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Army field case

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact5510
Dates
1864
circa 1864
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Diagnostic & Treatment Artifacts
Military Medicine
Classification
Military Medicine
General Surgery
Accession Number
1954.6.2 a-v
Description
Brass-bound wooden box (v) with purple velvet lining; contains surgical instruments (a) Hay's saw, (b) hacksaw, (c) bone cutters, (d) bone forceps, (e) bullet extractor, (f-h) sounds, (i) trephine handle, (j-m) knives, (n) saw, (o-t) scalpels, (u) tray).
  2 images  
Accession Number
1954.6.2 a-v
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Diagnostic & Treatment Artifacts
Military Medicine
Classification
Military Medicine
General Surgery
MeSH Heading
Military Medicine -- army
Military Medicine -- instruments
Military Medicine -- surgery
Military Medicine -- Peacetime
Amputation -- instrumentation
Trephining --instrumentation
Military Medicine
Description
Brass-bound wooden box (v) with purple velvet lining; contains surgical instruments (a) Hay's saw, (b) hacksaw, (c) bone cutters, (d) bone forceps, (e) bullet extractor, (f-h) sounds, (i) trephine handle, (j-m) knives, (n) saw, (o-t) scalpels, (u) tray).
Number Of Parts
22
Part Names
a - Hay's saw - Size: Length 16.0 cm
b - hacksaw - Size: Length 40.0 cm
c - bone cutters - Size: Length 26.0 cm
d - bone forceps - Size: Length 20.0 cm
e - bullet extractor - Size: Length 25.0 cm
f - sound - Size: Length 29.0 cm
g - sound - Size: Length 29.0 cm
h - sound - Size: Length 29.0 cm
i - trephine handle - Size: Length 10.0 cm
j - knife - Size: Length 38.0 cm
k - knife - Size: Length 33.0 cm
l - knife - Size: Length 32.0 cm
m - knife - Size: Length 22.0 cm
n - saw - Size: Length 21.0 cm
o - scalpel
p - scalpel
q - scalpel
r - scalpel
s - scalpel
t - scalpel
u - tray - Size: Length 40.5 cm x Width 16.0 cm x Depth 4.0 cm
v - box - Size: Length 43.0 cm x Width 18.5 cm x Depth 9.5 cm
Provenance
Acquired from the Academy of Medicine; donated by Mrs. F. Wilson and Mrs. I. Macdonnell; owned and used by Dr. R.W. Forrest, who practised in Mount Forest in 1866.
Maker
A. L. Hernstein & Son
Site Made (City)
New York
Site Made (State)
New York
Site Made (Country)
United States of America
Dates
1864
circa 1864
Date Remarks
Date of use inscribed on bottom of box
Material
wood
metal
fabric: purple
Inscriptions
Bottom of box is inscribed in ink: "R.W. Forrest Acting Asst. Surgeon U.S.A. 1864"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-E1-2
Condition Remarks
Velvet faded; #3: minor scratches on the surfacr of the case and metal inlay; crack in the wood on the proper right side, 6.0 cm long; metal inlay worn but no active corrosion; significant cracks in the outer bottom surface of the case; one along the near edge 42.0 cm along length of case, and another along the front edge, 23.0 cm long; no cracks in any instrument handles except (b) the amputation saw, 2.0 cm long; the extra saw blade has a patch of active corrosion at the tip, 1.7 cm x 0.5 cm, and 2.2 cm x 0.4 cm; (c) dilator has four patches of active corrosion on one side and six patches on the other; possible active corrosion at the midpoint of the Hey's saw; felt lining is moderately faded in the tray and slightly faded in the top and bottom; one handle of inner tray (proper left) is broken; felt and wood worn on bottom level where large pliers are stored.
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Book
JPG
Reference Comments
York County Atlas, 1879; A.L. Hernstein & Co. catalogue, 1870, p. 10 No. 9 "Army Field Case." CD #UHN
Exhibit History
"When Medicine Met Science" exhibit, Ann Baillie Building, April 29, 2003
Images
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Cardiac Stimulants [celluloid phonograph cylinder]

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact7068
Dates
1908
1912
circa 1908-1912
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Education Artifacts
Classification
Education
Accession Number
1977.11.34 a-c
Description
Black celluloid phonograph cylinder in the original lidded blue cardboard container; lid and top edge of cylinder have the series number, title, and author's last name; holds four minutes of recorded information.
  1 image  
Accession Number
1977.11.34 a-c
Author
Dr. H.C. Wood Junior, Prof. of Therapeutics
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Education Artifacts
Classification
Education
MeSH Heading
Teaching Materials
Audiovisual Aids
Education, Medical
Cardiology
Description
Black celluloid phonograph cylinder in the original lidded blue cardboard container; lid and top edge of cylinder have the series number, title, and author's last name; holds four minutes of recorded information.
Number Of Parts
3
Part Names
a - lid - Size: Depth 1.4 cm x Diam. 6.5 cm
b - container - Size: Length 11.0 cm x Diam. 6.0 cm
c - cylinder - Size: Length 10.0 cm x Diam. 5.6 cm
Provenance
Acquired from the Academy of Medicine; source: Percy Skuy, Toronto, Ont.
Maker
The Medicophone Post-Graduate Co.
Site Made (City)
New York
Site Made (State)
New York
Site Made (Country)
United States of America
Dates
1908
1912
circa 1908-1912
Date Remarks
Manufacturer's dates for production of celluloid cylinders.
Material
ink: black
cardboard: light blue; beige; black
plastic: black
Inscriptions
Printed on outside of canister: "THE // U-S // Everlasting // RECORD"; "Greatest in volume, sweetest and purest in tone // Unbreakable and wears forever // THE // MEDICOPHONE POST- // GRADUATE CO. Sells this record upon the // express condition that it will // not be sold to any un- // authorized dealer, nor used // in making duplicates, and // that it shall not be sold or // offered for sale by any pur- // chaser thereof for less than // $1.00. Any breach of this // condition terminates the // licence to use and vend this record. // NOTICE: // This record will fit any // cylinder machine and can // be reproduced or played by // cylinder phonograph // that plays the ordinary four // minute musical record by // slowing down the speed of // machine to 80 revolutions // per minute."
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0007
0007-R2-3
Condition Remarks
#2: Shows wear around edges; plastic bag around cylinder adhered in several areas and bulks out the container.
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Internet
Reference Comments
On-line articles "Cylinder Preservation and Digitization Project - U.S. Everlasting Cylinders"; "Phonograph Cylinder"; CD #UHN
Research Facts
The phonograph was invented by Thomas Edison; he patented it on 18 July 1877 as the first device for recording and playing sound; his first attempt was using telephone messages; his first test used waxed paper. Early cylinder machines of the late 1880s and 1890s were often sold with recording attachments. The ability to record as well as to play back sound was an advantage to cylinder phonographs over the competition from cheaper disc phonographs that began to be mass-marketed at the end of the 1890s, as the disc system machines could be used only to play back pre-recorded sound. Edison Records closed down in 1929, and Thomas Edison died in 1931. In 1906, the Indestructable Record Company began mass-marketing cylinder records made of celluloid, an early hard plastic that would not break if dropped and could be played thousands of times without wearing out. This hard, inflexible material could not be shaved and recorded over like wax cylinders, but had the advantage of being a nearly perfect record. The U.S. Phonograph Company of Cleveland, Ohio, produced both two- and four-minute cylinders under its own label, "U.S. Everlasting Records," and under the Lakeside label for Montgomery Ward department stores. Between 1908 and 1912, more than 1,000 titles were released in three series: popular, foreign language, and grand opera. Like Edison, Blue Amberols, and indestructible cylinders, Everlasting cylinders were made of celluloid, but their sound quality is superior to either of them. The Medicophone Post-Graduate Co., a part of U.S. Everlasting Records, produced a series of recordings to provide professional medical advice on a variety of diseases and topics for physicians. Cylinder is noted as series title # X-256. In 1968, the celluloid cylinders were professionally recorded on magnetic tape by the Syracuse University Libraries Re-recording Laboratory. The complete series is stored on a master and duplicate reels. This title is found on reels 1977.11.44 and .48.
Images
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Cardiac Stimulants Continued -- Strophanthus, Aconite, Vertrum [celluloid phonograph cylinder]

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact7069
Dates
1908
1912
circa 1908-1912
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Education Artifacts
Classification
Education
Accession Number
1977.11.35 a-c
Description
Black celluloid phonograph cylinder in the original lidded blue cardboard container; lid and top edge of cylinder have the series number, title, and author's last name; holds four minutes of recorded information.
  1 image  
Accession Number
1977.11.35 a-c
Author
Dr. H.C. Wood Junior, Prof. of Therapeutics
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Education Artifacts
Classification
Education
MeSH Heading
Teaching Materials
Audiovisual Aids
Education, Medical
Cardiology
Description
Black celluloid phonograph cylinder in the original lidded blue cardboard container; lid and top edge of cylinder have the series number, title, and author's last name; holds four minutes of recorded information.
Number Of Parts
3
Part Names
a - lid - Size: Depth 1.4 cm x Diam. 6.5 cm
b - container - Size: Length 11.0 cm x Diam. 6.0 cm
c - cylinder - Size: Length 10.0 cm x Diam. 5.6 cm
Provenance
Acquired from the Academy of Medicine; source: Percy Skuy, Toronto, Ont.
Maker
The Medicophone Post-Graduate Co.
Site Made (City)
New York
Site Made (State)
New York
Site Made (Country)
United States of America
Dates
1908
1912
circa 1908-1912
Date Remarks
Manufacturer's dates for production of celluloid cylinders.
Material
ink: black
cardboard: light blue; beige; black
plastic: black
Inscriptions
Printed on outside of canister: "THE // U-S // Everlasting // RECORD"; "Greatest in volume, sweetest and purest in tone // Unbreakable and wears forever // THE // MEDICOPHONE POST- // GRADUATE CO. Sells this record upon the // express condition that it will // not be sold to any un- // authorized dealer, nor used // in making duplicates, and // that it shall not be sold or // offered for sale by any pur- // chaser thereof for less than // $1.00. Any breach of this // condition terminates the // licence to use and vend this record. // NOTICE: // This record will fit any // cylinder machine and can // be reproduced or played by // cylinder phonograph // that plays the ordinary four // minute musical record by // slowing down the speed of // machine to 80 revolutions // per minute."
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0007
0007-R2-3
Condition Remarks
#2: Shows wear around edges; plastic bag around cylinder adhered in several areas and bulks out the container.
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Internet
Reference Comments
On-line articles "Cylinder Preservation and Digitization Project - U.S. Everlasting Cylinders"; "Phonograph Cylinder"; CD #UHN
Research Facts
The phonograph was invented by Thomas Edison; he patented it on 18 July 1877 as the first device for recording and playing sound; his first attempt was using telephone messages; his first test used waxed paper. Early cylinder machines of the late 1880s and 1890s were often sold with recording attachments. The ability to record as well as to play back sound was an advantage to cylinder phonographs over the competition from cheaper disc phonographs that began to be mass-marketed at the end of the 1890s, as the disc system machines could be used only to play back pre-recorded sound. Edison Records closed down in 1929, and Thomas Edison died in 1931. In 1906, the Indestructable Record Company began mass-marketing cylinder records made of celluloid, an early hard plastic that would not break if dropped and could be played thousands of times without wearing out. This hard, inflexible material could not be shaved and recorded over like wax cylinders, but had the advantage of being a nearly perfect record. The U.S. Phonograph Company of Cleveland, Ohio, produced both two- and four-minute cylinders under its own label, "U.S. Everlasting Records," and under the Lakeside label for Montgomery Ward department stores. Between 1908 and 1912, more than 1,000 titles were released in three series: popular, foreign language, and grand opera. Like Edison, Blue Amberols, and indestructible cylinders, Everlasting cylinders were made of celluloid, but their sound quality is superior to either of them. The Medicophone Post-Graduate Co., a part of U.S. Everlasting Records, produced a series of recordings to provide professional medical advice on a variety of diseases and topics for physicians. Cylinder is noted as series title # X-259. In 1968, the celluloid cylinders were professionally recorded on magnetic tape by the Syracuse University Libraries Re-recording Laboratory. The complete series is stored on a master and duplicate reels. This title is found on reels 1977.11.44 and .48.
Images
Less detail

Diagnosis and Treatment of Acute and Chronic Mastitis [celluloid phonograph cylinder]

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact7052
Dates
1908
1912
circa 1908-1912
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Education Artifacts
Classification
Education
Accession Number
1977.11.2 a-c
Description
Black celluloid phonograph cylinder in the original lidded blue cardboard container; lid and top edge of cylinder have the series number, title, and author's last name; holds four minutes of recorded information.
  1 image  
Accession Number
1977.11.2 a-c
Author
Dr. W. L. Rodman, Prof. of Surgery
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Education Artifacts
Classification
Education
MeSH Heading
Teaching Materials
Audiovisual Aids
Education, Medical
Mastitis
Description
Black celluloid phonograph cylinder in the original lidded blue cardboard container; lid and top edge of cylinder have the series number, title, and author's last name; holds four minutes of recorded information.
Number Of Parts
3
Part Names
a - lid - Size: Depth 1.4 cm x Diam. 6.5 cm
b - container - Size: Length 11.0 cm x Diam. 6.0 cm
c - cylinder - Size: Length 10.0 cm x Diam. 5.6 cm
Provenance
Acquired from the Academy of Medicine; source: Percy Skuy, Toronto, Ont.
Maker
The Medicophone Post-Graduate Co.
Site Made (City)
New York
Site Made (State)
New York
Site Made (Country)
United States of America
Dates
1908
1912
circa 1908-1912
Date Remarks
Manufacturer's dates for production of celluloid cylinders.
Material
ink: black
cardboard: light blue; beige; black
plastic: black
Inscriptions
Printed on outside of canister: "THE // U-S // Everlasting // RECORD"; "Greatest in volume, sweetest and purest in tone // Unbreakable and wears forever // THE // MEDICOPHONE POST- // GRADUATE CO. Sells this record upon the // express condition that it will // not be sold to any un- // authorized dealer, nor used // in making duplicates, and // that it shall not be sold or // offered for sale by any pur- // chaser thereof for less than // $1.00. Any breach of this // condition terminates the // licence to use and vend this record. // NOTICE: // This record will fit any // cylinder machine and can // be reproduced or played by // cylinder phonograph // that plays the ordinary four // minute musical record by // slowing down the speed of // machine to 80 revolutions // per minute."
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0007
0007-R2-3
Condition Remarks
#2: Shows wear around edges; plastic bag around cylinder adhered in several areas and bulks out the container.
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Internet
Reference Comments
On-line articles "Cylinder Preservation and Digitization Project - U.S. Everlasting Cylinders"; "Phonograph Cylinder"; CD #UHN
Research Facts
The phonograph was invented by Thomas Edison; he patented it on 18 July 1877 as the first device for recording and playing sound; his first attempt was using telephone messages; his first test used waxed paper. Early cylinder machines of the late 1880s and 1890s were often sold with recording attachments. The ability to record as well as to play back sound was an advantage to cylinder phonographs over the competition from cheaper disc phonographs that began to be mass-marketed at the end of the 1890s, as the disc system machines could be used only to play back pre-recorded sound. Edison Records closed down in 1929, and Thomas Edison died in 1931. In 1906, the Indestructable Record Company began mass-marketing cylinder records made of celluloid, an early hard plastic that would not break if dropped and could be played thousands of times without wearing out. This hard, inflexible material could not be shaved and recorded over like wax cylinders, but had the advantage of being a nearly perfect record. The U.S. Phonograph Company of Cleveland, Ohio, produced both two- and four-minute cylinders under its own label, "U.S. Everlasting Records," and under the Lakeside label for Montgomery Ward department stores. Between 1908 and 1912, more than 1,000 titles were released in three series: popular, foreign language, and grand opera. Like Edison, Blue Amberols, and indestructible cylinders, Everlasting cylinders were made of celluloid, but their sound quality is superior to either of them. The Medicophone Post-Graduate Co., a part of U.S. Everlasting Records, produced a series of recordings to provide professional medical advice on a variety of diseases and topics for physicians. Cylinder is noted as series title # X-204. In 1968, the celluloid cylinders were professionally recorded on magnetic tape by the Syracuse University Libraries Re-recording Laboratory. The complete series is stored on a master and duplicate reels. This title is found on reels 1977.11.41 and .45.
Images
Less detail

Diagnosis & Management of Normal Pregnancy & the Subjective Signs of Pregnancy [celluloid phonograph cylinder]

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact7048
Dates
1908
1912
circa 1908-1912
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Education Artifacts
Classification
Education
Accession Number
1977.11.16 a-c
Description
Black celluloid phonograph cylinder in the original lidded blue cardboard container; lid and top edge of cylinder have the series number, title, and author's last name; holds four minutes of recorded information.
  1 image  
Accession Number
1977.11.16 a-c
Author
Dr. Barton Cook Hirst, Prof. of Obstetrics
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Education Artifacts
Classification
Education
MeSH Heading
Teaching Materials
Audiovisual Aids
Education, Medical
Obstetrics
Description
Black celluloid phonograph cylinder in the original lidded blue cardboard container; lid and top edge of cylinder have the series number, title, and author's last name; holds four minutes of recorded information.
Number Of Parts
3
Part Names
a - lid - Size: Depth 1.4 cm x Diam. 6.5 cm
b - container - Size: Length 11.0 cm x Diam. 6.0 cm
c - cylinder - Size: Length 10.0 cm x Diam. 5.6 cm
Provenance
Acquired from the Academy of Medicine; source: Percy Skuy, Toronto, Ont.
Maker
The Medicophone Post-Graduate Co.
Site Made (City)
New York
Site Made (State)
New York
Site Made (Country)
United States of America
Dates
1908
1912
circa 1908-1912
Date Remarks
Manufacturer's dates for production of celluloid cylinders.
Material
ink: black
cardboard: light blue; beige; black
plastic: black
Inscriptions
Printed on outside of canister: "THE // U-S // Everlasting // RECORD"; "Greatest in volume, sweetest and purest in tone // Unbreakable and wears forever // THE // MEDICOPHONE POST- // GRADUATE CO. Sells this record upon the // express condition that it will // not be sold to any un- // authorized dealer, nor used // in making duplicates, and // that it shall not be sold or // offered for sale by any pur- // chaser thereof for less than // $1.00. Any breach of this // condition terminates the // licence to use and vend this record. // NOTICE: // This record will fit any // cylinder machine and can // be reproduced or played by // cylinder phonograph // that plays the ordinary four // minute musical record by // slowing down the speed of // machine to 80 revolutions // per minute."
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0007
0007-R2-3
Condition Remarks
#2: Shows wear around edges; plastic bag around cylinder adhered in several areas and bulks out the container.
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Internet
Reference Comments
On-line articles "Cylinder Preservation and Digitization Project - U.S. Everlasting Cylinders"; "Phonograph Cylinder"; CD #UHN
Research Facts
The phonograph was invented by Thomas Edison; he patented it on 18 July 1877 as the first device for recording and playing sound; his first attempt was using telephone messages; his first test used waxed paper. Early cylinder machines of the late 1880s and 1890s were often sold with recording attachments. The ability to record as well as to play back sound was an advantage to cylinder phonographs over the competition from cheaper disc phonographs that began to be mass-marketed at the end of the 1890s, as the disc system machines could be used only to play back pre-recorded sound. Edison Records closed down in 1929, and Thomas Edison died in 1931. In 1906, the Indestructable Record Company began mass-marketing cylinder records made of celluloid, an early hard plastic that would not break if dropped and could be played thousands of times without wearing out. This hard, inflexible material could not be shaved and recorded over like wax cylinders, but had the advantage of being a nearly perfect record. The U.S. Phonograph Company of Cleveland, Ohio, produced both two- and four-minute cylinders under its own label, "U.S. Everlasting Records," and under the Lakeside label for Montgomery Ward department stores. Between 1908 and 1912, more than 1,000 titles were released in three series: popular, foreign language, and grand opera. Like Edison, Blue Amberols, and indestructible cylinders, Everlasting cylinders were made of celluloid, but their sound quality is superior to either of them. The Medicophone Post-Graduate Co., a part of U.S. Everlasting Records, produced a series of recordings to provide professional medical advice on a variety of diseases and topics for physicians. Cylinder is noted as series title # X-221. In 1968, the celluloid cylinders were professionally recorded on magnetic tape by the Syracuse University Libraries Re-recording Laboratory. The complete series is stored on a master and duplicate reels. This title is found on reels 1977.11.40 and .46.
Images
Less detail

Diagnosis of Cancer of the Mammary Gland [celluloid phonograph cylinder]

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact7074
Dates
1908
1912
circa 1908-1912
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Education Artifacts
Classification
Education
Accession Number
1977.11.4 a-c
Description
Black celluloid phonograph cylinder in the original lidded blue cardboard container; lid and top edge of cylinder have the series number, title, and author's last name; holds four minutes of recorded information.
  1 image  
Accession Number
1977.11.4 a-c
Author
Dr. W.L. Rodman, Prof. of Surgery
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Education Artifacts
Classification
Education
MeSH Heading
Teaching Materials
Audiovisual Aids
Education, Medical
Breast Neoplasms
Description
Black celluloid phonograph cylinder in the original lidded blue cardboard container; lid and top edge of cylinder have the series number, title, and author's last name; holds four minutes of recorded information.
Number Of Parts
3
Part Names
a - lid - Size: Depth 1.4 cm x Diam. 6.5 cm
b - container - Size: Length 11.0 cm x Diam. 6.0 cm
c - cylinder - Size: Length 10.0 cm x Diam. 5.6 cm
Provenance
Acquired from the Academy of Medicine; source: Percy Skuy, Toronto, Ont.
Maker
The Medicophone Post-Graduate Co.
Site Made (City)
New York
Site Made (State)
New York
Site Made (Country)
United States of America
Dates
1908
1912
circa 1908-1912
Date Remarks
Manufacturer's dates for production of celluloid cylinders.
Material
ink: black
cardboard: light blue; beige; black
plastic: black
Inscriptions
Printed on outside of canister: "THE // U-S // Everlasting // RECORD"; "Greatest in volume, sweetest and purest in tone // Unbreakable and wears forever // THE // MEDICOPHONE POST- // GRADUATE CO. Sells this record upon the // express condition that it will // not be sold to any un- // authorized dealer, nor used // in making duplicates, and // that it shall not be sold or // offered for sale by any pur- // chaser thereof for less than // $1.00. Any breach of this // condition terminates the // licence to use and vend this record. // NOTICE: // This record will fit any // cylinder machine and can // be reproduced or played by // cylinder phonograph // that plays the ordinary four // minute musical record by // slowing down the speed of // machine to 80 revolutions // per minute."
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0007
0007-R2-3
Condition Remarks
#2: Shows wear around edges; plastic bag around cylinder adhered in several areas and bulks out the container.
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Internet
Reference Comments
On-line articles "Cylinder Preservation and Digitization Project - U.S. Everlasting Cylinders"; "Phonograph Cylinder"; CD #UHN
Research Facts
The phonograph was invented by Thomas Edison; he patented it on 18 July 1877 as the first device for recording and playing sound; his first attempt was using telephone messages; his first test used waxed paper. Early cylinder machines of the late 1880s and 1890s were often sold with recording attachments. The ability to record as well as to play back sound was an advantage to cylinder phonographs over the competition from cheaper disc phonographs that began to be mass-marketed at the end of the 1890s, as the disc system machines could be used only to play back pre-recorded sound. Edison Records closed down in 1929, and Thomas Edison died in 1931. In 1906, the Indestructable Record Company began mass-marketing cylinder records made of celluloid, an early hard plastic that would not break if dropped and could be played thousands of times without wearing out. This hard, inflexible material could not be shaved and recorded over like wax cylinders, but had the advantage of being a nearly perfect record. The U.S. Phonograph Company of Cleveland, Ohio, produced both two- and four-minute cylinders under its own label, "U.S. Everlasting Records," and under the Lakeside label for Montgomery Ward department stores. Between 1908 and 1912, more than 1,000 titles were released in three series: popular, foreign language, and grand opera. Like Edison, Blue Amberols, and indestructible cylinders, Everlasting cylinders were made of celluloid, but their sound quality is superior to either of them. The Medicophone Post-Graduate Co., a part of U.S. Everlasting Records, produced a series of recordings to provide professional medical advice on a variety of diseases and topics for physicians. Cylinder is noted as series title # X-206. In 1968, the celluloid cylinders were professionally recorded on magnetic tape by the Syracuse University Libraries Re-recording Laboratory. The complete series is stored on a master and duplicate reels. This title is found on reels 1977.11.41 and .45.
Images
Less detail

Diagnosis of Jaundice [celluloid phonograph cylinder]

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact7043
Dates
1908
1912
circa 1908-1912
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Education Artifacts
Classification
Education
Accession Number
1977.11.11 a-c
Description
Black celluloid phonograph cylinder in the original lidded blue cardboard container; lid and top edge of cylinder have the series number, title, and author's last name; holds four minutes of recorded information.
  1 image  
Accession Number
1977.11.11 a-c
Author
Dr. Henry A. Christian, Prof. Medicine
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Education Artifacts
Classification
Education
MeSH Heading
Teaching Materials
Audiovisual Aids
Education, Medical
Jaundice
Description
Black celluloid phonograph cylinder in the original lidded blue cardboard container; lid and top edge of cylinder have the series number, title, and author's last name; holds four minutes of recorded information.
Number Of Parts
3
Part Names
a - lid - Size: Depth 1.4 cm x Diam. 6.5 cm
b - container - Size: Length 11.0 cm x Diam. 6.0 cm
c - cylinder - Size: Length 10.0 cm x Diam. 5.6 cm
Provenance
Acquired from the Academy of Medicine; source: Percy Skuy, Toronto, Ont.
Maker
The Medicophone Post-Graduate Co.
Site Made (City)
New York
Site Made (State)
New York
Site Made (Country)
United States of America
Dates
1908
1912
circa 1908-1912
Date Remarks
Manufacturer's dates for production of celluloid cylinders.
Material
ink: black
cardboard: light blue; beige; black
plastic: black
Inscriptions
Printed on outside of canister: "THE // U-S // Everlasting // RECORD"; "Greatest in volume, sweetest and purest in tone // Unbreakable and wears forever // THE // MEDICOPHONE POST- // GRADUATE CO. Sells this record upon the // express condition that it will // not be sold to any un- // authorized dealer, nor used // in making duplicates, and // that it shall not be sold or // offered for sale by any pur- // chaser thereof for less than // $1.00. Any breach of this // condition terminates the // licence to use and vend this record. // NOTICE: // This record will fit any // cylinder machine and can // be reproduced or played by // cylinder phonograph // that plays the ordinary four // minute musical record by // slowing down the speed of // machine to 80 revolutions // per minute."
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0007
0007-R2-3
Condition Remarks
#2: Shows wear around edges; plastic bag around cylinder adhered in several areas and bulks out the container.
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Internet
Reference Comments
On-line articles "Cylinder Preservation and Digitization Project - U.S. Everlasting Cylinders"; "Phonograph Cylinder"; CD #UHN
Research Facts
The phonograph was invented by Thomas Edison; he patented it on 18 July 1877 as the first device for recording and playing sound; his first attempt was using telephone messages; his first test used waxed paper. Early cylinder machines of the late 1880s and 1890s were often sold with recording attachments. The ability to record as well as to play back sound was an advantage to cylinder phonographs over the competition from cheaper disc phonographs that began to be mass-marketed at the end of the 1890s, as the disc system machines could be used only to play back pre-recorded sound. Edison Records closed down in 1929, and Thomas Edison died in 1931. In 1906, the Indestructable Record Company began mass-marketing cylinder records made of celluloid, an early hard plastic that would not break if dropped and could be played thousands of times without wearing out. This hard, inflexible material could not be shaved and recorded over like wax cylinders, but had the advantage of being a nearly perfect record. The U.S. Phonograph Company of Cleveland, Ohio, produced both two- and four-minute cylinders under its own label, "U.S. Everlasting Records," and under the Lakeside label for Montgomery Ward department stores. Between 1908 and 1912, more than 1,000 titles were released in three series: popular, foreign language, and grand opera. Like Edison, Blue Amberols, and indestructible cylinders, Everlasting cylinders were made of celluloid, but their sound quality is superior to either of them. The Medicophone Post-Graduate Co., a part of U.S. Everlasting Records, produced a series of recordings to provide professional medical advice on a variety of diseases and topics for physicians. Cylinder is noted as series title # X-213. In 1968, the celluloid cylinders were professionally recorded on magnetic tape by the Syracuse University Libraries Re-recording Laboratory. The complete series is stored on a master and duplicate reels. This title is found on reels 1977.11.40 and .46.
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Diagnosis of Peritonitis [celluloid phonograph cylinder]

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact7049
Dates
1908
1912
circa 1908-1912
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Education Artifacts
Classification
Education
Accession Number
1977.11.17 a-c
Description
Black celluloid phonograph cylinder in the original lidded blue cardboard container; lid and top edge of cylinder have the series number, title, and author's last name; holds four minutes of recorded information.
  1 image  
Accession Number
1977.11.17 a-c
Author
Dr. Henry T. Byford, Prof. of Gynaecology
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Education Artifacts
Classification
Education
MeSH Heading
Teaching Materials
Audiovisual Aids
Education, Medical
Peritonitis
Description
Black celluloid phonograph cylinder in the original lidded blue cardboard container; lid and top edge of cylinder have the series number, title, and author's last name; holds four minutes of recorded information.
Number Of Parts
3
Part Names
a - lid - Size: Depth 1.4 cm x Diam. 6.5 cm
b - container - Size: Length 11.0 cm x Diam. 6.0 cm
c - cylinder - Size: Length 10.0 cm x Diam. 5.6 cm
Provenance
Acquired from the Academy of Medicine; source: Percy Skuy, Toronto, Ont.
Maker
The Medicophone Post-Graduate Co.
Site Made (City)
New York
Site Made (State)
New York
Site Made (Country)
United States of America
Dates
1908
1912
circa 1908-1912
Date Remarks
Manufacturer's dates for production of celluloid cylinders.
Material
ink: black
cardboard: light blue; beige; black
plastic: black
Inscriptions
Printed on outside of canister: "THE // U-S // Everlasting // RECORD"; "Greatest in volume, sweetest and purest in tone // Unbreakable and wears forever // THE // MEDICOPHONE POST- // GRADUATE CO. Sells this record upon the // express condition that it will // not be sold to any un- // authorized dealer, nor used // in making duplicates, and // that it shall not be sold or // offered for sale by any pur- // chaser thereof for less than // $1.00. Any breach of this // condition terminates the // licence to use and vend this record. // NOTICE: // This record will fit any // cylinder machine and can // be reproduced or played by // cylinder phonograph // that plays the ordinary four // minute musical record by // slowing down the speed of // machine to 80 revolutions // per minute."
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0007
0007-R2-3
Condition Remarks
#2: Shows wear around edges; plastic bag around cylinder adhered in several areas and bulks out the container.
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Internet
Reference Comments
On-line articles "Cylinder Preservation and Digitization Project - U.S. Everlasting Cylinders"; "Phonograph Cylinder"; CD #UHN
Research Facts
The phonograph was invented by Thomas Edison; he patented it on 18 July 1877 as the first device for recording and playing sound; his first attempt was using telephone messages; his first test used waxed paper. Early cylinder machines of the late 1880s and 1890s were often sold with recording attachments. The ability to record as well as to play back sound was an advantage to cylinder phonographs over the competition from cheaper disc phonographs that began to be mass-marketed at the end of the 1890s, as the disc system machines could be used only to play back pre-recorded sound. Edison Records closed down in 1929, and Thomas Edison died in 1931. In 1906, the Indestructable Record Company began mass-marketing cylinder records made of celluloid, an early hard plastic that would not break if dropped and could be played thousands of times without wearing out. This hard, inflexible material could not be shaved and recorded over like wax cylinders, but had the advantage of being a nearly perfect record. The U.S. Phonograph Company of Cleveland, Ohio, produced both two- and four-minute cylinders under its own label, "U.S. Everlasting Records," and under the Lakeside label for Montgomery Ward department stores. Between 1908 and 1912, more than 1,000 titles were released in three series: popular, foreign language, and grand opera. Like Edison, Blue Amberols, and indestructible cylinders, Everlasting cylinders were made of celluloid, but their sound quality is superior to either of them. The Medicophone Post-Graduate Co., a part of U.S. Everlasting Records, produced a series of recordings to provide professional medical advice on a variety of diseases and topics for physicians. Cylinder is noted as series title # X-222. In 1968, the celluloid cylinders were professionally recorded on magnetic tape by the Syracuse University Libraries Re-recording Laboratory. The complete series is stored on a master and duplicate reels. This title is found on reels 1977.11.42 and .47.
Images
Less detail

Diagnosis of Peritonitis Continued [celluloid phonograph cylinder]

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact7050
Dates
1908
1912
circa 1908-1912
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Education Artifacts
Classification
Education
Accession Number
1977.11.18 a-c
Description
Black celluloid phonograph cylinder in the original lidded blue cardboard container; lid and top edge of cylinder have the series number, title, and author's last name; holds four minutes of recorded information.
  1 image  
Accession Number
1977.11.18 a-c
Author
Dr. Henry T. Byford, Prof. of Gynaecology
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Education Artifacts
Classification
Education
MeSH Heading
Teaching Materials
Audiovisual Aids
Education, Medical
Peritonitis
Description
Black celluloid phonograph cylinder in the original lidded blue cardboard container; lid and top edge of cylinder have the series number, title, and author's last name; holds four minutes of recorded information.
Number Of Parts
3
Part Names
a - lid - Size: Depth 1.4 cm x Diam. 6.5 cm
b - container - Size: Length 11.0 cm x Diam. 6.0 cm
c - cylinder - Size: Length 10.0 cm x Diam. 5.6 cm
Provenance
Acquired from the Academy of Medicine; source: Percy Skuy, Toronto, Ont.
Maker
The Medicophone Post-Graduate Co.
Site Made (City)
New York
Site Made (State)
New York
Site Made (Country)
United States of America
Dates
1908
1912
circa 1908-1912
Date Remarks
Manufacturer's dates for production of celluloid cylinders.
Material
ink: black
cardboard: light blue; beige; black
plastic: black
Inscriptions
Printed on outside of canister: "THE // U-S // Everlasting // RECORD"; "Greatest in volume, sweetest and purest in tone // Unbreakable and wears forever // THE // MEDICOPHONE POST- // GRADUATE CO. Sells this record upon the // express condition that it will // not be sold to any un- // authorized dealer, nor used // in making duplicates, and // that it shall not be sold or // offered for sale by any pur- // chaser thereof for less than // $1.00. Any breach of this // condition terminates the // licence to use and vend this record. // NOTICE: // This record will fit any // cylinder machine and can // be reproduced or played by // cylinder phonograph // that plays the ordinary four // minute musical record by // slowing down the speed of // machine to 80 revolutions // per minute."
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0007
0007-R2-3
Condition Remarks
#2: Shows wear around edges; plastic bag around cylinder adhered in several areas and bulks out the container.
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Internet
Reference Comments
On-line articles "Cylinder Preservation and Digitization Project - U.S. Everlasting Cylinders"; "Phonograph Cylinder"; CD #UHN
Research Facts
The phonograph was invented by Thomas Edison; he patented it on 18 July 1877 as the first device for recording and playing sound; his first attempt was using telephone messages; his first test used waxed paper. Early cylinder machines of the late 1880s and 1890s were often sold with recording attachments. The ability to record as well as to play back sound was an advantage to cylinder phonographs over the competition from cheaper disc phonographs that began to be mass-marketed at the end of the 1890s, as the disc system machines could be used only to play back pre-recorded sound. Edison Records closed down in 1929, and Thomas Edison died in 1931. In 1906, the Indestructable Record Company began mass-marketing cylinder records made of celluloid, an early hard plastic that would not break if dropped and could be played thousands of times without wearing out. This hard, inflexible material could not be shaved and recorded over like wax cylinders, but had the advantage of being a nearly perfect record. The U.S. Phonograph Company of Cleveland, Ohio, produced both two- and four-minute cylinders under its own label, "U.S. Everlasting Records," and under the Lakeside label for Montgomery Ward department stores. Between 1908 and 1912, more than 1,000 titles were released in three series: popular, foreign language, and grand opera. Like Edison, Blue Amberols, and indestructible cylinders, Everlasting cylinders were made of celluloid, but their sound quality is superior to either of them. The Medicophone Post-Graduate Co., a part of U.S. Everlasting Records, produced a series of recordings to provide professional medical advice on a variety of diseases and topics for physicians. Cylinder is noted as series title # X-223. In 1968, the celluloid cylinders were professionally recorded on magnetic tape by the Syracuse University Libraries Re-recording Laboratory. The complete series is stored on a master and duplicate reels. This title is found on reels 1977.11.42 and .47.
Images
Less detail

Diagnosis of Rickets [celluloid phonograph cylinder]

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact7051
Dates
1908
1912
circa 1908-1912
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Education Artifacts
Classification
Education
Accession Number
1977.11.19 a-c
Description
Black celluloid phonograph cylinder in the original lidded blue cardboard container; lid and top edge of cylinder have the series number, title, and author's last name; holds four minutes of recorded information.
  1 image  
Accession Number
1977.11.19 a-c
Author
Dr. J.P. Crozier Griffith, Dept.of Paediatrics
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Education Artifacts
Classification
Education
MeSH Heading
Teaching Materials
Audiovisual Aids
Education, Medical
Ricketts
Description
Black celluloid phonograph cylinder in the original lidded blue cardboard container; lid and top edge of cylinder have the series number, title, and author's last name; holds four minutes of recorded information.
Number Of Parts
3
Part Names
a - lid - Size: Depth 1.4 cm x Diam. 6.5 cm
b - container - Size: Length 11.0 cm x Diam. 6.0 cm
c - cylinder - Size: Length 10.0 cm x Diam. 5.6 cm
Provenance
Acquired from the Academy of Medicine; source: Percy Skuy, Toronto, Ont.
Maker
The Medicophone Post-Graduate Co.
Site Made (City)
New York
Site Made (State)
New York
Site Made (Country)
United States of America
Dates
1908
1912
circa 1908-1912
Date Remarks
Manufacturer's dates for production of celluloid cylinders.
Material
ink: black
cardboard: light blue; beige; black
plastic: black
Inscriptions
Printed on outside of canister: "THE // U-S // Everlasting // RECORD"; "Greatest in volume, sweetest and purest in tone // Unbreakable and wears forever // THE // MEDICOPHONE POST- // GRADUATE CO. Sells this record upon the // express condition that it will // not be sold to any un- // authorized dealer, nor used // in making duplicates, and // that it shall not be sold or // offered for sale by any pur- // chaser thereof for less than // $1.00. Any breach of this // condition terminates the // licence to use and vend this record. // NOTICE: // This record will fit any // cylinder machine and can // be reproduced or played by // cylinder phonograph // that plays the ordinary four // minute musical record by // slowing down the speed of // machine to 80 revolutions // per minute."
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0007
0007-R2-3
Condition Remarks
#2: Shows wear around edges; plastic bag around cylinder adhered in several areas and bulks out the container.
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Internet
Reference Comments
On-line articles "Cylinder Preservation and Digitization Project - U.S. Everlasting Cylinders"; "Phonograph Cylinder"; CD #UHN
Research Facts
The phonograph was invented by Thomas Edison; he patented it on 18 July 1877 as the first device for recording and playing sound; his first attempt was using telephone messages; his first test used waxed paper. Early cylinder machines of the late 1880s and 1890s were often sold with recording attachments. The ability to record as well as to play back sound was an advantage to cylinder phonographs over the competition from cheaper disc phonographs that began to be mass-marketed at the end of the 1890s, as the disc system machines could be used only to play back pre-recorded sound. Edison Records closed down in 1929, and Thomas Edison died in 1931. In 1906, the Indestructable Record Company began mass-marketing cylinder records made of celluloid, an early hard plastic that would not break if dropped and could be played thousands of times without wearing out. This hard, inflexible material could not be shaved and recorded over like wax cylinders, but had the advantage of being a nearly perfect record. The U.S. Phonograph Company of Cleveland, Ohio, produced both two- and four-minute cylinders under its own label, "U.S. Everlasting Records," and under the Lakeside label for Montgomery Ward department stores. Between 1908 and 1912, more than 1,000 titles were released in three series: popular, foreign language, and grand opera. Like Edison, Blue Amberols, and indestructible cylinders, Everlasting cylinders were made of celluloid, but their sound quality is superior to either of them. The Medicophone Post-Graduate Co., a part of U.S. Everlasting Records, produced a series of recordings to provide professional medical advice on a variety of diseases and topics for physicians. Cylinder is noted as series title # X-218. In 1968, the celluloid cylinders were professionally recorded on magnetic tape by the Syracuse University Libraries Re-recording Laboratory. The complete series is stored on a master and duplicate reels. This title is found on reels 1977.11.42 and .47.
Images
Less detail

45 records – page 1 of 5.