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Liebreich's eyedrop

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact5693
Dates
1900
1918
circa 1900-1918
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Diagnostic & Treatment Artifacts
Classification
Ophthalmology
Accession Number
1968.2.1 a-c
Description
A small glass bottle (a) in the shape of a Florence flask; one-holed cork with glass tubing in place; fits in a cylindrical cardboard box (b, c) with a label on top.
  1 image  
Accession Number
1968.2.1 a-c
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Diagnostic & Treatment Artifacts
Classification
Ophthalmology
MeSH Heading
Ophthalmic Solutions
Administration, Topical -- instrumentation
Description
A small glass bottle (a) in the shape of a Florence flask; one-holed cork with glass tubing in place; fits in a cylindrical cardboard box (b, c) with a label on top.
Number Of Parts
3
Part Names
a - bottle - Length 7.5 cm x Diam. 3.2 cm
b - container bottom - Length 6.2 cm x Diam.4.5 cm
c - container top - Length 4.0 cm x Diam.4.5 cm
Provenance
Acquired from the Academy of Medicine; donated by Dr. A. A. Track.
Maker
S. Maw Son and Sons
Site Made (City)
London
Site Made (Country)
England
Dates
1900
1918
circa 1900-1918
Date Remarks
Seee reference
Material
glass: clear
cork: brown
cardboard: black; white
Inscriptions
On label: "EYE DROP // BOTTLE" around the outer circle; inside that, "S. MAW SON & SONS" // TRADE MARK"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-E4-8
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Internet
Reference Comments
https://collection.sciencemuseum.org.uk/people/cp110869/s-maw-son-sons-limited
Research Facts
1901/3-1918 - on retirement of John Thompson, S. Maw Son & Thompson renamed S Maw, Son & Sons, 7-12 Aldersgate, London
German ophthalmologist Richard Liebreich (30 June 1830 – 19 January 1917). In 1853 he earned his doctorate at Halle, and from 1854 until 1862 was an assistant to Albrecht von Graefe (1828-1870) in Berlin. He subsequently practiced medicine in Paris (from 1862) and London (from 1870), where he was head of ophthalmology at St. Thomas Hospital. He later retired from medicine and moved back to Paris, where he worked as a sculptor and painter.
In 1863 he published the highly acclaimed Atlas des Ophthalmoscopie, an atlas dedicated to the subject of ophthalmoscopy. He also designed a popular model of ophthalmoscope called the "Liebreich ophthalmoscope".[2] He was interested in the pathological changes of the eye as viewed through the ophthalmoscope, and in 1859 provided a classic description of ocular changes in Bright's disease.
Images
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