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veterinary fleam

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact15118
Dates
1830
1899
circa 1830-1899
Category
Diagnostic & Treatment Artifacts
Classification
Treatment, General
Phlebotomy
Accession Number
017020012
Description
Veterinary bloodletting fleam with three differently sized metal blades which fold into a metal sheath of the same shape. Each blade is long and rectangular with a triangular blade sticking out three quarters of the way up with rounded sides. Each blade turns on a screw attached to the end of the s…
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Accession Number
017020012
Category
Diagnostic & Treatment Artifacts
Classification
Treatment, General
Phlebotomy
MeSH Heading
Bloodletting -- instrumentation
Phlebotomy
Veterinary Medicine
Description
Veterinary bloodletting fleam with three differently sized metal blades which fold into a metal sheath of the same shape. Each blade is long and rectangular with a triangular blade sticking out three quarters of the way up with rounded sides. Each blade turns on a screw attached to the end of the sheath, and can turn almost 360 degrees.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Belonged to the donor, Dr. Jacalyn Duffin, MD, PhD, a hematologist and historian who held the Hannah Chair of the History of Medicine at Queen's University from 1988 to 2017.
Site Made (City)
Sheffield
Site Made (State)
South Yorkshire
Site Made (Country)
England
Dates
1830
1899
circa 1830-1899
Date Remarks
Based on material, presence of maker's mark.
Material
brass
metal
grey
steel
Inscriptions
"CAST STEEL // SHEFFIELD"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D6-5
Length
14.5 cm
Width
2.7 cm
Height
0.7 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Dimension Notes
Dimensions measured at widest points.
Condition Remarks
Much rusting and fingerprinting, especially along blades.
Reference Types
Website
Reference Comments
http://www.medicalantiques.com/medical/Scarifications_and_Bleeder_Medical_Antiques.htm; http://www.alllancets.com/Braspg2.html
Research Facts
The fleams used for veterinary purposes were placed over the jugular vein of the neck most commonly and inserted with the help of a fleam stick. This was a heavy wooden club used to drive the blade in with a quick motion (so the horse didn’t know what hit him). Fleams were also used on humans to let blood.
Images
Less detail