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bedside disposal bag

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact12337
Dates
1970
1980
circa 1970 - 1980
Collection
Kingston General Hospital Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Accession Number
998030001
Description
A brown paper bedside disposal bag; rectangular shape; has an adhesive tab at the top of the bag; has printed text with manufacturer and product information.
Accession Number
998030001
Collection
Kingston General Hospital Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
MeSH Heading
Nursing Care
Equipment and Supplies, Hospital
Motion Sickness
Description
A brown paper bedside disposal bag; rectangular shape; has an adhesive tab at the top of the bag; has printed text with manufacturer and product information.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Kingston General Hospital
Maker
Trutest
Site Made (City)
London
Site Made (State)
Ontario
Site Made (Country)
Canada
Dates
1970
1980
circa 1970 - 1980
Date Remarks
Donor information.
Material
paper: brown
ink: red
Inscriptions
Printed on the front of the bag: "TRUTEST // FLAME RETARDANT-MOISTURE RESISTANT // BEDSIDE DISPOSAL BAG // INSTRUCTIONS FOR USE: // Self-adhesive tab. To expose sticky side // of tape, remove paper backing.".
Permanent Location
Storage Room 2005
2005-2-3 Box 16
Dimension Notes
Length 33.1 cm x Width 15.4 cm
Condition Remarks
A bit of staining on the front of the bag; a few tears on the sides of the bag halfway down; a tear near the adhesive strip on the back of the bag.
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Internet
Reference Comments
Web site: Wikipedia
Research Facts
Also know as a sic sac, barf bag, airsick bag or emesis containment system which is better than the spills from a standard emesis basin. Airlines also use these disposal bags for motion sickness.
Less detail

bedside disposal bag

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact12338
Dates
1970
1980
circa 1970 -1980
Collection
Kingston General Hospital Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Accession Number
998030002
Description
A brown paper bedside disposal bag; rectangular shape; has an adhesive tab at the top of the bag; has printed text with manufacturer and product information.
  2 images  
Accession Number
998030002
Collection
Kingston General Hospital Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
MeSH Heading
Nursing Care
Equipment and Supplies, Hospital
Motion Sickness
Description
A brown paper bedside disposal bag; rectangular shape; has an adhesive tab at the top of the bag; has printed text with manufacturer and product information.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Kingston General Hospital.
Maker
Trutest
Site Made (City)
London
Site Made (State)
Ontario
Site Made (Country)
Canada
Dates
1970
1980
circa 1970 -1980
Date Remarks
Donor information.
Material
paper: brown
ink: red
Inscriptions
Printed on the front of the bag: "TRUTEST // FLAME RETARDANT-MOISTURE RESISTANT // BEDSIDE DISPOSAL BAG // INSTRUCTIONS FOR USE: // Self-adhesive tab. To expose sticky side // of tape, remove paper backing.".
Permanent Location
Storage Room 2005
2005-2-3 Box 16
Dimension Notes
Length 33.1 cm x Width 15.4 cm
Condition Remarks
A short tear on the bag half way down.
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Internet
JPG
Reference Comments
Web site: Wikipedia; CD #3
Research Facts
Also known as a sic sac, barf bag, airsick bag or emesis containment system which is better than the spills from a standard emesis basin. Airlines also use thee disposal bags for motion sickness.
Images
Less detail
Dates
1946
1985
circa 1946-1985
Collection
Museum of Health Care at Kingston Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Accession Number
006003001
Description
A collapsible rolling cart; consists of four rubber wheels each with a metal pole which curves at about a 40 degree angle; the front wheel poles and the back wheels poles cross each other and are attached in the center with a loose screw; there is a flat tray at the bottom which is connected via tw…
  1 image  
Accession Number
006003001
Collection
Museum of Health Care at Kingston Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
MeSH Heading
Equipment and Supplies, Hospital
Description
A collapsible rolling cart; consists of four rubber wheels each with a metal pole which curves at about a 40 degree angle; the front wheel poles and the back wheels poles cross each other and are attached in the center with a loose screw; there is a flat tray at the bottom which is connected via two poles that connect the right and left sides of the cart; at the top of the poles is a green tabletop; the front wheel poles continue up above the table to form a handle at the back; the back wheels rotate, the front are fixed.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Found in Collection.
Maker
Technibilt Corporation
Site Made (City)
Burbank
Site Made (State)
California
Site Made (Country)
United States of America
Dates
1946
1985
circa 1946-1985
Date Remarks
The Technibilt Corporation operated out of Burbank, California from 1946 until 1985 when they moved to North Carolina.
Material
metal: silver
rubber: black
linoleum?: green
Inscriptions
"MANUFACTURED BY // TECHNIBILT // CORPORATION // ONE WEST ALAMEDA AVENUE // BURBANK CALIFORNIA 91502" printed on a transparent sticker on the handle bar - barely visible
"northAmerican // VAN LINES // LOT // H // ITEM // 129" printed on an orange sticker stuck to the table
Permanent Location
Storage Room W1
W1-5-2
Dimension Notes
Length 87.0 cm x Width 45.7 cm x Length 88.5 cm
Condition Remarks
Some minor wear, and some old tape residue on the cart.
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Internet
JPG
Reference Comments
Internet: "Technibilt"; CD #1
Images
Less detail

hair trimmer comb

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact15217
Dates
1960
1980
circa 1960-1980
Category
Home Health Care
Hygiene
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Dermatology
Home Health
Hygiene
Patient Care
Accession Number
015011014 a-e
Description
Yellow plastic trapezoidal hair trimmer comb with two razor blades, one on each side and both lined with plastic guards meant to comb through hair at two different short lengths such as men's side burns, neck or beard; there are raised letters in the plastic on both flat sides and on the back there…
  5 images  
Accession Number
015011014 a-e
Category
Home Health Care
Hygiene
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Dermatology
Home Health
Hygiene
Patient Care
MeSH Heading
Dermatology
Skin Care
Hair
Hair Removal -- instrumentation
Hygiene
Description
Yellow plastic trapezoidal hair trimmer comb with two razor blades, one on each side and both lined with plastic guards meant to comb through hair at two different short lengths such as men's side burns, neck or beard; there are raised letters in the plastic on both flat sides and on the back there is a square of plastic which is used to open and close the razor; the razor splits in half so there are two flat yellow pieces inside of which the three razor blades sit, two on one side and one on the other.
Number Of Parts
5
Part Names
a - plastic case: Length 8.5 cm X Width 6.3 cm X Height 1.5 cm
b - plastic case: Length 8.5 cm X Width 6.3 cm X Height 0.5 cm
c-e - razors: Length 4.3 cm X Width 2.3 cm
Provenance
Belonged to donor.
Dates
1960
1980
circa 1960-1980
Date Remarks
Based on the inventions of the safety razor and the twin-blade razor.
Material
plastic: yellow
metal: black
ink: green
Inscriptions
Raised on yellow plastic a): "HAIR // MADE IN BRITISH HONG KONG"; raised on yellow plastic b): "TRIMMING // RAZOR CUT // TO OPEN // PRESS & SLIDE LEFT // SIDE BURNS NECK"; printed on razor blades c,d,e): "Old Man // TRADE MARK".
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-E5-4
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Copy Type
original
Reference Comments
"The Unusual and Deeply Sexist History of Women Removing Their Body Hair", Mic.com, by Rachel Lubit, August 12, 2016: https://www.mic.com/articles/151191/the-unusual-and-deeply-sexist-history-of-women-removing-their-body-hair
"The History of Female Hair Removal", Women's Museum of California, Nov. 22, 2017: https://womensmuseum.wordpress.com/2017/11/22/the-history-of-female-hair-removal/
"It Started With Harper’s Bazaar…" Outskirts of the Twenties, January 5, 2014: https://outskirtsofthetwenties.wordpress.com/2014/01/05/it-started-with-harpers-bazaar/
"How Shaving Works" by Marshall Brain, Howstuffworks, June 26, 2006: https://health.howstuffworks.com/skin-care/men/shaving-tips/shaving1.htm
"Hair Trimmer Comb: Barber-ism Begins At Home", by bohus, October 7th, 2010: https://www.retrothing.com/2010/10/hair-trimmer-comb-barber-ism-begins-at-home.html
Research Facts
Gillette released the first "safety razor" in 1901 and advertised it heavily. Shaving became inexpensive and easier for men to do more often. In World War One, soldiers were required to shave their faces in order to fit into gas masks. Returning soldiers and advertising from companies like Gillette made being clean shaven fashionable for men, Beards were then unfashionable until the 1960s, and it remains in fashion for men to be clean shaven.
In Ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, hair removal was common for both men and women, as it was considered clean and beautiful. They used tweezers, waxes, and pumice stones.
In the Elizabethan Era in Europe, England's Queen Elizabeth I set the trend of women shaping their eyebrows and removing moustaches, as well as removing the hair about the forehead so one's face appreared longer.
In 1915, an ad in the magazine Harper's Bazaar and Gillette's creation of the Milady Décolleté were among the things which urged women to be rid of hair under their arms, and as hemlines rose in the 1940s and 50s, women began shaving their legs in larger numbers and more regularly, a standard which persists to this day.
This hair trimmer comb was meant to be used in order to extend time between hair cuts by simply being combed through the hair to cut off the ends. It cost a dollar or less, and users ran the risk of cutting off much more hair than they originally wished.
Images
Less detail
Dates
1980
1990
1980-1990
Collection
Barber / Brunke Family Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Accession Number
015020005
Description
Cream plastic covered infant foam rubber mattress with glued seams.
  2 images  
Accession Number
015020005
Collection
Barber / Brunke Family Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
MeSH Heading
Pediatrics
Household Articles
Description
Cream plastic covered infant foam rubber mattress with glued seams.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Belonged to donor's family (Barber & Brunke) and her parents used it for her and her brother in the 1930s. Her father constructed the rolling base to allow her mother to move it easily around the house. The Barbers and the Brunkes’ have lived in Kingston for a few generations.
Dates
1980
1990
1980-1990
Date Remarks
Donor remarks and dates on base
Material
plastic: cream
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0007
0007 Closet L
Length
77.0 cm
Width
31.3 cm
Depth
5.0 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
showing minor cracks at one end, exposed rubber at one end and at the other is a puncture through plastic and rubber with plastic peeled back
Images
Less detail
Dates
1940
1990
circa 1940-1990
Collection
Colonel S. M. Polson Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Accession Number
999021002
Description
Oval ceramic boat shaped invalid feeder; two part handle; handle is in line with the spout; spout opening is part of the body; opening without cover; partially glazed bottom; manufacturing country of origin on base
Accession Number
999021002
Collection
Colonel S. M. Polson Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
MeSH Heading
Feeding Methods
Home Health Nursing
MM= Anesthesia, Inhalation -- accessories
MM= Feeding Dish
Nursing Care -- instrumentation
Description
Oval ceramic boat shaped invalid feeder; two part handle; handle is in line with the spout; spout opening is part of the body; opening without cover; partially glazed bottom; manufacturing country of origin on base
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Originally owned and used by Mrs. Nancy C. Polson.
Site Made (Country)
Japan
Dates
1940
1990
circa 1940-1990
Material
ceramic: cream
ink: green
Inscriptions
Stamped on bottom: "MADE // IN // JAPAN"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1
Length
16.8
Width
6.4
Height
6.2
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Shows wear on the bottom.
Copy Type
original
Research Facts
Invalid feeders’ also known as sick cups are designed to provide liquid or semi solid nourishment in time of illness or incapacity. There are many different shapes for invalid feeders. Some of the shapes are defined as infant or invalid feeders, however it seems that each manufacture used both terms interchangeably depending on the market they are targeting.
Less detail
Dates
1940
1980
circa 1940-1980
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Accession Number
016001003
Description
White oval ceramic pap boat shaped invalid feeder decorated with hand painted deep blue Delft decoration in the 'onion' pattern; open handle on back with spout pointing straight ahead; without manufacturers marks; spout opening is part of body; unglazed base.
  1 image  
Accession Number
016001003
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
MeSH Heading
Feeding Methods
Home Health Nursing
MM= Anesthesia, Inhalation -- accessories
MM= Feeding Dish
Nursing Care -- instrumentation
Description
White oval ceramic pap boat shaped invalid feeder decorated with hand painted deep blue Delft decoration in the 'onion' pattern; open handle on back with spout pointing straight ahead; without manufacturers marks; spout opening is part of body; unglazed base.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and Alice Roeder.
Dates
1940
1980
circa 1940-1980
Date Remarks
Research
Material
ceramic: white
ink: blue, gold
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1
Length
18.0 cm
Width
7.2 cm
Height
6.6 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Minor crack on left side from base to opening
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Documents
Book
eBook
Internet
Reference Comments
Allison, Eileen Michael. Ceramic Invalid Feeders, Pap Boats, and Baby Bottles of the 19th & Twentieth Century. Canada: E.M. Allison, 1997.
Campbell, Gordon. The Grove Encyclopedia of Decorative Arts. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2006. 2006. Accessed August 18, 2016. http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780195189483.001.0001/acref-9780195189483
Patelisova, Helena. "The Layers of a Blue Onion." 3NTA. April 25, 2015. Accessed August 19, 2016. http://www.3nta.com/the-layers-of-a-blue-onion/.
Donor file
Research Facts
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and sister Alice Roeder who was a nurse. The large collection was made up of invalid feeders, hot water bottles, eye washers, bedpans, and female urinals.
Invalid feeders were made for both infants and adults. Originally sold for home health care purposes, they were ornately decorated and gilded, often with transfer prints and gilding. Many of these transfer prints were cheaper to produce and became popular in the 19th century. The most common color is blue, and often the same transfer print patterns can be found on popular dinner sets. All prints were applied to the feeders prior to glazing. These transfer patterns were often not shape specific. The results of general print patterns are overlapping areas or areas where a pattern that was split is showing to accommodate the shape of the feeder. Plain invalid feeders were often white and produced for home health care for the poor. By the late 19th and early 20th century, painting ceramics became a popular pastime for women in United States of America, and England. This influence produced a resurgence in hand painted invalid feeders, and popularity in plain white ceramic feeders. Many of the plain feeders were painted in homes or establishments, and once completed sent back to the manufacturer for firing. These are often identified because of the shade of blue is different and less bright than the shade used in print pattern transfers. The invalid feeders produced after the 19th century that were plain mark the shift of the invalid feeder to a more utilitarian purpose for professional use by nurses in hospitals. There were many manufacturers of invalid feeders marketing similar products for babies and adults. These manufactures would sometimes mark the feeder with a logo, the shape number, pattern number, and where it was made.
There are many different shapes for invalid feeders. Some of the shapes are defined as infant or invalid feeders, however it seems that each manufacture used both terms interchangeably. The boat shaped, which looks very similar to a gravy boat, originally evolved from the pap boat shape. It has a straight spout, main opening in the top, and an open handle in the back.
The design, like other medical ceramic ware, was decorated in the popular Blue Onion or Strawflower designs. The origins of this popular pattern originated from high quality Chinese porcelain decorated in cobalt designs. This tradition of blue and white porcelain dates back to the 8th and 9th centuries. When the wealthy Dutch and European merchants began exporting these wares back to Europe, the Meissen Porcelain Manufacturer began producing inspired blue ware called “onion china”. Many other manufacturers followed suit to produce the highly popular design, and the name evolved to blue onion. Each manufacturer had its own variation of the blue onion design. The original Chinese design was actually a floral design with pomegranates and peaches. These designs were so popular on all types ceramic and porcelain ware, that manufacturers produced transfer pattern outlines to reduce production time.
Majority of the invalid boat feeders produced in the 19th century were ceramic. Ceramics in an ambiguous term as it can signify an artefact made out of multiple kinds of clay, and different firing techniques. Ceramic can also be used to signify clay ware that has been fired at temperatures less then 500 °C. One of the many types of ceramic ware that falls under this umbrella term is porcelain. The term porcelain is incorrectly used interchangeably with ceramics. Porcelain ware is from fine white clay, it is characteristically fired below 1300 °C, and is translucent. In addition, to appearance it is generally very hard, durable, and makes a distinct ringing noise when tapped. Like the term ceramics, there are types of artefacts that fall under the term porcelain, such as fine china and bone china.
Invalid feeders are designed to provide liquid or semi solid nourishment in time of illness or incapacity. There are many different shapes for invalid feeders. Some of the shapes are defined as infant or invalid feeders, however it seems that each manufacture used both terms interchangeably. The boat shaped, which looks very similar to a gravy boat, originally evolved from the pap boat shape. It has a straight spout, main opening in the top, and an open handle in the back. This is also known as an infant feeder prior to the development of baby milk bottles. Manufacturers would market this item as both invalid and infant feeders depending on the market they are targeting.
Images
Less detail
Dates
1960
1980
circa 1960-1980
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Accession Number
016001009
Description
White oval ceramic pap boat shaped invalid feeder hand painted floral in brown and blue with gilt trim along opening, middle of handle and spout; open handle with two raised bumps on back with spout pointing straight ahead; large oval top opening; without manufacturers marks; spout opening is part …
  1 image  
Accession Number
016001009
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
MeSH Heading
Feeding Methods
Home Health Nursing
MM= Anesthesia, Inhalation -- accessories
MM= Feeding Dish
Nursing Care -- instrumentation
Description
White oval ceramic pap boat shaped invalid feeder hand painted floral in brown and blue with gilt trim along opening, middle of handle and spout; open handle with two raised bumps on back with spout pointing straight ahead; large oval top opening; without manufacturers marks; spout opening is part of body; glazed base
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and Alice Roeder.
Dates
1960
1980
circa 1960-1980
Date Remarks
Research
Material
ceramic: white
paint: brown, blue, yellow, black
Inscriptions
"136 / 929"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1
Length
15.2 cm
Width
6.0 cm
Height
5.6 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Gilding with minor wear
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Documents
Book
eBook
Internet
Reference Comments
Allison, Eileen Michael. Ceramic Invalid Feeders, Pap Boats, and Baby Bottles of the 19th & Twentieth Century. Canada: E.M. Allison, 1997.
Campbell, Gordon. The Grove Encyclopedia of Decorative Arts. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2006. 2006. Accessed August 18, 2016. http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780195189483.001.0001/acref-9780195189483
Donor file
Research Facts
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and sister Alice Roeder, a retired nurse. The collection consists of various eras and types of invalid / infant feeders, infant milk bottles, medicine spoons, urinals and reference material.
Invalid feeders are designed to provide liquid or semi solid nourishment in time of illness or incapacity. There are many different shapes for invalid feeders. Some of the shapes are defined as infant or invalid feeders, however it seems that each manufacture used both terms interchangeably. The boat shaped, which looks very similar to a gravy boat, originally evolved from the pap boat shape. It has a straight spout, main opening in the top, and an open handle in the back. This is also known as an infant feeder prior to the development of baby milk bottles. Manufacturers would market this item as both invalid and infant feeders depending on the market they are targeting.
Images
Less detail
Dates
1960
1990
circa 1960-1990
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Accession Number
016001014
Description
Oval ceramic boat shaped invalid feeder with spout turned on curve; iridescent glaze with mottled gold band around opening; spout and handle opening is part of body; unglazed base.
  1 image  
Accession Number
016001014
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
MeSH Heading
Feeding Methods
Home Health Nursing
MM= Anesthesia, Inhalation -- accessories
MM= Feeding Dish
Nursing Care -- instrumentation
Description
Oval ceramic boat shaped invalid feeder with spout turned on curve; iridescent glaze with mottled gold band around opening; spout and handle opening is part of body; unglazed base.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and Alice Roeder.
Dates
1960
1990
circa 1960-1990
Material
ceramic: white, irridescent
ink: gold
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1
Length
15.2 cm
Width
5.4 cm
Height
5.5 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Gold around opening and spout looks to be fading
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Documents
Book
eBook
Internet
Reference Comments
Allison, Eileen Michael. Ceramic Invalid Feeders, Pap Boats, and Baby Bottles of the 19th & Twentieth Century. Canada: E. M. Allison, 1997.
Donor file
Research Facts
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and sister Alice Roeder, a retired nurse. The collection consists of various eras and types of invalid / infant feeders, infant milk bottles, medicine spoons, urinals and reference material.
Invalid feeders’ also known as sick cups are designed to provide liquid or semi solid nourishment in time of illness or incapacity. There are many different shapes for invalid feeders. Some of the shapes are defined as infant or invalid feeders, however it seems that each manufacture used both terms interchangeably depending on the market they are targeting.
Images
Less detail
Dates
1960
1990
circa 1960-1990
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Accession Number
016001015
Description
Clear glass invalid feeder in shape of bottle turned on side, handle underneath the spout; minor surface texturing; back of feeder is embossed country of origin; thick circular open handle; spout pointing straight ahead; spout and handle opening is part of body.
  1 image  
Accession Number
016001015
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
MeSH Heading
Feeding Methods
Home Health Nursing
MM= Anesthesia, Inhalation -- accessories
MM= Feeding Dish
Nursing Care -- instrumentation
Description
Clear glass invalid feeder in shape of bottle turned on side, handle underneath the spout; minor surface texturing; back of feeder is embossed country of origin; thick circular open handle; spout pointing straight ahead; spout and handle opening is part of body.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and Alice Roeder.
Dates
1960
1990
circa 1960-1990
Material
glass: transparent
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1
Length
16.3 cm
Width
6.3 cm
Height
6.0 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Documents
Book
eBook
Internet
Reference Comments
Allison, Eileen Michael. Ceramic Invalid Feeders, Pap Boats, and Baby Bottles of the 19th & Twentieth Century. Canada: E. M. Allison, 1997.
Donor file
Research Facts
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and sister Alice Roeder, a retired nurse. The collection consists of various eras and types of invalid / infant feeders, infant milk bottles, medicine spoons, urinals and reference material.
Invalid feeders’ also known as sick cups are designed to provide liquid or semi solid nourishment in time of illness or incapacity. There are many different shapes for invalid feeders. Some of the shapes are defined as infant or invalid feeders, however it seems that each manufacture used both terms interchangeably depending on the market they are targeting.
Images
Less detail

20 records – page 1 of 2.