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nurse's uniform cuffs

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact639
Dates
1907
1910
circa 1907-1910
Collection
Kingston General Hospital School of Nursing Alumnae Collection
Category
Nursing
Nursing Uniforms
Classification
Nursing
Nursing Uniforms
Accession Number
995002019 a-b
Description
White starched cuffs belonging to Ann Baillie; with Ann Baillie's signature to interior
  1 image  
Accession Number
995002019 a-b
Author
Anne Baillie
Collection
Kingston General Hospital School of Nursing Alumnae Collection
Category
Nursing
Nursing Uniforms
Classification
Nursing
Nursing Uniforms
MeSH Heading
Clothing
Textiles
MM= Clothing -- accessory -- nursing
Description
White starched cuffs belonging to Ann Baillie; with Ann Baillie's signature to interior
Number Of Parts
2
Part Names
a - Size: Length 10.5 cm. x Diameter 7.0 cm.
b - Size:
Provenance
Cuffs worn by Ann Baillie during student days
Dates
1907
1910
circa 1907-1910
Date Remarks
Date of Ann Baillie's student days
Material
fabric: white
Inscriptions
Signature to interior: "A. Baillie"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-C6-3
Temporary Location
To exhibit: "For Service to Humanity", Nursing Gallery: Showcase West, Museum of Health Care, 13 Nov. 2008.
Condition Remarks
No damage from being on exhibit; suitable to put back on exhibit
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Person
Article
Websites
Reference Comments
Marilyn Boston, "Info Re KGH Nursing Uniforms"
Canadian Museum of History, "Symbol of a Profession: One Hundred Years of Nurses' Caps," https://www.historymuseum.ca/cmc/exhibitions/hist/infirm/inint01e.html
"For Service to Humanity: Nursing Education at Kingston General Hospital," Museum of Health Care. https://www.museumofhealthcare.ca/explore/exhibitions/forservicetohumanity.html
Andrea Melvin, “Badges of Honour or Devices of Control?: Nursing Uniforms at Kingston General Hospital Training School for Nurses,” Dr. Margaret Angus Research Fellowship, 2008. Museum of Health Care at Kingston.
Research Facts
Throughout the twentieth century, nurses' uniforms changed, in particular with the rising of hemlines. The nurse's uniform was generally white, and Kingston General Hospital uniforms were once known for "turkey red" hemlines. Different levels of nursing education had different uniforms, in particular different caps, as graduate nurses had black bands on their caps to indicate their level of education. Nurse’s uniforms had many elements, and some had detachable collars, bibs, and cuffs. Nurses would often remove their cuffs when they got in the way of tasks, but would put them immediately back on when superiors or the public were around.
Exhibit History
09/1995 - Jan. 19 2001, Hall of Honour; on exhibit at Museum, Jan. 22, 2001-June 9, 2008.
Images
Less detail
Dates
1900
1930
circa 1900-1930
Collection
Kingston General Hospital School of Nursing Alumnae Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Hygiene
Classification
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Bedpan
Home Health Care
Accession Number
995002026
Description
Off-white ceramic oval bedpan with circular spout at the top back.
  1 image  
Accession Number
995002026
Collection
Kingston General Hospital School of Nursing Alumnae Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Hygiene
Classification
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Bedpan
Home Health Care
MeSH Heading
Toilet Facilities
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Description
Off-white ceramic oval bedpan with circular spout at the top back.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Ruth Wallace, Kingston General Hospital School of Nursing class of 1931.
Dates
1900
1930
circa 1900-1930
Material
ceramic: off-white
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0007
0007-N1-3
Length
40.0 cm
Width
23.0 cm
Depth
11.0 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Dimension Notes
Length: 40.0 cm. x Width: 23.0 cm. x Depth: 11.0 cm.
Condition Remarks
Shows little wear; some staining; small chips on spout and 2 cracks (1.25 and 1.0); hairline crack (1.0); base shows evidence of wear on the edges
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Person
Website
Article
Reference Comments
American Association for the History of Nursing, https://www.aahn.org/bedpans#:~:text=Porcelain%2C%20china%2C%20and%20even%20pottery,enamel%20and%20then%20stainless%20steel.&text=Today%20these%20antique%20bedpans%20are,be%20found%20in%20antique%20stores.
Cassandra Good, “The Strange Saga of George Washington’s Bedpan,” August 20th, 2015. Smithsonian Magazine. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/strange-saga-george-washingtons-bedpan-180956347/
Barb (Earl) Gilbert, Kingston General Hospital Nursing School graduate class of 1963, and daughter of Ruth Wallace.
Research Facts
Before the late nineteenth century, bedpans and similar objects were made of metals such as pewter, brass, and sometimes even glass. By the late nineteenth century, porcelain, china, and pottery were used. As the 20th century dawned, bedpans, urinals, basins, etc. were made of enamel and later stainless steel. In the 1960s, there was a shift towards plastics and other disposables.
The bedpan was designed for people who could not or should not rise from their beds to relieve themselves. A bedpan could be lightly heated and placed under the covers of the beds of the elderly, people who were ill, and women recovering from childbirth so that they would not have to get out of bed. They were routinely emptied by caregivers, nurses, etc.
This bedpan style is a "slipper" type, later referred to as a fracture bedpan and can be slipped under the patient. The spout is to facilitate washing it out. Fracture bedpans are smaller than standard size bedpans, and have one flat end. This bedpan style is designed specifically for patients who are bedridden and have limited movement to use a standard style bedpan.
Images
Less detail
Dates
1905
1930
circa 1905-1930
Collection
Kingston General Hospital School of Nursing Alumnae Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Hygiene
Classification
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Bedpan
Home Health Care
Accession Number
995002027
Description
White enameled oval bedpan with blue-lined edges.
  1 image  
Accession Number
995002027
Collection
Kingston General Hospital School of Nursing Alumnae Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Hygiene
Classification
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Bedpan
Home Health Care
MeSH Heading
Toilet Facilities
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Description
White enameled oval bedpan with blue-lined edges.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Ruth Wallace, graduate of Kingston General Hospital School of Nursing class of 1931.
Dates
1905
1930
circa 1905-1930
Material
metal:
enamel: off-white; blue
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0007
0007-N1-4
Temporary Location
On display "Doctor's Treatment Room c1930" at Museum of Health Care 20 Feb 2016.
Length
36.0 cm
Width
29.0 cm
Depth
7.0 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Dimension Notes
Length: 36.0 cm. x Width: 29.0 cm. x Depth: 7.0 cm.
Condition Remarks
Shows negligible wear; slightly scratched at bottom front
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Person
Website
Article
Reference Comments
American Association for the History of Nursing, https://www.aahn.org/bedpans#:~:text=Porcelain%2C%20china%2C%20and%20even%20pottery,enamel%20and%20then%20stainless%20steel.&text=Today%20these%20antique%20bedpans%20are,be%20found%20in%20antique%20stores.
Cassandra Good, “The Strange Saga of George Washington’s Bedpan,” August 20th, 2015. Smithsonian Magazine. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/strange-saga-george-washingtons-bedpan-180956347/
Barb (Earl) Gilbert, graduate of Kingston General Hospital School of Nursing class of 1963 and daughter of Ruth Wallace
Research Facts
Before the late nineteenth century, bedpans and similar objects were made of metals such as pewter, brass, and sometimes even glass. By the late nineteenth century, porcelain, china, and pottery were used. As the 20th century dawned, bedpans, urinals, basins, etc. were made of enamel and later stainless steel. In the 1960s, there was a shift towards plastics and other disposables.
The bedpan was designed for people who could not or should not rise from their beds to relieve themselves. A bedpan could be lightly heated and placed under the covers of the beds of the elderly, people who were ill, and women recovering from childbirth so that they would not have to get out of bed. They were routinely emptied by caregivers, nurses, etc.
Images
Less detail
Dates
1890
1920
circa 1890-1920
Collection
Kingston General Hospital School of Nursing Alumnae Collection
Category
Diagnostic & Treatment Artifacts
Classification
Gynaecology
Accession Number
995002035
Description
Cylindrical angled vulcanite hollow tube shaped at one end to allow the attachment of a tube and rounded with 8 perforations at the other end (the tip).
  1 image  
Accession Number
995002035
Collection
Kingston General Hospital School of Nursing Alumnae Collection
Category
Diagnostic & Treatment Artifacts
Classification
Gynaecology
MeSH Heading
MM= Irrigation -- irrigator -- vaginal
Description
Cylindrical angled vulcanite hollow tube shaped at one end to allow the attachment of a tube and rounded with 8 perforations at the other end (the tip).
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Ruth Wallace, Kingston General Hospital School of Nursing Alumnae Class of 1931 graduate.
Dates
1890
1920
circa 1890-1920
Material
plastic: black
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D8-10
Dimension Notes
Length: 15.5 cm. x Diam. : 14.0 mm.
Condition Remarks
Plastic shows no signs of deterioration
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Person
Reference Comments
Barb (Earl) Gilbert (1963 KGH Nursing graduate and daughter of Ruth Wallace)
Images
Less detail

Kingston General Hospital School of Nursing 1886 – [graduates lists]

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact718
Dates
1886
1974
circa 1886-1974
Collection
Kingston General Hospital School of Nursing Alumnae Collection
Category
Archival Items
Administrative
Nursing
Classification
Education
Archival
Administrative
Nursing
Accession Number
995002098
Description
Numerous typed and hand-written lists contained in a leather-covered, 3-ring, zippered binder have the names of all Kingston General Hospital School of Nursing graduates; the lists consist of 86 typewritten pages (with added hand-written notes) containing information on all of the Kingston General …
  2 images  
Accession Number
995002098
Collection
Kingston General Hospital School of Nursing Alumnae Collection
Category
Archival Items
Administrative
Nursing
Classification
Education
Archival
Administrative
Nursing
MeSH Heading
Nurses -- registers
Education
Archival
Nursing
Description
Numerous typed and hand-written lists contained in a leather-covered, 3-ring, zippered binder have the names of all Kingston General Hospital School of Nursing graduates; the lists consist of 86 typewritten pages (with added hand-written notes) containing information on all of the Kingston General Hospital Nursing graduates, matrons, superintendants, and directors of nursing; there is also a pocket in the inside front of the binder with extra information and 7 graduation leaflets.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Sylvia Mary Burkinshaw, Acting Director of Nursing at Kingston General Hospital School of Nursing, March 1961; Director of Nursing 1968-1971.
Dates
1886
1974
circa 1886-1974
Date Remarks
last date of entry 1974
Material
leather: black
metal: silver
paper: white
ink: yellow
cardboard: grey
Inscriptions
Stamped on front: "Kingston General Hospital // School of Nursing // 1886 –"; front inside pocket of binder stamped with the words, "RB36 London Brand English Morocco"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 2005
2005-1-3
Length
34.7 cm
Width
28.6 cm
Depth
8.5 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Dimension Notes
Length: 34.7 cm. x Width: 28.6 cm. x Depth: 8.5 cm.
Condition Remarks
The binder holding the transcript is worn in several spots -- especially along the spine; pages within the transcript are torn (especially the first two pages); written information is legible and the paper is flexible and can be handled with care.
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Person
Website
Reference Comments
Marilyn Boston
Kingston Health Sciences Centre website, "KGH School of Nursing," (https://kingstonhsc.ca/kgh-school-nursing)
Research Facts
The first official graduating class of the Kingston General Hospital School of Nursing was in 1888; the school was created in order to educate nurses as the demand for them increased, as well as providing a labour force to the hospital. When the first nurses graduated, they were given a certificate of completion, twenty five dollars, and a nursing medal. Over the years, nurses were sometimes given pins and/or rings or other memorabilia to commemorate their graduation from the school.
Exhibit History
Kingston General Hospital School of Nursing Alumnae 2005 Special exhibit, Museum of Health Care, 20 May 2005-24 June 2005-Aug. 30, 2006
Images
Less detail
Dates
1900
1930
circa 1900-1930
Collection
Kingston General Hospital School of Nursing Alumnae Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Hygiene
Classification
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Bedpan
Home Health Care
Accession Number
995002107 a-b
Description
Slipper-shaped, hollow enamel bedpan (a), rounded at front and tapering at the back with a closed, squared end; open cylindrical spout at front; round opening on top that is covered with (b) a lid, which is round with a knob on top; lip on inside of lid.
  2 images  
Accession Number
995002107 a-b
Collection
Kingston General Hospital School of Nursing Alumnae Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Hygiene
Classification
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Bedpan
Home Health Care
MeSH Heading
Toilet Facilities
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Bedpan
Description
Slipper-shaped, hollow enamel bedpan (a), rounded at front and tapering at the back with a closed, squared end; open cylindrical spout at front; round opening on top that is covered with (b) a lid, which is round with a knob on top; lip on inside of lid.
Number Of Parts
2
Part Names
a - bedpan - Size: Length 47.5 cm x Width 30.5 cm x Depth 10.6 cm
b - lid - Size: Depth 4.8 cm x Diam. 20.8 cm
Provenance
Owned by Noreen Leishman, graduate of the Kingston General Hospital School of Nursing, class of 1950, belonged to "Pokey," a relative; apparently also a relative of Marg Polk.
Site Made (Country)
Austria
Dates
1900
1930
circa 1900-1930
Material
metal: dark grey, brown
enamel: dark grey, light grey
Inscriptions
Stamped in bottom: "AUSTRIA"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0007
0007-N1-1
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Enamel chipped at edges and metal shows some inactive corrosion.
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Book
Website
Article
Reference Comments
American Association for the History of Nursing, https://www.aahn.org/bedpans#:~:text=Porcelain%2C%20china%2C%20and%20even%20pottery,enamel%20and%20then%20stainless%20steel.&text=Today%20these%20antique%20bedpans%20are,be%20found%20in%20antique%20stores.
Cassandra Good, “The Strange Saga of George Washington’s Bedpan,” August 20th, 2015. Smithsonian Magazine. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/strange-saga-george-washingtons-bedpan-180956347/
"Hospital & Physicians Equipment and Supplies," by J.F. Hartz Co., 1960, p. 269
Research Facts
Before the late nineteenth century, bedpans and similar objects were made of metals such as pewter, brass, and sometimes even glass. By the late nineteenth century, porcelain, china, and pottery were used. As the 20th century dawned, bedpans, urinals, basins, etc. were made of enamel and later stainless steel. In the 1960s, there was a shift towards plastics and other disposables.
The bedpan was designed for people who could not or should not rise from their beds to relieve themselves of human waste. A bedpan could be lightly heated and placed under the covers of the beds of the elderly, people who were ill, and women recovering from childbirth so that they would not have to get out of bed. They were routinely emptied by caregivers, nurses, etc.
This bedpan style is a "slipper" type, later referred to as a fracture bedpan and can be slipped under the patient. The spout is to facilitate washing it out. Fracture bedpans are smaller than standard size bedpans, and have one flat end. This bedpan style is designed specifically for patients who are bedridden and have limited movement to use a standard style bedpan.
Images
Less detail
Dates
1900
1930
circa 1900-1930
Collection
Kingston General Hospital School of Nursing Alumnae Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Hygiene
Classification
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Bedpan
Home Health Care
Accession Number
995002108 a-b
Description
Slipper-shaped, hollow enamel bedpan (a), rounded at front and tapering at the back with a closed, squared end; open cylindrical spout at front; round opening on top that is covered with (b) a lid, which is round with a knob on top; lip on inside of lid.
  4 images  
Accession Number
995002108 a-b
Collection
Kingston General Hospital School of Nursing Alumnae Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Hygiene
Classification
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Bedpan
Home Health Care
MeSH Heading
Toilet Facilities
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Description
Slipper-shaped, hollow enamel bedpan (a), rounded at front and tapering at the back with a closed, squared end; open cylindrical spout at front; round opening on top that is covered with (b) a lid, which is round with a knob on top; lip on inside of lid.
Number Of Parts
2
Part Names
a - bedpan - Size: Length 48.5 cm x Width 32.5 cm x Depth 12.5 cm
b - lid - Size: Depth 3.8 cm x Diameter 20.0 cm
Provenance
Donated by Betty Black; owned by friend's aunt.
Dates
1900
1930
circa 1900-1930
Material
metal: silver; brown
enamel: dark blue; grey; black; white
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0007
0007-N1-2
Condition Remarks
Enamel chipped at edges and metal shows some inactive corrosion.
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Website
Article
Book
Reference Comments
American Association for the History of Nursing, https://www.aahn.org/bedpans#:~:text=Porcelain%2C%20china%2C%20and%20even%20pottery,enamel%20and%20then%20stainless%20steel.&text=Today%20these%20antique%20bedpans%20are,be%20found%20in%20antique%20stores.
Cassandra Good, “The Strange Saga of George Washington’s Bedpan,” August 20th, 2015. Smithsonian Magazine. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/strange-saga-george-washingtons-bedpan-180956347/
"Hospital & Physicians Equipment and Supplies," by J.F. Hartz Co., 1960, p. 269
Research Facts
Before the late nineteenth century, bedpans and similar objects were made of metals such as pewter, brass, and sometimes even glass. By the late nineteenth century, porcelain, china, and pottery were used. As the 20th century dawned, bedpans, urinals, basins, etc. were made of enamel and later stainless steel. In the 1960s, there was a shift towards plastics and other disposables.
The bedpan was designed for people who could not or should not rise from their beds to relieve themselves. A bedpan could be lightly heated and placed under the covers of the beds of the elderly, people who were ill, and women recovering from childbirth so that they would not have to get out of bed. They were routinely emptied by caregivers, nurses, etc.
This bedpan style is a "slipper" type, later referred to as a fracture bedpan and can be slipped under the patient. The spout is to facilitate washing it out. Fracture bedpans are smaller than standard size bedpans, and have one flat end. This bedpan style is designed specifically for patients who are bedridden and have limited movement to use a standard style bedpan.
Images
Less detail

7 records – page 1 of 1.