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4101 records – page 1 of 411.

Dates
1800
circa 1800
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Diagnostic & Treatment Artifacts
Classification
Treatment, General
Accession Number
002050001 a-f
Description
Enema syringe consists of a pewter cylindrical (a) barrel; screw-on (b) nozzle extends from top of syringe and a wooden (c) plunger extends from the bottom; plunger head has detached from handle and is stuck inside barrel; plunger handle ends in (d) washer and a thin long (e) nut which is clogged w…
  2 images  
Accession Number
002050001 a-f
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Diagnostic & Treatment Artifacts
Classification
Treatment, General
MeSH Heading
Enema -- instrumentation
Syringes
MM= Irrigation -- syringe -- rectal
Description
Enema syringe consists of a pewter cylindrical (a) barrel; screw-on (b) nozzle extends from top of syringe and a wooden (c) plunger extends from the bottom; plunger head has detached from handle and is stuck inside barrel; plunger handle ends in (d) washer and a thin long (e) nut which is clogged with calcified residue; bottom of barrel has a screw-on (f) cap.
Number Of Parts
6
Part Names
a - barrel - Size: Length 19.5 cm x Diam 5.0 cm
b - nozzle tip - Size: Length 15.0 cm x Diam 2.7 cm
c - plunger - Size: Length 28.5 cm x Diam 4.0 cm
d - washer - Size: Depth 0.3 cm x Diam 4.0 cm
e - nut - Size: Length 4.0 cm x Diam 2.0 cm
f - cap - Size: Length 6.0 cm x Width 5.3 cm x Depth 1.7 cm
Provenance
Originally belonged with Dr. Drake's collection of medical artefacts and ceramics; later bequested to Academy of Medicine.
Site Made (Country)
England
Dates
1800
circa 1800
Date Remarks
Date taken from donor file and book on Dr. Drake's collection
Material
metal: silver;
wood: brown;
rubber: brown;
residue: white
Inscriptions
Stamped in metal on bottom cap: "No.4"; handwritten in pen on barrel and plunger: "DD123".
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-E6-15
Condition Remarks
Barrel has some dents and scratches; plunger shaft is scuffed with faded lacquer; washer, nut and insides of barrel are covered in a white calcified substance; build up of calcified residue inside nut; rubber disk around nozzle is stiff and bristle.
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Book
JPG
Reference Comments
"Antique Medical Instruments", Ellisabeth Bennion, 1979, pp. 169-173.; "Nurturing Yesterday's Child: A Portrait of the Drake Collection of Paediatric History", Mary Spaulding and Penny Welch, 1994, pp. 1-3, 222-225; "The Evolution of Surgical Instruments: An Illustrated History from Ancient Times to the Twentieth Century", John Kirkup MD, FRCS, 2005, pp. 228-230; CD #1.
Research Facts
Enema syringes, also known as clysters, were popular around the 1800s, and reflected the then current belief in the benefits of purging the body on a regular basis. Doctors, apothecaries and individuals themselves could administer enema solutions via clyster syringes for the purposes of colonic irrigation. These clysters could have different nozzle attachments and hoses for an easier reach for the self-administering user. Clysters evolved to be smaller and sometimes more discrete as in the case of travelling clysters which were shaped to look like a book. This item was a part of a large collection of items belonging to Dr. Drake, a paediatrician and nutritionist who co-developed the Pablum cereal.
Images
Less detail
Dates
1800
circa 1800
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Diagnostic & Treatment Artifacts
Classification
Treatment, General
Accession Number
002050002 a-e
Description
Enema syringe consists of a large cylindrical pewter (a) barrel with ribbed shaft; top of barrel holds an angled (b) nozzle tip; from the bottom of barrel extends a handle for wooden (c) plunger; metal (d) plunger head with fabric wrapped around the middle has detached from plunger handle; metal (e…
  2 images  
Accession Number
002050002 a-e
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Diagnostic & Treatment Artifacts
Classification
Treatment, General
MeSH Heading
Enema -- instrumentation
Syringes
MM= Irrigation -- syringe -- rectal
Description
Enema syringe consists of a large cylindrical pewter (a) barrel with ribbed shaft; top of barrel holds an angled (b) nozzle tip; from the bottom of barrel extends a handle for wooden (c) plunger; metal (d) plunger head with fabric wrapped around the middle has detached from plunger handle; metal (e) cap screws onto bottom of barrel.
Number Of Parts
5
Part Names
a - barrel - Size: Length 37.5 cm x Diam 9.5 cm
b - nozzle tip - Size: Length 13.0 cm x Diam 3.0 cm
c - plunger - Size: Length 45.7 cm x Diam 4.7 cm
d - plunger head - Size: Length 7.4 cm x Diam 4.0 cm
e - cap - Size: Length 5.3 cm x Diam 9.5 cm
Provenance
Originally belonged with Dr. Drake's collection of medical artefacts and ceramics; later bequested to Academy of Medicine
Site Made (Country)
England
Dates
1800
circa 1800
Date Remarks
Date taken from donor file and book on Dr. Drake's collection.
Material
metal: silver
wood: brown
fabric: brown
rubber: brown
Inscriptions
Handwritten in pen on barrel and plunger: "DD124"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-E6-15
Condition Remarks
Barrel has some chips, dents and scratches; rubber disk around nozzle is disintegrating; plunger head is wrapped in bristly fabric which is caked with dust; plunger head has detached from plunger handle.
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Book
JPG
Reference Comments
"Antique Medical Instruments", Ellisabeth Bennion, 1979, pp. 169-173.; "Nurturing Yesterday's Child: A Portrait of the Drake Collection of Paediatric History", Mary Spaulding and Penny Welch, 1994, pp. 1-3, 222-225; "The Evolution of Surgical Instruments: An Illustrated History from Ancient Times to the Twentieth Century", John Kirkup MD, FRCS, 2005, pp. 228-230; CD #1.
Research Facts
Large enema syringes, also known as clysters, were popular around the 1800s, and reflected the then current belief in the benefits of purging the body on a regular basis. Doctors, apothecaries and individuals themselves could administer enema solutions via clyster syringes for the purposes of colonic irrigation. These clysters could have different nozzle attachments and hoses for an easier reach for the self-administering user. Clysters evolved to be smaller and sometimes more discrete as in the case of travelling clysters which were shaped to look like a book. This item was a part of a large collection of items belonging to Dr. Drake, a paediatrician and nutritionist who co-developed the Pablum cereal. Picture of this particular enema syringe features in a book on Dr. Drake's collection.
Images
Less detail
Dates
1800
circa 1800
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Diagnostic & Treatment Artifacts
Classification
Treatment, General
Accession Number
002050003 a-c
Description
Enema syringe consists of a large cylindrical pewter (a) barrel; an angled (b) nozzle tip screws onto top of barrel; bottom of barrel has a metal (c) plunger handle ending in a cloth-wrapped plunger head; plunger handle passes through the centre of a metal cap which screws to the bottom of the barr…
  2 images  
Accession Number
002050003 a-c
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Diagnostic & Treatment Artifacts
Classification
Treatment, General
MeSH Heading
Enema -- instrumentation
Syringes
MM= Irrigation -- syringe -- rectal
Description
Enema syringe consists of a large cylindrical pewter (a) barrel; an angled (b) nozzle tip screws onto top of barrel; bottom of barrel has a metal (c) plunger handle ending in a cloth-wrapped plunger head; plunger handle passes through the centre of a metal cap which screws to the bottom of the barrel to keep the plunger from falling out.
Number Of Parts
3
Part Names
a - barrel - Size: Length 29.0 cm x Diam 10.0 cm
b - nozzle tip - Size: Length 14.4 cm x Width 4.5 cm x Depth 3.6 cm
c - plunger - Size: Length 37.0 cm x Diam 10.5 cm
Provenance
Originally belonged with Dr. Drake's collection of medical artefacts and ceramics; later bequested to Academy of Medicine
Site Made (Country)
England
Dates
1800
circa 1800
Date Remarks
Date taken from donor file and book on Dr. Drake's collection
Material
metal: silver
fabric: yellow, red, green
rubber: brown
Inscriptions
Handwritten in pen on barrel and plunger: "DD125"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-E6-15
Condition Remarks
Barrel has scratches and dents; plunger handle bears a significant dent; plunger head is wrapped in fabric with is stained, dusty and fragile
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Book
JPG
Reference Comments
"Antique Medical Instruments", Ellisabeth Bennion, 1979, pp. 169-173.; "Nurturing Yesterday's Child: A Portrait of the Drake Collection of Paediatric History", Mary Spaulding and Penny Welch, 1994, pp. 1-3, 222-225.; "The Evolution of Surgical Instruments: An Illustrated History from Ancient Times to the Twentieth Century", John Kirkup MD, FRCS, 2005, pp. 228-230; CD #1.
Research Facts
Large enema syringes, also known as clysters, were popular around the 1800s, and reflected the then current belief in the benefits of purging the body on a regular basis. Doctors, apothecaries and individuals themselves could administer enema solutions via clyster syringes for the purposes of colonic irrigation. These clysters could have different nozzle attachments and hoses for an easier reach for the self-administering user. Clysters evolved to be smaller and sometimes more discrete as in the case of travelling clysters which were shaped to look like a book. This item was a part of a large collection of items belonging to Dr. Drake, a paediatrician and nutritionist who co-developed the Pablum cereal.
Images
Less detail
Dates
1800
circa 1800
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Diagnostic & Treatment Artifacts
Classification
Treatment, General
Accession Number
002050004 a-d
Description
Enema syringe consists of a large pewter (a) barrel with a long curved (b) nozzle tip on one end and a wooden (c) plunger on the other end; plunger passes through the centre of (d) cap which screws onto the bottom of barrel.
  2 images  
Accession Number
002050004 a-d
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Diagnostic & Treatment Artifacts
Classification
Treatment, General
MeSH Heading
Enema -- instrumentation
Syringes
MM= Irrigation -- syringe -- rectal
Description
Enema syringe consists of a large pewter (a) barrel with a long curved (b) nozzle tip on one end and a wooden (c) plunger on the other end; plunger passes through the centre of (d) cap which screws onto the bottom of barrel.
Number Of Parts
4
Part Names
a - barrel - Size: Length 24.5 cm x Diam 7.5 cm
b - nozzle tip - Size: Length 14.0 cm x Width 9.0 cm x Depth 3.6 cm
c - plunger - Size: Length 33.7 cm x Diam 4.0 cm
d - cap - Size: Length 4.7 cm x Diam 7.5 cm
Provenance
Originally belonged with Dr. Drake's collection of medical artefacts and ceramics; later bequested to Academy of Medicine
Site Made (Country)
England
Dates
1800
circa 1800
Date Remarks
Date obtained from donor file and book on Dr. Drake's collection
Material
metal: silver
wood: brown
fibre: yellow
Inscriptions
Handwritten in pen on barrel, nozzle and wooden plunger: "DD 126"; Stamped into metal on barrel: "RA // M // P"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-E6-15
Condition Remarks
Metal is dented and chipped in a few areas; nozzle part is wrapped in metal wire at the point where it is bending; wooden plunger handle has cracked and part of it broken off; plunger shaft has several cracks running down length-wise; plunger head has detached from plunger shaft and is stuck inside the barrel; metal slightly tarnished.
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Book
JPG
Reference Comments
"Antique Medical Instruments", Ellisabeth Bennion, 1979, pp. 169-173.; "Nurturing Yesterday's Child: A Portrait of the Drake Collection of Paediatric History", Mary Spaulding and Penny Welch, 1994, pp. 1-3, 222-225.; "The Evolution of Surgical Instruments: An Illustrated History from Ancient Times to the Twentieth Century", John Kirkup MD, FRCS, 2005, pp. 228-230; CD #1.
Research Facts
Large enema syringes, also known as clysters, were popular around the 1800s, and reflected the then current belief in the benefits of purging the body on a regular basis. Doctors, apothecaries and individuals themselves could administer enema solutions via clyster syringes for the purposes of colonic irrigation. These clysters could have different nozzle attachments and hoses for an easier reach for the self-administering user. Clysters evolved to be smaller and sometimes more discrete as in the case of travelling clysters which were shaped to look like a book. This item was a part of a large collection of items belonging to Dr. Drake, a paediatrician and nutritionist who co-developed the Pablum cereal.
Images
Less detail

Clyster syringe / enema

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact12068
Dates
1800
circa 1800
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Diagnostic & Treatment Artifacts
Classification
Treatment, General
Accession Number
002050005 a-d
Description
Enema syringe consists of large cylindrical pewter (a) barrel with ribbing; top has a (b) screw-on cap with an opening for a potential nozzle or hose addition; wooden (c) plunger handle extends from bottom; handle is hollow on the inside and has threading with a missing cap; plunger handle passes t…
  2 images  
Accession Number
002050005 a-d
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Diagnostic & Treatment Artifacts
Classification
Treatment, General
MeSH Heading
Enema -- instrumentation
Syringes
MM= Irrigation -- syringe -- rectal
Description
Enema syringe consists of large cylindrical pewter (a) barrel with ribbing; top has a (b) screw-on cap with an opening for a potential nozzle or hose addition; wooden (c) plunger handle extends from bottom; handle is hollow on the inside and has threading with a missing cap; plunger handle passes through centre of metal (d) cap which screws into bottom of barrel.
Number Of Parts
4
Part Names
a - barrel - Size: Length 23.5 cm x Diam 7.5 cm
b - cap for nozzle - Size: Length 3.0 cm x Diam 4.0 cm
c - plunger - Size: Length 29.0 cm x Diam 5.7 cm
d - bottom cap - Size: Length 3.3 cm x Diam 7.5 cm
Provenance
Originally belonged with Dr. Drake's collection of medical artefacts and ceramics; later bequested to Academy of Medicine.
Site Made (Country)
England
Dates
1800
circa 1800
Date Remarks
Date taken from donor file and book on Dr. Drake's collection
Material
metal: silver
wood: brown
rubber: brown
Inscriptions
Handwritten in pen on barrel and plunger: "DD127"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-E6-15
Condition Remarks
Metal tarnished and scratched with minor dents; rubber disk disintegrating around nozzle area; plunger difficult to remove from barrel; plunger handle missing cap; threading exposed and chipped.
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Book
Reference Comments
"Antique Medical Instruments", Ellisabeth Bennion, 1979, pp. 169-173.; "Nurturing Yesterday's Child: A Portrait of the Drake Collection of Paediatric History", Mary Spaulding and Penny Welch, 1994, pp. 1-3, 222-225.; "The Evolution of Surgical Instruments: An Illustrated History from Ancient Times to the Twentieth Century", John Kirkup MD, FRCS, 2005, pp. 228-230
Research Facts
Large enema syringes, also known as clysters, were popular around the 1800s, and reflected the then current belief in the benefits of purging the body on a regular basis. Doctors, apothecaries and individuals themselves could administer enema solutions via clyster syringes for the purposes of colonic irrigation. These clysters could have different nozzle attachments and hoses for an easier reach for the self-administering user.
Clysters evolved to be smaller and sometimes more discrete as in the case of travelling clysters which were shaped to look like a book. This item was a part of a large collection of items belonging to Dr. Drake, a paediatrician and nutritionist who co-developed the Pablum cereal.
Images
Less detail
Dates
1800
circa 1800
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Diagnostic & Treatment Artifacts
Classification
Treatment, General
Accession Number
002050006 a-d
Description
Enema syringe consists of a large cylindrical pewter (a) barrel with ribbed shaft; top of barrel holds an angled (b) nozzle tip; from the bottom of barrel extendes a handle for (c) wooden plunger; plunger passes through centre of metal (d) cap which screws onto bottom of barrel.
  2 images  
Accession Number
002050006 a-d
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Diagnostic & Treatment Artifacts
Classification
Treatment, General
MeSH Heading
Enema -- instrumentation
Syringes
MM= Irrigation -- syringe -- rectal
Description
Enema syringe consists of a large cylindrical pewter (a) barrel with ribbed shaft; top of barrel holds an angled (b) nozzle tip; from the bottom of barrel extendes a handle for (c) wooden plunger; plunger passes through centre of metal (d) cap which screws onto bottom of barrel.
Number Of Parts
4
Part Names
a - barrel - Size: Length 25.0 cm x Diam 7.6 cm
b - nozzle - Size: Length 8.0 cm x Width 5.5 cm x Depth 3.8 cm
c - plunger - Size: Length 33.0 cm x Diam 6.5 cm
d - cap - Size: Length 3.3 cm x Diam 7.5 cm
Provenance
Originally belonged with Dr. Drake's collection of medical artefacts and ceramics; later bequested to Academy of Medicine
Site Made (Country)
England
Dates
1800
circa 1800
Date Remarks
Date taken from donor file and book on Dr. Drake's collection
Material
metal: silver
wood: brown
tape: yellow
Inscriptions
Handwritten in pen on barrel, nozzle and plunger: "DD128"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-E6-15
Condition Remarks
Metal tarnished and dented in some areas; shows signs of previous metal corrosion; wooden handle chipped; plunger stick is hard to remove from barrel; plunger wrapped in tape at midsection; possible previous break or crack.
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Book
JPG
Reference Comments
"Antique Medical Instruments", Ellisabeth Bennion, 1979, pp. 169-173.; "Nurturing Yesterday's Child: A Portrait of the Drake Collection of Paediatric History", Mary Spaulding and Penny Welch, 1994, pp. 1-3, 222-225.; "The Evolution of Surgical Instruments: An Illustrated History from Ancient Times to the Twentieth Century", John Kirkup MD, FRCS, 2005, pp. 228-230; CD #1.
Research Facts
Large enema syringes, also known as clysters, were popular around the 1800s, and reflected the then current belief in the benefits of purging the body on a regular basis. Doctors, apothecaries and individuals themselves could administer enema solutions via clyster syringes for the purposes of colonic irrigation. These clysters could have different nozzle attachments and hoses for an easier reach for the self-administering user. Clysters evolved to be smaller and sometimes more discrete as in the case of travelling clysters which were shaped to look like a book. This item was a part of a large collection of items belonging to Dr. Drake, a paediatrician and nutritionist who co-developed the Pablum cereal.
Images
Less detail

The Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Nicolaes Tulp [print]

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact11066
Dates
1890
1920
circa 1890-1920
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Archival Items
Classification
Archival, Images
Accession Number
002050007
Description
Cololurful print mounted on fabric with a varnish on top, depicts a group of seven surgeons looking on as physician Nicolaes Tulp leads an anatomy lesson on a cadaver; unframed.
  1 image  
Accession Number
002050007
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Archival Items
Classification
Archival, Images
MeSH Heading
Art
Description
Cololurful print mounted on fabric with a varnish on top, depicts a group of seven surgeons looking on as physician Nicolaes Tulp leads an anatomy lesson on a cadaver; unframed.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Acquired from the Academy of Medicine.
Dates
1890
1920
circa 1890-1920
Material
fabric: cream
ink: brown, cream, black
Permanent Location
Storage Room 2005
2005-1-6
Length
73.2 cm
Width
55.2 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Very fragile
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Internet
Reference Comments
Zygmont, Bryon. “Rembrant, The Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Tulp.” Khan Academy. Accessed February 23, 2017. https://www.khanacademy.org/humanities/monarchy-enlightenment/baroque-art1/holland/a/rembrandt-the-anatomy-lesson-of-dr-tulp
Research Facts
The original portrait, painted by Dutch Baroque Rembrandt van Rijn in 1632, depicts a group of seven surgeons looking on as physician Nicolaes Tulp leads an anatomy lesson. It was commissioned to hang in the board room of the Guild of Surgeons, a group that Tulp had become a reader of three years before. Tulp is shown as the only man wearing a hat, showing his elevated position over his pupil, as he demonstrates how arm muscles are attached to the body using forceps. He was known to give theory lessons twice a week in Amsterdam with one public autopsy a year being conducted. The painting shows the 1632 autopsy that used the body of a criminal, an executed thief named Adriaen het Kint as their cadaver. The surgeon in the centre towards the back holds a sheet of paper that lists the names of all the men in participating in the lesson, many of whom would have paid for the honor of being included in the composition.
Though it was one of Rembrandt’s earlier works, The Anatomy Lesson remains one of his most well-known paintings; the skill is evident in the expressive, recognizable faces of the surgeons and the dynamic contrast between light and dark. Rembrandt does, however, some artistic liberties, particularly as the surgeon would have begun with opening the chest cavity in an autopsy as opposed to beginning with an arm.
This was also one of the first painting that Rembrandt signed with his forename as opposed to RHL which he had used on previous ones, likely showing his increasing confidence in his artistic abilities.
The work in our collection is a hand-painted copy made with oil on canvas, likely with a varnish on top (this would have to be confirmed by a conservationist however). We can assume this as the weave of the canvas is evident and the corners have some paint flaking off, but also there are small details of the copy that vary from the original.
Images
Less detail

The Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Nicolaes Tulp [print]

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact11940
Dates
1798
1840
circa 1798-1840
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Archival Items
Classification
Archival, Images
Accession Number
002050008
Description
Monotone reproduction print of a painting affixed to heavy paper; depicts a group of seven surgeons looking on as physician Nicolaes Tulp leads an anatomy lesson on a cadaver; text on front in Dutch and French; appears to be removed from frame; embossed line around perimeter of print with wide plai…
Accession Number
002050008
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Archival Items
Classification
Archival, Images
MeSH Heading
Anatomy -- pictorial works
Description
Monotone reproduction print of a painting affixed to heavy paper; depicts a group of seven surgeons looking on as physician Nicolaes Tulp leads an anatomy lesson on a cadaver; text on front in Dutch and French; appears to be removed from frame; embossed line around perimeter of print with wide plain border; paper still flexible.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Acquired from the Academy of Medicine.
Site Made (City)
Amsterdam
Site Made (Country)
Holland
Dates
1798
1840
circa 1798-1840
Material
paper: cream
ink: black
graphite: grey
Inscriptions
"Rembrandt van Ryn pinoc 1632 // T de Frey f: aquforti 1798 // DEMONSTRATION ANATOMIQUE, // faite par le celebre Medicine Nicolas Tulp. // Profesfeur d'anatomic a Amsterdam, l'An 1683 // le tableau original se trouve au Theatre // anatomique d'Amsterdam."; repeated in Dutch
Permanent Location
Storage Room 2005
2005-1-3 Box D
Length
44.0 cm
Width
36.0 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Heavily foxed and yellowed paper; missing minor piece on bottom edge and 1.5 cm tear at upper left edge
Copy Type
reproduction
Reference Types
Internet
Reference Comments
Zygmont, Bryon. “Rembrant, The Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Tulp.” Khan Academy. Accessed February 23, 2017. https://www.khanacademy.org/humanities/monarchy-enlightenment/baroque-art1/holland/a/rembrandt-the-anatomy-lesson-of-dr-tulp
Research Facts
The original portrait, painted by Dutch Baroque Rembrandt van Rijn in 1632, depicts a group of seven surgeons looking on as physician Nicolaes Tulp leads an anatomy lesson. It was commissioned to hang in the board room of the Guild of Surgeons, a group that Tulp had become a reader of three years before. Tulp is shown as the only man wearing a hat, showing his elevated position over his pupil, as he demonstrates how arm muscles are attached to the body using forceps. He was known to give theory lessons twice a week in Amsterdam with one public autopsy a year being conducted. The painting shows the 1632 autopsy that used the body of a criminal, an executed thief named Adriaen het Kint as their cadaver. The surgeon in the centre towards the back holds a sheet of paper that lists the names of all the men in participating in the lesson, many of whom would have paid for the honor of being included in the composition.
Though it was one of Rembrandt’s earlier works, The Anatomy Lesson remains one of his most well-known paintings; the skill is evident in the expressive, recognizable faces of the surgeons and the dynamic contrast between light and dark. Rembrandt does, however, some artistic liberties, particularly as the surgeon would have begun with opening the chest cavity in an autopsy as opposed to beginning with an arm.
This was also one of the first painting that Rembrandt signed with his forename as opposed to RHL which he had used on previous ones, likely showing his increasing confidence in his artistic abilities.
Prev. # L42 / AMP344
Less detail
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Archival Items
Classification
Archival, Images
Accession Number
002050012
Description
Picture of Ambroise Paré (1517-90).
Accession Number
002050012
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Archival Items
Classification
Archival, Images
MeSH Heading
Patient-Physician Relations
Physicians -- portraits
History of Medicine, 16th Cent. -- pictorial works
Description
Picture of Ambroise Paré (1517-90).
Provenance
Acquired from the Academy of Medicine.
Permanent Location
Storage Room 2005
2005-1-1 Box B
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Other
Reference Comments
Prev. # 75.9.1
Less detail

Sir William Osler Garden Party, Oxford, 1912 [photograph]

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact9032
Dates
1912
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Archival Items
Classification
Archival, Images
Accession Number
002050013
Description
A photograph of a garden party taken in Oxford outside of a house, in the garden; black-and-white print, matte finish, mounted on board.
Accession Number
002050013
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Archival Items
Classification
Archival, Images
MeSH Heading
Physicians -- portraits
Anniversaries and Social Events
MM= Commemorative and Association Items
Description
A photograph of a garden party taken in Oxford outside of a house, in the garden; black-and-white print, matte finish, mounted on board.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Acquired from the Academy of Medicine; source: unknown.
Maker
Gillman & Co. Ltd.
Site Made (City)
Oxford
Site Made (Country)
England
Dates
1912
Date Remarks
Date of garden party.
Material
paper: black; white
Permanent Location
Storage Room 2005
2005-1-1 Box B
Dimension Notes
Length 57.5 cm x Width 48.0 cm
Condition Remarks
Mount very brittle; corners broken off mount; some spotting on print.
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Other
Reference Comments
C.M.A.J., Jan. 9, 1971, p. 4; previous #AMP 562; prev. # 84.6.21.
Research Facts
The garden party was given for Canadian physicians at Oxford by Sir William Osler in 1912.
Less detail

4101 records – page 1 of 411.