Take one or two pills four times a day, // before or after meals, and at bed-time. // French version // GIN PILLS CONTAIN THREE-EIGHTS (3/8) OF A GRAIN // OF METHYLENE BLUE PER MAXIMUM ADULT 1 DOSE // PROPRIETARY ARTICLES DEPT. // National Drug and Chemical // Company of Canada Limited // MONTREAL // CANADA"; on sides: "THESE PILLS ARE RECOMMENDED FOR LAME BACK, IRRITATION OF THE KIDNEYS OR BLADDER, BED WETTING, MUCOUS DEPOSITS IN THE URINE 40 PILLS"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-A2-5 Row E
Temporary Location
On exhibit “Quack: The Exhibit that cures all” at Museum of Health Care, 29 June 2017.
Height
3.1
Diameter
5.2
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Shows minor wear on bottom; closure stuck together
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Internet
Reference Comments
http://necrophiliac-joe.blogspot.com/2012/02/bdc-gin-pills-for-kidneys.html
Research Facts
Have been said to turn the urine green, most likely because they contain methylene blue.
Exhibit History
To display in Museum: Potions, Pills and Prescriptions; May 1, 2000 - 28 Jan 2017
Images
Less detail

Dr. A. W. Chase's Kidney-Liver Pills

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact13510
Dates
1900
1920
circa 1900-1920
Collection
Dr. Ralph and Mrs. Olga Crawford Canadian Dental Collection
Category
Diagnostic & Treatment Artifacts
Pharmacy and Drug Artifacts
Home Health Care
Classification
Pharmacy, General
Pharmacy, Gastrointestinal
Treatment
Treatment, General
Home Health
Accession Number
010020389 a-b
Description
Box of kidney-liver pills; brown wooden cylindrical box (a) and lid (b); yellow paper label around box; directions and manufacturing information printed with black ink in English and French; box contains white cotton and brown pills.
  3 images  
Accession Number
010020389 a-b
Collection
Dr. Ralph and Mrs. Olga Crawford Canadian Dental Collection
Category
Diagnostic & Treatment Artifacts
Pharmacy and Drug Artifacts
Home Health Care
Classification
Pharmacy, General
Pharmacy, Gastrointestinal
Treatment
Treatment, General
Home Health
MeSH Heading
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Pharmaceuticals
Pharmacy
Drug Packaging -- container -- bottle
Drugs
Cathartics
Constipation -- drug therapy
Drugs, Non-Prescription
MM= Drugs -- patent, proprietary, over-the-counter -- container
MM= Drug Packaging -- container -- vial
Description
Box of kidney-liver pills; brown wooden cylindrical box (a) and lid (b); yellow paper label around box; directions and manufacturing information printed with black ink in English and French; box contains white cotton and brown pills.
Number Of Parts
2
Part Names
a - box
b - cap
Provenance
Transfer from the Dental Canada Fund; previously housed in the Dentistry Canada Museum (Ottawa).
Maker
Dr. A. W. Chase Medecine Co.
Site Made (City)
Toronto
Site Made (State)
Ontario
Site Made (Country)
Canada
Dates
1900
1920
circa 1900-1920
Date Remarks
Based on design
Material
wood: brown
paper: yellow
ink: black
fabric: white
Inscriptions
(a) Printed on label: "DR. A. W. CHASE'S // KIDNEY - // LIVER PILLS // DIRECTIONS:" in English and French; "No. 39 Proprietary or Patent // Medicine Act. // MANUFACTURED BY // THE DR. A. W. CHASE MEDICINE CO. // TORONTO, ONT., // BUFFALO, N. Y., LONDON, ENG. // Edmanson, Bates & Co., Props."
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-A2-5 Row E
Length
a - 4.8
b - 1.3
Diameter
a - 2.5
b - 2.5
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Pills inside box are deteriorating; label on box is stained, ripped
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Person
Internet
Reference Comments
Donor
Why the appeal? A study of almanacs advertising Dr. Chase's patent medicines, 1904–1959. Denise Maines.
Research Facts
Dr Ralph and Mrs Olga Crawford donated their extensive Canadian dental collection to the DCF to create the museum in 1997; further donations were received while Dr Crawford was Curator Emeritus at the Dental Canada Museum until its closure in 2008; the label claims the product works as a kidney regulator, neutralizing kidney acid, stopping Bright's disease, and as a strong purgative.
Patent medicines were advertised, and presumably consumed, with much vigour in the late-19th and early-20th centuries.
In 1904, the original product line included Dr. Chase's Nerve Food, Liver Cure, Backache Plasters, Ointment, Catarrh Cure, Syrup of Linseed and Turpentine and Kidney-Liver Pills. Somewhere between 1924 and 1927, Dr. Chase's Liniment was added to this list, and Mouthwash was sold between 1927 and 1938. Paradol, a painkiller, was introduced in the 1950s and D.M.H Cough Syrups, Cold Tablets and Enerjets emerged in 1959. Though Backache Plasters were not advertised in the 1930s, they were included in the 1950s, so that the list of medicines sold by Dr. Chase's Medicine Company in 1959 contains all of the original product line with only minor modifications to a few of these products, as well as the new arrivals.
Images
Less detail
Dates
1910
1920
circa 1910 - 1920
Category
Home Health Care
Classification
Treatment, General
Accession Number
013025001
Description
Long cylindrical silver metal tube with manufacturing information engraved on the body of the device; metal knobs protrude from both ends and have long fabric strings connected to them; these strings end with two metal ankle attachments with elastic fabric to hold them in place.
  2 images  
Accession Number
013025001
Category
Home Health Care
Classification
Treatment, General
MeSH Heading
MM= patent, proprietary, over-the-counter all-purpose cures
Description
Long cylindrical silver metal tube with manufacturing information engraved on the body of the device; metal knobs protrude from both ends and have long fabric strings connected to them; these strings end with two metal ankle attachments with elastic fabric to hold them in place.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Found when donor purchased a house and its contents on Thomas Street that had been boarded up for circa 50 years.
Maker
The Oxygenor Company
Site Made (City)
Chatham
Site Made (State)
Ontario
Site Made (Country)
Canada
Dates
1910
1920
circa 1910 - 1920
Date Remarks
Online research
Material
metal: silver
fabric: red, green, black
Inscriptions
Engraved on the Oxygenor: "S W // TRADE // OXYGENOPATHY // MARK // CURES DISEASES BY OXYGEN // STRONGEST OXYGENOR MADE // PRICE $35.00 // PATENTED IN CANADA 1912 // PATENTS APPLIED FOR IN ALL FOREIGN COUNTRIES // THE OXYGENOR CO. // CHATHAM ONT. CAN. // M"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-F5-3
Length
17.5
Diameter
3.8
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Minor damage to nickel plating on body; minor loss of fabric covering metal strands
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Internet
Reference Comments
Mechanical Fakes. The Health Bulletin
Electropoise. Wikipedia
1900 Quack Medical Device, Oxygenor-King. Worth Point
Research Facts
The Oxygenor Company created products that rivaled Hercules H. Sanches' own Oxydonor. Both products looked similar and stated to "cure all diseases." Sanches went to court for the violation of his patent but the court claimed that there was not enough evidence for the value of his invention and therefore that it could not be protected. Justice Shiras and the other judges declared that his theory of "diaduction" (a term he coined) was a mere pretence to allow him to obtain a patent.
The Oxygenor when exposed to a temperature ranging from 25 to 66 degrees lower than that of the body, acting as one terminal, and the two treating plates attached to the body acting as the other terminal, the body completing the circuit between the treating plates, and the flexible conductor cords to the "generator," set up a gentle, imperceptible current of animal vitality, producing a combination of Thermo-Chemico currents of generative force, which are diffused through the entire body. At the same time the nascent allotropic oxygen evolved in the "generator" by this action is conveyed to the system, and by a process known as endosmotic action the oxygen of the atmosp is caused to be absorbed by the pores of the skin, the vitality of the body restored, impurities and impure gases thrown out, and the magnetic polarity of the atoms forming the body that may be out of the normal condition, restored.
The Oxygenor contained sulphur, sand, and charcoal; with sand and sulphur comprising 97% of the whole.
Images
Less detail
Dates
1890
1920
circa 1890-1920
Collection
Sills Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Nursing
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Nursing
Patient Care
Accession Number
015006001
Description
Cream coloured circular porcelain male bedpan with urinal funnel, with rolled rim; 27.5 cm diametercircular body; bulbous cylindrical neck.
  3 images  
Accession Number
015006001
Collection
Sills Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Nursing
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Nursing
Patient Care
MeSH Heading
Toilet Facilities
Nursing
MM= Home Nursing -- bedpan
Description
Cream coloured circular porcelain male bedpan with urinal funnel, with rolled rim; 27.5 cm diametercircular body; bulbous cylindrical neck.
Provenance
Donor's wife, June, used the bedpan as she travelled around to assist bedridden people in the community.
Dates
1890
1920
circa 1890-1920
Material
porcelain: cream
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0007
0007-N2-2
Length
37.0 cm
Width
26.7 cm
Height
13.5 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Bottom looks worn, few small scratches on body.
Copy Type
original
Research Facts
Similar to model 5957 pg. 1343 Down Bros. Ltd. Catalogue of Surgical Instruments & Appliances. 1906.
Images
Less detail
Dates
1910
1920
circa 1910-1920
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Treatment, General
Nursing
Accession Number
016001006
Description
White oval ceramic pap boat shaped invalid feeder with hand painted decorated of red cross near spout with gilt trim along opening, edge of handle and spout; open handle with two raised bumps on back with spout pointing straight ahead; without manufacturers marks; spout opening is part of body; par…
  1 image  
Accession Number
016001006
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Treatment, General
Nursing
MeSH Heading
Feeding Methods
Home Health Nursing
MM= Anesthesia, Inhalation -- accessories
MM= Feeding Dish
Nursing Care -- instrumentation
Description
White oval ceramic pap boat shaped invalid feeder with hand painted decorated of red cross near spout with gilt trim along opening, edge of handle and spout; open handle with two raised bumps on back with spout pointing straight ahead; without manufacturers marks; spout opening is part of body; partially glazed base.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and Alice Roeder.
Dates
1910
1920
circa 1910-1920
Date Remarks
Research
Material
ceramic: white
ink: red, gold
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1
Temporary Location
With MHC Education Program WWI: The Dirty Details of Disease Oct 2017, stored in Rm 2017.
Length
14.2 cm
Width
6.0 cm
Height
4.8 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Gilding partially worn, small minor crack on left side opening
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Documents
Book
eBook
Internet
Reference Comments
Allison, Eileen Michael. Ceramic Invalid Feeders, Pap Boats, and Baby Bottles of the 19th & Twentieth Century. Canada: E.M. Allison, 1997.
Campbell, Gordon. The Grove Encyclopedia of Decorative Arts. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2006. 2006. Accessed August 18, 2016. http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780195189483.001.0001/acref-9780195189483
Donor file
Research Facts
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and sister Alice Roeder, a retired nurse. The collection consists of various eras and types of invalid / infant feeders, infant milk bottles, medicine spoons, urinals and reference material.
The 1864 Geneva Convention marked the advent of the red cross as the symbol of impartial medical relief during wartimes and disasters. It was chosen as the Swiss flag in opposite colors to commemorate the Swiss advocate for the institution of this impartial aid and relief, Jean Henri Dunant. This popular symbol seems to have been superimposed on top of the glaze of many feeders after they were fired. One suggestion is that this meant that these were plain, utilitarian feeders were being repurposed for war times, or for hospitals in times of need. In addition, these could be home painted decorative additions to feeders that were meant to be donated as part of charity missions in the early 20th century.
Invalid feeders are designed to provide liquid or semi solid nourishment in time of illness or incapacity. There are many different shapes for invalid feeders. Some of the shapes are defined as infant or invalid feeders, however it seems that each manufacture used both terms interchangeably. The boat shaped, which looks very similar to a gravy boat, originally evolved from the pap boat shape. It has a straight spout, main opening in the top, and an open handle in the back. This is also known as an infant feeder prior to the development of baby milk bottles. Manufacturers would market this item as both invalid and infant feeders depending on the market they are targeting.
Images
Less detail
Dates
1890
1930
circa 1890-1930
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Treatment, General
Nursing
Accession Number
016001007
Description
White oval ceramic pap boat shaped invalid feeder hand painted floral design in pink band with brown and red over it on upper section with gilt trim along opening, edge of handle, base edge, under pink band and spout; open handle with two raised bumps on back with spout pointing straight ahead; wit…
  1 image  
Accession Number
016001007
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Treatment, General
Nursing
MeSH Heading
Feeding Methods
Home Health Nursing
MM= Anesthesia, Inhalation -- accessories
MM= Feeding Dish
Nursing Care -- instrumentation
Description
White oval ceramic pap boat shaped invalid feeder hand painted floral design in pink band with brown and red over it on upper section with gilt trim along opening, edge of handle, base edge, under pink band and spout; open handle with two raised bumps on back with spout pointing straight ahead; without manufacturers marks; spout opening is part of body; un glazed base.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and Alice Roeder.
Dates
1890
1930
circa 1890-1930
Date Remarks
Research
Material
ceramic: white
paint: pink, brown, blue, red
ink: gold
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1
Length
15.8 cm
Width
6.6 cm
Height
5.8 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Gilding worn in all areas; handle with repaired break on right side
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Documents
Book
eBook
Internet
Reference Comments
Allison, Eileen Michael. Ceramic Invalid Feeders, Pap Boats, and Baby Bottles of the 19th & Twentieth Century. Canada: E.M. Allison, 1997.
Campbell, Gordon. The Grove Encyclopedia of Decorative Arts. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2006. 2006. Accessed August 18, 2016. http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780195189483.001.0001/acref-9780195189483
Donor file
Research Facts
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and sister Alice Roeder, a retired nurse. The collection consists of various eras and types of invalid / infant feeders, infant milk bottles, medicine spoons, urinals and reference material.
Invalid feeders are designed to provide liquid or semi solid nourishment in time of illness or incapacity. There are many different shapes for invalid feeders. Some of the shapes are defined as infant or invalid feeders, however it seems that each manufacture used both terms interchangeably. The boat shaped, which looks very similar to a gravy boat, originally evolved from the pap boat shape. It has a straight spout, main opening in the top, and an open handle in the back. This is also known as an infant feeder prior to the development of baby milk bottles. Manufacturers would market this item as both invalid and infant feeders depending on the market they are targeting.
Images
Less detail
Dates
1880
1920
circa 1880-1920
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Treatment, General
Nursing
Accession Number
016001008
Description
White oval ceramic pap boat shaped invalid feeder hand painted floral design in green and orange along spout area with gilt trim along opening, middle of handle and spout; embossed floral design at spout area; open handle with flat raised piece on top with spout pointing straight ahead; without man…
  1 image  
Accession Number
016001008
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Treatment, General
Nursing
MeSH Heading
Feeding Methods
Home Health Nursing
MM= Anesthesia, Inhalation -- accessories
MM= Feeding Dish
Nursing Care -- instrumentation
Description
White oval ceramic pap boat shaped invalid feeder hand painted floral design in green and orange along spout area with gilt trim along opening, middle of handle and spout; embossed floral design at spout area; open handle with flat raised piece on top with spout pointing straight ahead; without manufacturers marks; small opening; spout opening is part of body; glazed base.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and Alice Roeder.
Dates
1880
1920
circa 1880-1920
Date Remarks
Research
Material
ceramic: white
paint: green, orange, tan
ink: gold
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1
Length
14.5 cm
Width
6.5 cm
Height
7.3 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Gilding worn
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Documents
Book
eBook
Internet
Reference Comments
Allison, Eileen Michael. Ceramic Invalid Feeders, Pap Boats, and Baby Bottles of the 19th & Twentieth Century. Canada: E.M. Allison, 1997.
Campbell, Gordon. The Grove Encyclopedia of Decorative Arts. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2006. 2006. Accessed August 18, 2016. http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780195189483.001.0001/acref-9780195189483
Donor file
Research Facts
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and sister Alice Roeder, a retired nurse. The collection consists of various eras and types of invalid / infant feeders, infant milk bottles, medicine spoons, urinals and reference material.
Invalid feeders are designed to provide liquid or semi solid nourishment in time of illness or incapacity. There are many different shapes for invalid feeders. Some of the shapes are defined as infant or invalid feeders, however it seems that each manufacture used both terms interchangeably. The boat shaped, which looks very similar to a gravy boat, originally evolved from the pap boat shape. It has a straight spout, main opening in the top, and an open handle in the back. This is also known as an infant feeder prior to the development of baby milk bottles. Manufacturers would market this item as both invalid and infant feeders depending on the market they are targeting.
Images
Less detail
Dates
1880
1920
circa 1880-1920
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Treatment, General
Nursing
Accession Number
016001011
Description
Oval white ceramic boat shaped invalid feeder; with raised rounded covered opening attached to spout; hand painted pink flowers with brown and grey leaves on top of covering and gold trim around the whole top of body; semi-circular flat small handle; spout opening and handle is part of body; glaze…
  1 image  
Accession Number
016001011
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Treatment, General
Nursing
MeSH Heading
Feeding Methods
Home Health Nursing
MM= Anesthesia, Inhalation -- accessories
MM= Feeding Dish
Nursing Care -- instrumentation
Description
Oval white ceramic boat shaped invalid feeder; with raised rounded covered opening attached to spout; hand painted pink flowers with brown and grey leaves on top of covering and gold trim around the whole top of body; semi-circular flat small handle; spout opening and handle is part of body; glazed base.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and Alice Roeder.
Dates
1880
1920
circa 1880-1920
Material
ceramic: white
ink: pink, brown, grey, gold
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1
Length
15.0 cm
Width
6.7 cm
Height
5.5 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Gold trim is faded, shows wear on the bottom, black dots around the inside
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Documents
Book
eBook
Internet
Reference Comments
Allison, Eileen Michael. Ceramic Invalid Feeders, Pap Boats, and Baby Bottles of the 19th & Twentieth Century. Canada: E. M. Allison, 1997.
Donor file
Research Facts
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and sister Alice Roeder, a retired nurse. The collection consists of various eras and types of invalid / infant feeders, infant milk bottles, medicine spoons, urinals and reference material.
Invalid feeders’ also known as sick cups are designed to provide liquid or semi solid nourishment in time of illness or incapacity. There are many different shapes for invalid feeders. Some of the shapes are defined as infant or invalid feeders, however it seems that each manufacture used both terms interchangeably depending on the market they are targeting.
Images
Less detail
Dates
1920
1950
circa 1920-1950
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Treatment, General
Nursing
Accession Number
016001018
Description
White cup shaped ceramic invalid feeder decorated with red transfer print Maltese cross on rounded half cover with a moustache shaped indent; spout attached on the lower half of the body and curves upwards, like a teapot; gilding around the perimeter edges, top opening, spout, and handle; single op…
  1 image  
Accession Number
016001018
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Treatment, General
Nursing
MeSH Heading
Feeding Methods
Home Health Nursing
MM= Anesthesia, Inhalation -- accessories
MM= Feeding Dish
Nursing Care -- instrumentation
Description
White cup shaped ceramic invalid feeder decorated with red transfer print Maltese cross on rounded half cover with a moustache shaped indent; spout attached on the lower half of the body and curves upwards, like a teapot; gilding around the perimeter edges, top opening, spout, and handle; single open handle; spout is at ninety degrees from the handle pointing straight ahead; printed manufacturer mark on base in gold "47".
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and Alice Roeder.
Dates
1920
1950
circa 1920-1950
Date Remarks
Research
Material
ceramic: white
ink: red, gold
Inscriptions
Printed on base: "47"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1
Length
11.1 cm
Width
10.1 cm
Height
7.6 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Gilding is worn in areas; four small dark spots under glaze on interior base
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Documents
Book
eBook
Internet
Reference Comments
Allison, Eileen Michael. Ceramic Invalid Feeders, Pap Boats, and Baby Bottles of the 19th & Twentieth Century. Canada: E.M. Allison, 1997.
Campbell, Gordon. The Grove Encyclopedia of Decorative Arts. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2006. 2006. Accessed August 18, 2016. http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780195189483.001.0001/acref-9780195189483
Donor file
Research Facts
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and sister Alice Roeder, a retired nurse. The collection consists of various eras and types of invalid / infant feeders, infant milk bottles, medicine spoons, urinals and reference material.
Invalid feeders are designed to provide liquid or semi solid nourishment in time of illness or incapacity. There are many different shapes for invalid feeders. Some of the shapes are defined as infant or invalid feeders, however it seems that each manufacture used both terms interchangeably. The boat shaped, which looks very similar to a gravy boat, originally evolved from the pap boat shape. It has a straight spout, main opening in the top, and an open handle in the back. This is also known as an infant feeder prior to the development of baby milk bottles. Manufacturers would market this item as both invalid and infant feeders depending on the market they are targeting.
The Maltese cross is a symbol that is most commonly associated with the Knights of Malta (also known as the Knights Hospitallers of St. John), who ruled the Maltese islands between 1530 and 1798.The Maltese cross is the symbol associated with the St John Ambulance organisation as their main form of identification.
Images
Less detail
Dates
1900
1930
circa 1900-1930
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Treatment, General
Nursing
Accession Number
016001020
Description
White cup shaped ceramic invalid feeder hand painted red cross over a brown outline double circle transfer print on rounded half cover with a moustache shaped indent; spout attached on the lower half of the body and curves upwards, like a teapot; gilding around the perimeter edges, top opening, spo…
  1 image  
Accession Number
016001020
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Treatment, General
Nursing
MeSH Heading
Feeding Methods
Home Health Nursing
MM= Anesthesia, Inhalation -- accessories
MM= Feeding Dish
Nursing Care -- instrumentation
Description
White cup shaped ceramic invalid feeder hand painted red cross over a brown outline double circle transfer print on rounded half cover with a moustache shaped indent; spout attached on the lower half of the body and curves upwards, like a teapot; gilding around the perimeter edges, top opening, spout, and handle; single open handle; spout is at ninety degrees from the handle pointing straight ahead.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and Alice Roeder.
Dates
1900
1930
circa 1900-1930
Date Remarks
Research
Material
ceramic: white
ink: red, gold, brown
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1
Length
14.6 cm
Width
12.1 cm
Height
7.8 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Gilding and transfer print worn; hairline fracture on the cover almost to edge between handle and spout
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Documents
Book
eBook
Internet
Reference Comments
Allison, Eileen Michael. Ceramic Invalid Feeders, Pap Boats, and Baby Bottles of the 19th & Twentieth Century. Canada: E.M. Allison, 1997.
Campbell, Gordon. The Grove Encyclopedia of Decorative Arts. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2006. 2006. Accessed August 18, 2016. http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780195189483.001.0001/acref-9780195189483
Donor file
Research Facts
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and sister Alice Roeder, a retired nurse. The collection consists of various eras and types of invalid / infant feeders, infant milk bottles, medicine spoons, urinals and reference material.
Invalid feeders are designed to provide liquid or semi solid nourishment in time of illness or incapacity. There are many different shapes for invalid feeders. Some of the shapes are defined as infant or invalid feeders, however it seems that each manufacture used both terms interchangeably. The boat shaped, which looks very similar to a gravy boat, originally evolved from the pap boat shape. It has a straight spout, main opening in the top, and an open handle in the back. This is also known as an infant feeder prior to the development of baby milk bottles. Manufacturers would market this item as both invalid and infant feeders depending on the market they are targeting.
The 1864 Geneva Convention introduced the red cross as the symbol of impartial medical relief during wartimes and disasters. The design was created from the Swiss flag in opposite colors to commemorate the Swiss advocate for the institution of this impartial aid and relief, Jean Henri Dunant. This popular symbol seems to have been superimposed on top of the glaze of many feeders after they were fired. One suggestion is that this meant that these were plain, utilitarian feeders were being repurposed for war times or for hospitals in times of need. In addition, these could be home painted decorative additions to feeders that were meant to be donated as part of charity missions in the early 20th century.
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