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pharmacy bottle in protective case

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact14398
Dates
1850
1900
circa 1850-1900
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Dr. James (Jim) Robert Ronald McCrindle Collection
Category
Pharmacy and Drug Artifacts
Classification
Pharmacy, General
Accession Number
1989.10.14 a-c
Description
Circular clear hand blown glass pharmacy bottle (a) with penny style stopper fits into two piece honey coloured olive wood treenware case, bottom (b) with screw closure into tight fitting top (c); finely finished wood shows some grain; cotton wadding in bottom and top to cushion glass bottle; stopp…
  4 images  
Accession Number
1989.10.14 a-c
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Dr. James (Jim) Robert Ronald McCrindle Collection
Category
Pharmacy and Drug Artifacts
Classification
Pharmacy, General
MeSH Heading
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Pharmacy -- instrumentation
Description
Circular clear hand blown glass pharmacy bottle (a) with penny style stopper fits into two piece honey coloured olive wood treenware case, bottom (b) with screw closure into tight fitting top (c); finely finished wood shows some grain; cotton wadding in bottom and top to cushion glass bottle; stopper is stuck in bottle; 15.0 cm tall when assembled; 2 ounce bottle marked on bottom of base.
Number Of Parts
3
Part Names
a - bottle b - case bottom c - case top
Provenance
Acquired from the Academy of Medicine; source: owned and used by Dr. James (Jim) Robert Ronald McCrindle (1862-1952); he probably acquired it in the United Kingdom and brought it to Jamaica in 1904; donated by his granddaughter, Mrs. C. C. James of Kingston, Ontario.
Maker
Ferris & Co.
Site Made (City)
Bristol
Site Made (Country)
England
Dates
1850
1900
circa 1850-1900
Material
wood: orange glass: transparent fabric: cream
Inscriptions
"2 oz"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-A3-9 Row D
Length
a - 13.0 cm b - 9.3 cm c - 6.7 cm
Diameter
a - 3.3 cm b - 4.3 cm c - 4.7 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Bottle with minor white residue inside, treenware in excellent shape, minor surface marks
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Document
Research Facts
Dr. McCrindle was born in Kingston, Jamaica, in 1862 but moved to Scotland in 1882 where he graduated with his degree in general medicine and surgery from the University of Glasgow in 1885; he returned to Jamaica in 1904; the cabinet was brought to Canada by his granddaughter, the donor, in 1975.
This medicine cabinet holds numerous tins for plaster bandages and glass pharmacy bottles handblown to fit the compartments and is a part of the McCrindle Collection 1989.10 and 005009.
'Ferris & Co. established 1770 Bristol England Wholesale and export Druggists manufacturing Chemists makers of surgical instruments and hospital appliances every requisite for the Surgery, Dispensary and Hospital. Merchants, Shippers, and Importers'; from 1887 advertisement. This company used various trade names and the trade name of Ferris & Co. began in 1883. In 1820 was the first time Ferris was included in the trade name, as 'Fry Gibbs & Ferris' on Union Street in Bristol.
Exhibit History
On exhibit: "When Medicine Met Science" - 21 Oct. 2008
Images
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pharmacy bottle in protective case

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact14399
Dates
1850
1900
circa 1890-1900
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Dr. James (Jim) Robert Ronald McCrindle Collection
Category
Pharmacy and Drug Artifacts
Classification
Pharmacy, General
Accession Number
1989.10.15 a-c
Description
Circular clear hand blown glass pharmacy bottle (a) with penny style stopper fits into two piece honey coloured olive wood treenware case, bottom (b) with screw closure into tight fitting top (c); finely finished wood shows some grain; cotton wadding in bottom and top to cushion glass bottle; stopp…
  4 images  
Accession Number
1989.10.15 a-c
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Dr. James (Jim) Robert Ronald McCrindle Collection
Category
Pharmacy and Drug Artifacts
Classification
Pharmacy, General
MeSH Heading
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Pharmacy -- instrumentation
Description
Circular clear hand blown glass pharmacy bottle (a) with penny style stopper fits into two piece honey coloured olive wood treenware case, bottom (b) with screw closure into tight fitting top (c); finely finished wood shows some grain; cotton wadding in bottom and top to cushion glass bottle; stopper is stuck in bottle; 15.0 cm tall when assembled; 2 ounce bottle marked on bottom of base.
Number Of Parts
3
Part Names
a - bottle b - case bottom c - case top
Provenance
Acquired from the Academy of Medicine; source: owned and used by Dr. James (Jim) Robert Ronald McCrindle (1862-1952); he probably acquired it in the United Kingdom and brought it to Jamaica in 1904; donated by his granddaughter, Mrs. C. C. James of Kingston, Ontario.
Maker
Ferris & Co.
Site Made (City)
Bristol
Site Made (Country)
England
Dates
1850
1900
circa 1890-1900
Material
wood: orange glass: transparent fabric: cream
Inscriptions
"2 oz"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-A3-9 Row D
Length
a - 13.0 cm b - 9.3 cm c - 6.7 cm
Diameter
a - 3.3 cm b - 4.3 cm c - 4.7 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Bottle with minor white residue inside, treenware in excellent shape, minor surface marks
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Document
Research Facts
Dr. McCrindle was born in Kingston, Jamaica, in 1862 but moved to Scotland in 1882 where he graduated with his degree in general medicine and surgery from the University of Glasgow in 1885; he returned to Jamaica in 1904; the cabinet was brought to Canada by his granddaughter, the donor, in 1975. This medicine cabinet holds numerous tins for plaster bandages and glass pharmacy bottles handblown to fit the compartments and is a part of the McCrindle Collection 1989.10 and 005009. 'Ferris & Co. established 1770 Bristol England Wholesale and export Druggists manufacturing Chemists makers of surgical instruments and hospital appliances every requisite for the Surgery, Dispensary and Hospital. Merchants, Shippers, and Importers'; from 1887 advertisement. This company used various trade names and the trade name of Ferris & Co. began in 1883. In 1820 was the first time Ferris was included in the trade name, as 'Fry Gibbs & Ferris' on Union Street in Bristol.
Exhibit History
On exhibit: "When Medicine Met Science" - 21 Oct. 2008
Images
Less detail

Fox's glass leech cupping set

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact5498
Dates
1834
1878
circa 1827-1878
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Diagnostic & Treatment Artifacts
Classification
Treatment, General
Patient Care
Treatment
Accession Number
1950.4.1 a-h
Description
Rectangular mahogany case with blue velvet lining the interior (g) containing a 12-blade scarificator (c), clear glass bottle with stopper (f), cupping lamp (a,b), and two large cups (d, e). There is also a small round pad (h) with felt on one side and leather on the other with a small band of leat…
  5 images  
Accession Number
1950.4.1 a-h
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Diagnostic & Treatment Artifacts
Classification
Treatment, General
Patient Care
Treatment
MeSH Heading
Bloodletting -- instrumentation
MM= Cupping -- set
Description
Rectangular mahogany case with blue velvet lining the interior (g) containing a 12-blade scarificator (c), clear glass bottle with stopper (f), cupping lamp (a,b), and two large cups (d, e). There is also a small round pad (h) with felt on one side and leather on the other with a small band of leather, presumably to place one's finger into.
Number Of Parts
8
Part Names
a) cupping lamp ring - Length 3.5 X Width 2.5
b) cupping lamp - Length 8.0 X Width 2.4
c) scarificator - Length 6.0 X Width 5.0 X Depth 6.5
d) glass cup - Length 14.0 X Width 7.5 X Depth 8.0
e) glass cup - Length 15.0 X Width 8.0 X Depth 7.5
f) glass bottle with stopper - Length 8.0 X Diameter 3.8
g) case - Length 26.5 cm x Width 15.0 cm x Depth 10.5 cm
h) leather and felt pad - Length 4.0 X Width 3.0 X Depth 1.5
Provenance
Acquired from the Academy of Medicine; donated by Dr. R. Howey of Owen Sound, Ont.; used by Dr. Allan Cameron, who practised in Owen Sound, Ont. from 1857 to 1912.
Maker
W. B. Hilliard
Site Made (City)
Glasgow
Site Made (Country)
Scotland
Dates
1834
1878
circa 1827-1878
Date Remarks
Date based on the maker's mark -- W. B. Hilliard was established in 1834, and after 1878, W. B. Hilliard became W. B. Hilliard & Sons
Material
wood: brown
velvet: blue
glass: clear
metal: gold
fabric: beige
leather: brown
Inscriptions
On the scarificator (c): "W. B. Hilliard / Glasgow"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D6-7
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Minor scratches on case (g), velvet fading, lamp (a, b) slightly scratched, small crack in glass in (e), and the glass bottle (f) is a bit dirty
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Book
Journal
Website
Reference Comments
"Bloodletting Instruments," Davis & Appel, pp. 26-8; "Lancet," 1827 (12), pp. 238-9
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/33102/33102-h/33102-h.htm#Page_48
The Lancet, vol. 10, iss. 257, pg 559-560, Aug. 02, 1828.
http://www.glasgowwestaddress.co.uk/1888_Book/Hilliard_W_B_&_Sons.htm
Research Facts
Dr. Francis Fox was the house surgeon to the Derbyshire General Dispensary, and in 1827, announced his invention of "glass leeches", a new form of cupping cup with a wide, curved neck and oval belly that hung downwards. This shape imitated the natural shape and manner of hanging of a leech, and so Fox named his invention after them. Fox announced his invention in The Lancet, a prominent medical journal, and in the years after his announcement, continued to provide the journal with updates on how much better the glass leeches performed than regular cups. They made it less likely for the patient to be burned in the process of cupping as the flame was kept farther away from the skin, and the glass leech only needed to be applied twice after scarification instead of the common three times. Fox claimed that his glass leeches could be easily removed by an attendant so that the operator need not even be present. The glass leech could draw on average 7 and 3/4 ounces of blood in 16 minutes.
W. B. Hilliard was established in 1834, in Glasgow, Scotland; there were four different business addresses until about 1920. In 1878, it became W. B. Hilliard & Sons when Hilliard brought his two sons on as partners. Joseph B. Hilliard owned an instrument case which was carried by Dr. Livingstone, the explorer.
Cupping was popular in the 19th century; heated cups would be applied to bring blood up to the surface of the skin; lamps, syringes and / or stop-cocks were often included in cupping sets to help create a vacuum using heat. Often, a piece of lint and/or paper was lit on fire and placed in the cup. In dry cupping, the cup would be applied first and the blood drawn using the scarificator after the blood was brought to the surface. In wet cupping, blood was drawn first with the scarificator and then the cup was applied, so that the blood was drawn out by the vacuum and pooled in the cup.
Images
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