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203 records – page 1 of 21.

Dates
1900
1930
circa 1900-1930
Collection
Kingston General Hospital School of Nursing Alumnae Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Hygiene
Classification
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Bedpan
Home Health Care
Accession Number
995002026
Description
Off-white ceramic oval bedpan with circular spout at the top back.
  1 image  
Accession Number
995002026
Collection
Kingston General Hospital School of Nursing Alumnae Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Hygiene
Classification
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Bedpan
Home Health Care
MeSH Heading
Toilet Facilities
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Description
Off-white ceramic oval bedpan with circular spout at the top back.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Ruth Wallace, Kingston General Hospital School of Nursing class of 1931.
Dates
1900
1930
circa 1900-1930
Material
ceramic: off-white
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0007
0007-N1-3
Length
40.0 cm
Width
23.0 cm
Depth
11.0 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Dimension Notes
Length: 40.0 cm. x Width: 23.0 cm. x Depth: 11.0 cm.
Condition Remarks
Shows little wear; some staining; small chips on spout and 2 cracks (1.25 and 1.0); hairline crack (1.0); base shows evidence of wear on the edges
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Person
Website
Article
Reference Comments
American Association for the History of Nursing, https://www.aahn.org/bedpans#:~:text=Porcelain%2C%20china%2C%20and%20even%20pottery,enamel%20and%20then%20stainless%20steel.&text=Today%20these%20antique%20bedpans%20are,be%20found%20in%20antique%20stores.
Cassandra Good, “The Strange Saga of George Washington’s Bedpan,” August 20th, 2015. Smithsonian Magazine. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/strange-saga-george-washingtons-bedpan-180956347/
Barb (Earl) Gilbert, Kingston General Hospital Nursing School graduate class of 1963, and daughter of Ruth Wallace.
Research Facts
Before the late nineteenth century, bedpans and similar objects were made of metals such as pewter, brass, and sometimes even glass. By the late nineteenth century, porcelain, china, and pottery were used. As the 20th century dawned, bedpans, urinals, basins, etc. were made of enamel and later stainless steel. In the 1960s, there was a shift towards plastics and other disposables.
The bedpan was designed for people who could not or should not rise from their beds to relieve themselves. A bedpan could be lightly heated and placed under the covers of the beds of the elderly, people who were ill, and women recovering from childbirth so that they would not have to get out of bed. They were routinely emptied by caregivers, nurses, etc.
This bedpan style is a "slipper" type, later referred to as a fracture bedpan and can be slipped under the patient. The spout is to facilitate washing it out. Fracture bedpans are smaller than standard size bedpans, and have one flat end. This bedpan style is designed specifically for patients who are bedridden and have limited movement to use a standard style bedpan.
Images
Less detail
Dates
1905
1930
circa 1905-1930
Collection
Kingston General Hospital School of Nursing Alumnae Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Hygiene
Classification
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Bedpan
Home Health Care
Accession Number
995002027
Description
White enameled oval bedpan with blue-lined edges.
  1 image  
Accession Number
995002027
Collection
Kingston General Hospital School of Nursing Alumnae Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Hygiene
Classification
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Bedpan
Home Health Care
MeSH Heading
Toilet Facilities
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Description
White enameled oval bedpan with blue-lined edges.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Ruth Wallace, graduate of Kingston General Hospital School of Nursing class of 1931.
Dates
1905
1930
circa 1905-1930
Material
metal:
enamel: off-white; blue
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0007
0007-N1-4
Temporary Location
On display "Doctor's Treatment Room c1930" at Museum of Health Care 20 Feb 2016.
Length
36.0 cm
Width
29.0 cm
Depth
7.0 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Dimension Notes
Length: 36.0 cm. x Width: 29.0 cm. x Depth: 7.0 cm.
Condition Remarks
Shows negligible wear; slightly scratched at bottom front
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Person
Website
Article
Reference Comments
American Association for the History of Nursing, https://www.aahn.org/bedpans#:~:text=Porcelain%2C%20china%2C%20and%20even%20pottery,enamel%20and%20then%20stainless%20steel.&text=Today%20these%20antique%20bedpans%20are,be%20found%20in%20antique%20stores.
Cassandra Good, “The Strange Saga of George Washington’s Bedpan,” August 20th, 2015. Smithsonian Magazine. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/strange-saga-george-washingtons-bedpan-180956347/
Barb (Earl) Gilbert, graduate of Kingston General Hospital School of Nursing class of 1963 and daughter of Ruth Wallace
Research Facts
Before the late nineteenth century, bedpans and similar objects were made of metals such as pewter, brass, and sometimes even glass. By the late nineteenth century, porcelain, china, and pottery were used. As the 20th century dawned, bedpans, urinals, basins, etc. were made of enamel and later stainless steel. In the 1960s, there was a shift towards plastics and other disposables.
The bedpan was designed for people who could not or should not rise from their beds to relieve themselves. A bedpan could be lightly heated and placed under the covers of the beds of the elderly, people who were ill, and women recovering from childbirth so that they would not have to get out of bed. They were routinely emptied by caregivers, nurses, etc.
Images
Less detail
Dates
1920
1940
circa 1920-1940
Collection
Kingston General Hospital School of Nursing Alumnae Collection
Category
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Surgery, Instrumentation
Wound dressing
Equipment and Supplies
Classification
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Surgery, instrumentation
Wound dressing
Equipment and Supplies
Accession Number
995002037
Description
White enamelled kidney-shaped metal basin with blue trim along the outer edge; inner bottom has three small chips to the enamel; base has three large chips in the enamel.
  1 image  
Accession Number
995002037
Collection
Kingston General Hospital School of Nursing Alumnae Collection
Category
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Surgery, Instrumentation
Wound dressing
Equipment and Supplies
Classification
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Surgery, instrumentation
Wound dressing
Equipment and Supplies
MeSH Heading
Equipment and Supplies, Hospital
MM= Physician and Hospital Supply -- enamelware
Description
White enamelled kidney-shaped metal basin with blue trim along the outer edge; inner bottom has three small chips to the enamel; base has three large chips in the enamel.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Ruth Wallace Kingston General Hospital School of Nursing Class of 1931.
Dates
1920
1940
circa 1920-1940
Material
metal: dark grey
enamel: off-white; blue
Inscriptions
Stamped onto the enamel in black: "Czecko-Slovakia"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D3-6
Dimension Notes
Length: 23.0 cm. x Width: 12.2 cm. x Depth: 4.2 cm.
Condition Remarks
Basin has three large chips in the enamel on the base, one of which shows slight rusting; the inner bottom of the basin has three small chips which show slight rusting; there are also three chips along the outer edge
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Person
Reference Comments
Barb (Earl) Gilbert, Kingston General Hospital School of Nursing Class of 1963 and daughter of Ruth Wallace
Research Facts
A kidney dish (British English) or emesis basin (American English) is a shallow basin with a kidney-shaped base and sloping walls used in medical and surgical wards to receive soiled dressings and other medical waste. Reusable kidney dishes are usually made of stainless steel, while disposable ones may be made of paper pulp or plastic. The concave inner rim shape of the dish helps allows it to be held against the patient's body to catch any falling fluids or debris. Various sizes of emesis basin are a common sight in healthcare settings.
Contrary to its name, emesis basins (or "vomit dish") are not usually used for vomiting, as the depth, size, and sloping walls all contribute to spilling or splashing the vomit rather than catching it.
Emesis basins are suited for more controlled situations. When washing out a small wound, for example, sometimes the wash water is applied from above with an emesis basin held underneath to catch the runoff.
Images
Less detail
Dates
1920
1930
circa 1920-1930
Collection
Kingston General Hospital School of Nursing Alumnae Collection
Category
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Surgery, Instrumentation
Wound dressing
Equipment and Supplies
Classification
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Surgery, instrumentation
Wound dressing
Equipment and Supplies
Accession Number
995002044
Description
White enamelled kidney-shaped metal basin with black trim along the outer edge; the outer edges have two small paint smears; inner edges have two small chips.
  1 image  
Accession Number
995002044
Author
KGH Nursing Alumnae
Collection
Kingston General Hospital School of Nursing Alumnae Collection
Category
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Surgery, Instrumentation
Wound dressing
Equipment and Supplies
Classification
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Surgery, instrumentation
Wound dressing
Equipment and Supplies
MeSH Heading
Equipment and Supplies, Hospital
MM= Physician and Hospital Supply -- enamelware
Description
White enamelled kidney-shaped metal basin with black trim along the outer edge; the outer edges have two small paint smears; inner edges have two small chips.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Margaret Kirkpatrick Kingston General Hospital School of Nursing Class of 1935.
Dates
1920
1930
circa 1920-1930
Material
metal: dark grey
enamel: white; black
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D3-6
Dimension Notes
Length: 24.0 cm. x Width: 10.6 cm.
Condition Remarks
Outer edge of basin has two small beige paint smears; inner edge of basin has two small chips; no rusting
Copy Type
Original
Research Facts
A kidney dish (British English) or emesis basin (American English) is a shallow basin with a kidney-shaped base and sloping walls used in medical and surgical wards to receive soiled dressings and other medical waste. Reusable kidney dishes are usually made of stainless steel, while disposable ones may be made of paper pulp or plastic. The concave inner rim shape of the dish helps allows it to be held against the patient's body to catch any falling fluids or debris. Various sizes of emesis basin are a common sight in healthcare settings.
Contrary to its name, emesis basins (or "vomit dish") are not usually used for vomiting, as the depth, size, and sloping walls all contribute to spilling or splashing the vomit rather than catching it.
Emesis basins are suited for more controlled situations. When washing out a small wound, for example, sometimes the wash water is applied from above with an emesis basin held underneath to catch the runoff.
Images
Less detail
Dates
1900
1930
circa 1900-1930
Collection
Kingston General Hospital School of Nursing Alumnae Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Hygiene
Classification
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Bedpan
Home Health Care
Accession Number
995002107 a-b
Description
Slipper-shaped, hollow enamel bedpan (a), rounded at front and tapering at the back with a closed, squared end; open cylindrical spout at front; round opening on top that is covered with (b) a lid, which is round with a knob on top; lip on inside of lid.
  2 images  
Accession Number
995002107 a-b
Collection
Kingston General Hospital School of Nursing Alumnae Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Hygiene
Classification
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Bedpan
Home Health Care
MeSH Heading
Toilet Facilities
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Bedpan
Description
Slipper-shaped, hollow enamel bedpan (a), rounded at front and tapering at the back with a closed, squared end; open cylindrical spout at front; round opening on top that is covered with (b) a lid, which is round with a knob on top; lip on inside of lid.
Number Of Parts
2
Part Names
a - bedpan - Size: Length 47.5 cm x Width 30.5 cm x Depth 10.6 cm
b - lid - Size: Depth 4.8 cm x Diam. 20.8 cm
Provenance
Owned by Noreen Leishman, graduate of the Kingston General Hospital School of Nursing, class of 1950, belonged to "Pokey," a relative; apparently also a relative of Marg Polk.
Site Made (Country)
Austria
Dates
1900
1930
circa 1900-1930
Material
metal: dark grey, brown
enamel: dark grey, light grey
Inscriptions
Stamped in bottom: "AUSTRIA"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0007
0007-N1-1
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Enamel chipped at edges and metal shows some inactive corrosion.
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Book
Website
Article
Reference Comments
American Association for the History of Nursing, https://www.aahn.org/bedpans#:~:text=Porcelain%2C%20china%2C%20and%20even%20pottery,enamel%20and%20then%20stainless%20steel.&text=Today%20these%20antique%20bedpans%20are,be%20found%20in%20antique%20stores.
Cassandra Good, “The Strange Saga of George Washington’s Bedpan,” August 20th, 2015. Smithsonian Magazine. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/strange-saga-george-washingtons-bedpan-180956347/
"Hospital & Physicians Equipment and Supplies," by J.F. Hartz Co., 1960, p. 269
Research Facts
Before the late nineteenth century, bedpans and similar objects were made of metals such as pewter, brass, and sometimes even glass. By the late nineteenth century, porcelain, china, and pottery were used. As the 20th century dawned, bedpans, urinals, basins, etc. were made of enamel and later stainless steel. In the 1960s, there was a shift towards plastics and other disposables.
The bedpan was designed for people who could not or should not rise from their beds to relieve themselves of human waste. A bedpan could be lightly heated and placed under the covers of the beds of the elderly, people who were ill, and women recovering from childbirth so that they would not have to get out of bed. They were routinely emptied by caregivers, nurses, etc.
This bedpan style is a "slipper" type, later referred to as a fracture bedpan and can be slipped under the patient. The spout is to facilitate washing it out. Fracture bedpans are smaller than standard size bedpans, and have one flat end. This bedpan style is designed specifically for patients who are bedridden and have limited movement to use a standard style bedpan.
Images
Less detail
Dates
1900
1930
circa 1900-1930
Collection
Kingston General Hospital School of Nursing Alumnae Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Hygiene
Classification
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Bedpan
Home Health Care
Accession Number
995002108 a-b
Description
Slipper-shaped, hollow enamel bedpan (a), rounded at front and tapering at the back with a closed, squared end; open cylindrical spout at front; round opening on top that is covered with (b) a lid, which is round with a knob on top; lip on inside of lid.
  4 images  
Accession Number
995002108 a-b
Collection
Kingston General Hospital School of Nursing Alumnae Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Hygiene
Classification
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Bedpan
Home Health Care
MeSH Heading
Toilet Facilities
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Description
Slipper-shaped, hollow enamel bedpan (a), rounded at front and tapering at the back with a closed, squared end; open cylindrical spout at front; round opening on top that is covered with (b) a lid, which is round with a knob on top; lip on inside of lid.
Number Of Parts
2
Part Names
a - bedpan - Size: Length 48.5 cm x Width 32.5 cm x Depth 12.5 cm
b - lid - Size: Depth 3.8 cm x Diameter 20.0 cm
Provenance
Donated by Betty Black; owned by friend's aunt.
Dates
1900
1930
circa 1900-1930
Material
metal: silver; brown
enamel: dark blue; grey; black; white
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0007
0007-N1-2
Condition Remarks
Enamel chipped at edges and metal shows some inactive corrosion.
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Website
Article
Book
Reference Comments
American Association for the History of Nursing, https://www.aahn.org/bedpans#:~:text=Porcelain%2C%20china%2C%20and%20even%20pottery,enamel%20and%20then%20stainless%20steel.&text=Today%20these%20antique%20bedpans%20are,be%20found%20in%20antique%20stores.
Cassandra Good, “The Strange Saga of George Washington’s Bedpan,” August 20th, 2015. Smithsonian Magazine. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/strange-saga-george-washingtons-bedpan-180956347/
"Hospital & Physicians Equipment and Supplies," by J.F. Hartz Co., 1960, p. 269
Research Facts
Before the late nineteenth century, bedpans and similar objects were made of metals such as pewter, brass, and sometimes even glass. By the late nineteenth century, porcelain, china, and pottery were used. As the 20th century dawned, bedpans, urinals, basins, etc. were made of enamel and later stainless steel. In the 1960s, there was a shift towards plastics and other disposables.
The bedpan was designed for people who could not or should not rise from their beds to relieve themselves. A bedpan could be lightly heated and placed under the covers of the beds of the elderly, people who were ill, and women recovering from childbirth so that they would not have to get out of bed. They were routinely emptied by caregivers, nurses, etc.
This bedpan style is a "slipper" type, later referred to as a fracture bedpan and can be slipped under the patient. The spout is to facilitate washing it out. Fracture bedpans are smaller than standard size bedpans, and have one flat end. This bedpan style is designed specifically for patients who are bedridden and have limited movement to use a standard style bedpan.
Images
Less detail

autoclave instrument sterilizer

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact1785
Dates
1930
1940
circa 1930-1940
Collection
Kingston General Hospital Angada Collection
Category
Hygiene
Classification
Hygiene
Accession Number
995003007 a-c
Description
Autoclave with two trays and black electrical cord; (a) lidded rectangular metal machine with a handle at the right which opens the lid and a knob (of black plastic) and spigot to release excess steam; machine sits on four short metal legs; (b) large metal instrument tray, rectangular in shape with…
  2 images  
Accession Number
995003007 a-c
Collection
Kingston General Hospital Angada Collection
Category
Hygiene
Classification
Hygiene
MeSH Heading
Sterilization
Description
Autoclave with two trays and black electrical cord; (a) lidded rectangular metal machine with a handle at the right which opens the lid and a knob (of black plastic) and spigot to release excess steam; machine sits on four short metal legs; (b) large metal instrument tray, rectangular in shape with two handles at the sides and a series of holes in the bottom to make moving it through water more easy; (c) small metal instrument tray, rectangular in shape with a long curved handle at the back and a series of holes in the bottom to make moving it through the water more easy
Number Of Parts
3
Part Names
a - autoclave - Size: Length 38.0 cm. x Width 14.0 cm. x Depth 16.0 cm.
b - autoclave tray - Size: Length 31.0 cm. x Width 12.0 cm. x Depth 6.0 cm.
c - autoclave tray - Size: Length 10.5 cm. x Width 5.5 cm. x Depth 6.0 cm.
Maker
Castle
Site Made (Country)
United States of America
Dates
1930
1940
circa 1930-1940
Material
metal: silver
plastic: black
rubber: black
Inscriptions
Engraved on the bottom: "C413 R3789 Pat. July 25, '16 Pat. July 1 '19 110 Volt Amp Made in U.S.A. Caution for use only on wall or base receptacle"; Castle logo on front
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0007
0007-M2-4
Condition Remarks
Autoclave was very dirty and dusty; some corrosion is visible on the metal at the hinges and bottom; the trays both have some green corrosion visible; these objects should be monitored periodically to ensure that there is no active corrosion
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Person
Reference Comments
Sylvia Burkinshaw
Research Facts
Possibly used by Dr. Maybee, General Practioner in Gananoque, Ontario.
Exhibit History
On exhibit: Listerism: Antisepsis and the Roots of Modern Surgery," Royal College of Physicians & Surgeons of Canada; Ottawa, 30 May 2013.
Images
Less detail

autoclave instrument sterilizer

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact1792
Dates
1950
circa 1950
Collection
Angada Collection
Category
Hygiene
Classification
Hygiene
Accession Number
995003014 a-c
Description
Metal oil sterilizer consisting of (a) autoclave-oil sterilizer which is rectangular in shape with four plastic feet on the bottom corners and a black electric cord coming from the back right; (b) lid which fits on top of (a) with a black plastic handle in the centre top and two curved pieces of me…
  2 images  
Accession Number
995003014 a-c
Collection
Angada Collection
Category
Hygiene
Classification
Hygiene
MeSH Heading
Sterilization
Description
Metal oil sterilizer consisting of (a) autoclave-oil sterilizer which is rectangular in shape with four plastic feet on the bottom corners and a black electric cord coming from the back right; (b) lid which fits on top of (a) with a black plastic handle in the centre top and two curved pieces of metal on inside centre; (c) perforated metal tray which fits inside of (a) with two black plastic and metal handles at the sides.
Number Of Parts
3
Part Names
a - autoclave - Size: Length 22.0 cm. x Width 10.0 cm. x Depth 11.5 cm.
b - autoclave lid - Size: Length 22.0 cm. x Width 10.0 cm. x Depth 2.0 cm.
c - autoclave tray - Size: Length 20.0 cm. x Width 8.0 cm. x Depth 2.0 cm.
Maker
Pelton & Crane Co.
Site Made (City)
Detroit
Site Made (State)
Michigan
Site Made (Country)
United States of America
Dates
1950
circa 1950
Date Remarks
Made and used in the 1950's
Material
plastic: black
metal: silver
rubber: black
Inscriptions
"Pelton Oil Sterilizer" on front; "Pelton Sterilizer Serial 108 11 338 Model 108 Volts 110-120 Watts 330 The Pelton & Crane Company Detroit, Michigan U.S.A. -- Caution -- Use on A.C. current only" on bottom; "5A-250V-10A 125V Gaynor Und. Lab. Insp made in U.S.A. No. 5203" on on / off switch
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0007
0007-M2-4
Condition Remarks
Autoclave was very dirty and dusty; the rubber of the electric cord has broken down and is deteriorating with bits falling off; the tray is missing a screw from one of its handles; except for the electric cord, the autoclave is in good condition overall; #3: the rubber cord is hard and crumbling.
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Person
Reference Comments
Sylvia Burkinshaw
Research Facts
Used to sterilize eye instruments by Dr. McBroom
Images
Less detail

denture cleaning case

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact1798
Collection
Angada Collection
Category
Dental
Dentures
Hygiene
Home Health Care
Classification
Dental
Dental, Supplies
Dentures
Hygiene
Home Health Care
Accession Number
995003020
Description
Plastic oval-shaped lidded cup for cleaning and then storing dentures; the lid is attached to the back of the cup by hinges; the sides of the cup have vertical lines
  2 images  
Accession Number
995003020
Collection
Angada Collection
Category
Dental
Dentures
Hygiene
Home Health Care
Classification
Dental
Dental, Supplies
Dentures
Hygiene
Home Health Care
MeSH Heading
Denture, Complete -- instrumentation
Description
Plastic oval-shaped lidded cup for cleaning and then storing dentures; the lid is attached to the back of the cup by hinges; the sides of the cup have vertical lines
Number Of Parts
1
Site Made (Country)
United States of America
Material
plastic: green
Inscriptions
"MADE IN USA [superscript '3']" in raised letters on the bottom
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-E5-2
Dimension Notes
Length: 10.0 cm. x Width: 8.3 cm. x Depth: 5.7 cm.
Condition Remarks
Denture box was slightly dusty and dirty; had been stored in a plastic bag; appears to never have been used
Copy Type
Original
Images
Less detail
Dates
1920
1930
circa 1920-1930
Collection
Dr. Burns Collection
Category
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Surgery, Instrumentation
Wound dressing
Equipment and Supplies
Classification
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Surgery, instrumentation
Wound dressing
Equipment and Supplies
Accession Number
995005016
Description
An emesis basin in the shape of a kidney bean.
  2 images  
Accession Number
995005016
Collection
Dr. Burns Collection
Category
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Surgery, Instrumentation
Wound dressing
Equipment and Supplies
Classification
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Surgery, instrumentation
Wound dressing
Equipment and Supplies
MeSH Heading
Equipment and Supplies, Hospital
MM= Physician and Hospital Supply -- enamelware
Description
An emesis basin in the shape of a kidney bean.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Owned and used by Dr. Burns of Napanee, Ont., a 1947 graduate of the Queen's University Medical Program; some items belonged to Dr. Stratton, who held the Napanee practice prior to Dr. Burns.
Dates
1920
1930
circa 1920-1930
Material
enamelware: white; blue
Inscriptions
None
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D3-6
Temporary Location
On display "Doctor's Treatment Room c1930" at Museum of Health Care 20 Feb 2016.
Dimension Notes
Length 22.9 cm x Width 10.8 cm x Depth 3.5 cm
Condition Remarks
The basin has suffered some cracks and staining on interior, and on the base patches of enamel appear to have been melted at some point; a few points of active corrosion can be seen, especially under the rim.
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Book
Reference Comments
"Hospital & Physicians Equipment and Supplies," by J. F. Hartz Co., 1960, p. 269 (similar to item #7H-380)
Research Facts
A kidney dish (British English) or emesis basin (American English) is a shallow basin with a kidney-shaped base and sloping walls used in medical and surgical wards to receive soiled dressings and other medical waste. Reusable kidney dishes are usually made of stainless steel, while disposable ones may be made of paper pulp or plastic. The concave inner rim shape of the dish helps allows it to be held against the patient's body to catch any falling fluids or debris. Various sizes of emesis basin are a common sight in healthcare settings.
Contrary to its name, emesis basins (or "vomit dish") are not usually used for vomiting, as the depth, size, and sloping walls all contribute to spilling or splashing the vomit rather than catching it.
Emesis basins are suited for more controlled situations. When washing out a small wound, for example, sometimes the wash water is applied from above with an emesis basin held underneath to catch the runoff.
Images
Less detail

203 records – page 1 of 21.