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Victorian baby bottle

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact14442
Dates
1880
1910
circa 1880-1910
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Pediatrics
Food, Fortified
Infant Food
Infant Nutrition
Classification
Home Health
Nutrition
Infant Food
Infant Nutrition
Accession Number
016001058
Description
Clear glass 'turtle' shaped infant feeding bottle with rounded bottom and angled neck for cork or rubber teat closure; visible mould line around edges; hand blown glass; front flat area with embossed measurement gradations on front.
  1 image  
Accession Number
016001058
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Pediatrics
Food, Fortified
Infant Food
Infant Nutrition
Classification
Home Health
Nutrition
Infant Food
Infant Nutrition
MeSH Heading
Infant Care
Infant Food
MM= Bottle Feeding -- bottle
Bottle Feeding -- instrumentation
Description
Clear glass 'turtle' shaped infant feeding bottle with rounded bottom and angled neck for cork or rubber teat closure; visible mould line around edges; hand blown glass; front flat area with embossed measurement gradations on front.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and Alice Roeder.
Dates
1880
1910
circa 1880-1910
Material
glass: transparent
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1
Length
16.4 cm
Width
9.0 cm
Depth
7.5 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Shows wear and interior with minor residue
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Documents Book Internet
Reference Comments
Allison, Eileen Michael. Ceramic Invalid Feeders, Pap Boats, and Baby Bottles of the 19th & Twentieth Century. Canada: E. M. Allison, 1997.; American Collectors of Infant Feeders
Research Facts
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and sister Alice Roeder, a retired nurse. The collection consists of various eras and types of invalid / infant feeders, infant milk bottles, medicine spoons, urinals and reference material.
Names associated with this item include: baby bottle, nurser, infant nursing bottle, antique baby bottles, glass baby Bottles, milk bottles, Victorian, Victorian baby, Victorian baby feeding bottle
The design of glass baby feeding bottles from 1860-1900 were hard to clean due to the glass screw or cork closures and long rubber tubes ending with rubber teats. This bottle design allowed the infant to self-feed.
This innovation freed the mother from the hassle and discomfort of nursing and wearing a nursing corset, and allowed her the opportunity to tend to her other chores (this was particularly useful for those members of the middle to lower classes who needed to work). A contributing factor to the deadly growth of bacteria throughout the bottle design was that these bottles were not sterilized, only washed every two or three weeks.
This lack of sanitation allowed for deadly bacteria to flourish, and lead to doctors condemning the use of these bottles – now nicknamed ‘Murder Bottles’ – as they contributed to the high infant mortality rates of the late 1800s (only two out of ten babies would survived until two years of age).
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Victorian baby bottle

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact14441
Dates
1891
1910
circa 1891-1910
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Pediatrics
Food, Fortified
Infant Food
Infant Nutrition
Classification
Home Health
Nutrition
Infant Food
Infant Nutrition
Accession Number
016001059
Description
Purple tinged clear glass 'turtle' shaped infant feeding bottle with rounded bottom and angled neck for cork or rubber teat closure; visible mould line around edges; hand blown glass; front flat area with embossed product name; measurement gradations on front cork in valve opening with minor miss…
  1 image  
Accession Number
016001059
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Pediatrics
Food, Fortified
Infant Food
Infant Nutrition
Classification
Home Health
Nutrition
Infant Food
Infant Nutrition
MeSH Heading
Infant Care
Infant Food
MM= Bottle Feeding -- bottle
Bottle Feeding -- instrumentation
Description
Purple tinged clear glass 'turtle' shaped infant feeding bottle with rounded bottom and angled neck for cork or rubber teat closure; visible mould line around edges; hand blown glass; front flat area with embossed product name; measurement gradations on front cork in valve opening with minor missing glass around edge.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and Alice Roeder.
Site Made (Country)
England
Dates
1891
1910
circa 1891-1910
Material
glass: transparent
Inscriptions
Embossed on feeder: "FLUID OUNCES // THE BEST // PAT. SEP 1. 91 // THE GOTHAM CO. N.Y."
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1
Length
17.5 cm
Width
9.0 cm
Depth
6.5 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Cork shows wear and missing minor amount; interior with minor residue
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Documents Book Internet
Reference Comments
Allison, Eileen Michael. Ceramic Invalid Feeders, Pap Boats, and Baby Bottles of the 19th & Twentieth Century. Canada: E. M. Allison, 1997.; American Collectors of Infant Feeders
Research Facts
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and sister Alice Roeder, a retired nurse. The collection consists of various eras and types of invalid / infant feeders, infant milk bottles, medicine spoons, urinals and reference material.
Names associated with this item include: baby bottle, nurser, infant nursing bottle, antique baby bottles, glass baby Bottles, milk bottles, Victorian, Victorian baby, Victorian baby feeding bottle
The design of glass baby feeding bottles from 1860-1900 were hard to clean due to the glass screw or cork closures and long rubber tubes ending with rubber teats. This bottle design allowed the infant to self-feed.
This innovation freed the mother from the hassle and discomfort of nursing and wearing a nursing corset, and allowed her the opportunity to tend to her other chores (this was particularly useful for those members of the middle to lower classes who needed to work). A contributing factor to the deadly growth of bacteria throughout the bottle design was that these bottles were not sterilized, only washed every two or three weeks.
This lack of sanitation allowed for deadly bacteria to flourish, and lead to doctors condemning the use of these bottles – now nicknamed ‘Murder Bottles’ – as they contributed to the high infant mortality rates of the late 1800s (only two out of ten babies would survived until two years of age).
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Victorian baby bottle

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact14440
Dates
1880
1910
circa 1880-1910
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Pediatrics
Food, Fortified
Infant Food
Infant Nutrition
Classification
Home Health
Nutrition
Infant Food
Infant Nutrition
Accession Number
016001060 a-b
Description
Two piece clear glass 'turtle' shaped infant feeding bottle (a) with separate clear glass screw (b) with centre hole for rubber tube, tube missing; squared off bottom with angled neck threaded to receive screw closure; visible mould line around edges; hand blown glass; front flat area with embosse…
  1 image  
Accession Number
016001060 a-b
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Pediatrics
Food, Fortified
Infant Food
Infant Nutrition
Classification
Home Health
Nutrition
Infant Food
Infant Nutrition
MeSH Heading
Infant Care
Infant Food
MM= Bottle Feeding -- bottle
Bottle Feeding -- instrumentation
Description
Two piece clear glass 'turtle' shaped infant feeding bottle (a) with separate clear glass screw (b) with centre hole for rubber tube, tube missing; squared off bottom with angled neck threaded to receive screw closure; visible mould line around edges; hand blown glass; front flat area with embossed product name.
Number Of Parts
2
Part Names
a - bottle
b - screw
Provenance
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and Alice Roeder.
Site Made (Country)
England
Dates
1880
1910
circa 1880-1910
Material
glass: transparent
Inscriptions
Embossed on feeder: "IMPROVED // FEEDING BOTTLE"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1
Length
a - 15.7 cm
b - 3.1 cm
Width
a - 10.0 cm
Depth
a - 7.5 cm
Diameter
b - 3.3 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Documents Book Internet
Reference Comments
Allison, Eileen Michael. Ceramic Invalid Feeders, Pap Boats, and Baby Bottles of the 19th & Twentieth Century. Canada: E. M. Allison, 1997.; American Collectors of Infant Feeders
Research Facts
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and sister Alice Roeder, a retired nurse. The collection consists of various eras and types of invalid / infant feeders, infant milk bottles, medicine spoons, urinals and reference material.
Names associated with this item include: baby bottle, nurser, infant nursing bottle, antique baby bottles, glass baby Bottles, milk bottles, Victorian, Victorian baby, Victorian baby feeding bottle
The design of glass baby feeding bottles from 1860-1900 were hard to clean due to the glass screw or cork closures and long rubber tubes ending with rubber teats. This bottle design allowed the infant to self-feed.
This innovation freed the mother from the hassle and discomfort of nursing and wearing a nursing corset, and allowed her the opportunity to tend to her other chores (this was particularly useful for those members of the middle to lower classes who needed to work). A contributing factor to the deadly growth of bacteria throughout the bottle design was that these bottles were not sterilized, only washed every two or three weeks.
This lack of sanitation allowed for deadly bacteria to flourish, and lead to doctors condemning the use of these bottles – now nicknamed ‘Murder Bottles’ – as they contributed to the high infant mortality rates of the late 1800s (only two out of ten babies would survived until two years of age).
Images
Less detail

Victorian baby bottle

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact14437
Dates
1880
1910
circa 1880-1910
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Pediatrics
Food, Fortified
Infant Food
Infant Nutrition
Classification
Home Health
Nutrition
Infant Food
Infant Nutrition
Accession Number
016001061 a-b
Description
Two piece clear glass 'turtle' shaped infant feeding bottle (a) with separate clear glass screw (b) with centre hole for rubber tube, tube missing; squared off bottom with angled neck threaded to receive screw; visible mould line around edges; embossed lines to indicate mesurements in tablespoons …
  2 images  
Accession Number
016001061 a-b
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Pediatrics
Food, Fortified
Infant Food
Infant Nutrition
Classification
Home Health
Nutrition
Infant Food
Infant Nutrition
MeSH Heading
Infant Care
Infant Food
MM= Bottle Feeding -- bottle
Bottle Feeding -- instrumentation
Description
Two piece clear glass 'turtle' shaped infant feeding bottle (a) with separate clear glass screw (b) with centre hole for rubber tube, tube missing; squared off bottom with angled neck threaded to receive screw; visible mould line around edges; embossed lines to indicate mesurements in tablespoons up to 18; front flat area with circular embossed product name.
Number Of Parts
2
Part Names
a - bottle
b - screw
Provenance
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and Alice Roeder.
Site Made (Country)
England
Dates
1880
1910
circa 1880-1910
Material
glass: transparent
Inscriptions
Embossed on feeder: "THE PRINCESS OF WALES FEEDING BOTTLE // MADE IN ENGLAND // TABLESPOONS"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1
Length
a - 13.7 cm
b - 3.1 cm
Width
a - 10.0 cm
Depth
a - 7.5 cm
Diameter
b - 3.3 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Documents Book Internet
Reference Comments
Allison, Eileen Michael. Ceramic Invalid Feeders, Pap Boats, and Baby Bottles of the 19th & Twentieth Century. Canada: E. M. Allison, 1997.; American Collectors of Infant Feeders
Research Facts
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and sister Alice Roeder, a retired nurse. The collection consists of various eras and types of invalid / infant feeders, infant milk bottles, medicine spoons, urinals and reference material.
The design of glass baby feeding bottles from 1860-1900 were hard to clean due to the glass screw or cork closures and long rubber tubes ending with rubber teats. This bottle design allowed the infant to self-feed.
This innovation freed the mother from the hassle and discomfort of nursing and wearing a nursing corset, and allowed her the opportunity to tend to her other chores (this was particularly useful for those members of the middle to lower classes who needed to work). A contributing factor to the deadly growth of bacteria throughout the bottle design was that these bottles were not sterilized, only washed every two or three weeks.
This lack of sanitation allowed for deadly bacteria to flourish, and lead to doctors condemning the use of these bottles – now nicknamed ‘Murder Bottles’ – as they contributed to the high infant mortality rates of the late 1800s (only two out of ten babies would survived until two years of age).
Exhibit History
On display for exhibit "Gananoque 150" L-2017-6 at Arthur Child Heritage Museum; 24 April 2017 - 26 Aug 2017
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Victorian baby bottle

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact14436
Dates
1900
1920
circa 1900-1920
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Pediatrics
Food, Fortified
Infant Food
Infant Nutrition
Classification
Home Health
Nutrition
Infant Food
Infant Nutrition
Accession Number
016001062
Description
Clear glass torpedo boat shaped feeding or infant bottle with cork stuck in raised thick circular opening; one closed squared off end and small narrow opening to affix a rubber teat; missing teat; micro bubbles visable in glass with several larger bubbles.
  1 image  
Accession Number
016001062
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Pediatrics
Food, Fortified
Infant Food
Infant Nutrition
Classification
Home Health
Nutrition
Infant Food
Infant Nutrition
MeSH Heading
Infant Care
Infant Food
MM= Bottle Feeding -- bottle
Bottle Feeding -- instrumentation
Feeding Methods
Description
Clear glass torpedo boat shaped feeding or infant bottle with cork stuck in raised thick circular opening; one closed squared off end and small narrow opening to affix a rubber teat; missing teat; micro bubbles visable in glass with several larger bubbles.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and Alice Roeder.
Dates
1900
1920
circa 1900-1920
Material
glass: transparent
cork: tan
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-B3
Length
22.3 cm
Width
7.3 cm
Height
6.4 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Cork dried out and stuck fast in opening
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Documents Book
Reference Comments
Allison, Eileen Michael. Ceramic Invalid Feeders, Pap Boats, and Baby Bottles of the 19th & Twentieth Century. Canada: E.M. Allison, 1997. "Down Bros. Ltd. Catalogue of Surgical Instruments & Appliances" by Down Bros. Ltd., London, 1906, p. 1363 similar to item #6031 Donor file
Research Facts
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and sister Alice Roeder, a retired nurse. The collection consists of various eras and types of invalid / infant feeders, infant milk bottles, medicine spoons, urinals and reference material.
Images
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Grip-tight [Victorian baby bottle]

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact14438
Dates
1945
1955
circa 1945-1955
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Pediatrics
Food, Fortified
Infant Food
Infant Nutrition
Classification
Home Health
Nutrition
Infant Food
Infant Nutrition
Accession Number
016001063 a-d
Description
Clear glass 'banana' style 'Grip-tight' infant feeder (a) with open ends for rubber teat (c) and rubber valve (d) at opposite ends in original product box (b); orange rubber valve and teat with stamped product name; box with drawing of naked infant on pillow and bottle sowing placement of teat and …
  1 image  
Accession Number
016001063 a-d
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Pediatrics
Food, Fortified
Infant Food
Infant Nutrition
Classification
Home Health
Nutrition
Infant Food
Infant Nutrition
MeSH Heading
Infant Care
Infant Food
MM= Bottle Feeding -- bottle
Bottle Feeding -- instrumentation
Description
Clear glass 'banana' style 'Grip-tight' infant feeder (a) with open ends for rubber teat (c) and rubber valve (d) at opposite ends in original product box (b); orange rubber valve and teat with stamped product name; box with drawing of naked infant on pillow and bottle sowing placement of teat and valve includes instructions.
Number Of Parts
4
Part Names
a - bottle
b - box
c - rubber teat
d - ruber valve
Provenance
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and Alice Roeder.
Maker
Grip-tight
Site Made (Country)
England
Dates
1945
1955
circa 1945-1955
Material
glass: transparent
paper: white
ink: turquoise, ornage, yellow, black
rubber: tan
Inscriptions
Embossed on bottle: "Grip-tight"; printed on box: "Grip-tight / FEEDER // fluid ounces // HEAT STERILISING in the following way will not harm the bottle: place // the feeder in a saucepan of cold // water, which should then be boiled for about five minutes. // FEEDTEATS and VALVES // ARE EXCEPTIONALLY LONG LASTING // AWARDED DIPLOMA OF THE ROYAL INSTITUTE OF PUBLIC HEALTH AND HYGIENE // Atomspheric and other influences may effect the sizes and the functioning of the // feed hole in the teat and the air vent in the valve. // If the food does not flow satisfactorily, remove the valve periodically for a few moments to admit air, but if this is not effective enlarge the feed hole in the following way: // Fix the teat on a feeder which then place on a table; secure a cork on the eye end of a thin needle, the point of which should be then made red-hot; quickly and // carefully insert the red-hot point into the hole of the teat and withdraw promptly. // the bottle shoudl be kept steady and the right arm holding the needle should // be supported on some object of convenient height and size. // MADE IN ENGLAND // COMPLETE // WITH TEAT // AND VALVE"; printed on rubber items: "Grip-tight // MADE IN ENGLAND"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1
Length
a - 18.6 cm
b - 19.3 cm
c - 4.3 cm
d - 2.3 cm
Width
a - 7.8 cm
b - 7.0 cm
Depth
a - 5.6 cm
b - 7.0 cm
Diameter
c - 2.0 cm
d - 2.1 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Documents Book Internet
Reference Comments
Allison, Eileen Michael. Ceramic Invalid Feeders, Pap Boats, and Baby Bottles of the 19th & Twentieth Century. Canada: E. M. Allison, 1997.; American Collectors of Infant Feeders
Research Facts
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and sister Alice Roeder, a retired nurse. The collection consists of various eras and types of invalid / infant feeders, infant milk bottles, medicine spoons, urinals and reference material.
Names associated with this item include: baby bottle, nurser, infant nursing bottle, antique baby bottles, glass baby Bottles, milk bottles, Victorian, Victorian baby, Victorian baby feeding bottle
Though the ‘Murder Bottle’ design of early glass and rubber infant feeders were unsanitary was outlawed by Buffalo, New York by 1897, they continued to be bought and used widely into the 1920s. A new elongated baby bottle with openings on both end of the bottle was created in 1894 called the ‘Banana Bottle’ or ‘The Allenbury Feeder’ that was easier to clean. It has been referred to as a ‘saviour’ due to it being the most hygienic bottle design on the market at the time, and was used into the 1950s.
Images
Less detail
Dates
1930
1950
circa 1930-1950
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Pediatrics
Classification
Pediatrics
Paediatrics
Home Health Care
Accession Number
016001075 a-b
Description
English pattern style Seiberling breast pump (a) with wired on red rubber bulb in original box (b); cylindrical glass breast pump which has a round flattened section at one end, a holding area within the pump to collect milk and a small opening at the other end onto which a red rubber bulb belongs;…
  1 image  
Accession Number
016001075 a-b
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Pediatrics
Classification
Pediatrics
Paediatrics
Home Health Care
MeSH Heading
Breast Feeding
Child Nutrition
Infant Care
Infant Food
Description
English pattern style Seiberling breast pump (a) with wired on red rubber bulb in original box (b); cylindrical glass breast pump which has a round flattened section at one end, a holding area within the pump to collect milk and a small opening at the other end onto which a red rubber bulb belongs; green and black box with three flying Canada goose graphics on side of box.
Number Of Parts
2
Part Names
a - pump
b - box
Provenance
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and Alice Roeder.
Site Made (Country)
Label on box reads: "Seiberling Breast Pump No. P476 Made in Canada Wired-on Bulb. Seiberling Rubber Company of Canada Ltd."
Dates
1930
1950
circa 1930-1950
Material
paper: tan
ink: green, black
glass: clear
rubber: red, black
Inscriptions
Printed on box: "SEIBERLING // BREAST // PUMP // WIRED ON BULB // ONE No. 476 // Made in Canada // SEIBERLING RUBBER CO. // OF CANADA LIMITED"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D7-9
Length
a - 6.2 cm
b - 6.5 cm
Width
a - 6.2 cm
b - 6.5 cm
Height
a - 13.4 cm
b - 14.2 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Box bottom on ine side is crushed and repaired, seam separated & repaired
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Documents Book eBook Internet
Reference Comments
Donor file
Research Facts
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and sister Alice Roeder, a retired nurse. The large collection was made up of invalid feeders, hot water bottles, and urinals.
Images
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7 records – page 1 of 1.