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scultetus binder

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact8479
Dates
1950
1959
circa 1950-1959
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Diagnostic & Treatment Artifacts
Classification
Obstetrics
Accession Number
1988.1.1
Description
White cotton scultetus binder consisting of a rectangular piece of cloth cut into eight strips from the ends toward the centre, leaving a square area in the centre that is not torn.
  1 image  
Accession Number
1988.1.1
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Diagnostic & Treatment Artifacts
Classification
Obstetrics
MeSH Heading
Clothing
Textiles
Postpartum Period
Midwifery
Bandages
Description
White cotton scultetus binder consisting of a rectangular piece of cloth cut into eight strips from the ends toward the centre, leaving a square area in the centre that is not torn.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Acquired from the Academy of Medicine; source: Mrs. A. Quik of Montreal.
Maker
Mrs. A. Quik
Site Made (City)
Montreal
Site Made (State)
Quebec
Site Made (Country)
Canada
Dates
1950
1959
circa 1950-1959
Material
fabric: white
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0007
0007 Closet M
Dimension Notes
Length 1.23 m x Width 46.0 cm
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Person
Internet
JPG
Reference Comments
Mrs. A. Quik; "What is a Scultetus Binder?" at www.ehow.com/about 5164704 scultetus-binder.html; CD #UHN
Research Facts
Also called postpartum binder or many-tailed bandage or spider bandage; made by the donor from a pattern supplied by her midwife in Bovenkeck, Holland, for use after the birth of her children to restore the figure and keep the uterus in its correct position; the binder was worn by the new mother for 10 days after the birth and was changed daily; the midwife bound up the post-partum woman by wrapping the straight pieces over her belly and fastening the binder by braiding the strips down the front; Mrs. Quik made the binders in the seventh month of pregnancy; Mrs. Quik tried to demonstrate how the binder was fastened but was unable to remember how it was done; however, she said that the midwife, an elder, traditional woman, had made a very neat, attractive, braided closing.
Images
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scultetus binder

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact8480
Dates
1950
1959
circa 1950-1959
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Diagnostic & Treatment Artifacts
Classification
Obstetrics
Accession Number
1988.1.2
Description
Also called a postpartum binder, a many-tailed bandage, or a spider bandage; a square piece of cloth cut or torn into strips from the ends toward the centre, with as large a centre left as necessary to cover a compress on a wound; the ends are then tied with the tails overlapping each other or held…
  1 image  
Accession Number
1988.1.2
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Diagnostic & Treatment Artifacts
Classification
Obstetrics
MeSH Heading
Clothing
Textiles
Postpartum Period
Midwifery
Bandages
Description
Also called a postpartum binder, a many-tailed bandage, or a spider bandage; a square piece of cloth cut or torn into strips from the ends toward the centre, with as large a centre left as necessary to cover a compress on a wound; the ends are then tied with the tails overlapping each other or held in place by safety pins.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Acquired from the Academy of Medicine; source: Mrs. A. Quik of Montreal.
Maker
Mrs. A. Quik
Site Made (City)
Montreal
Site Made (State)
Quebec
Site Made (Country)
Canada
Dates
1950
1959
circa 1950-1959
Material
fabric: white
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0007
BOX 17
Dimension Notes
Length 1.19 m x Width 45 cm
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Person
Internet
JPG
Reference Comments
Mrs. A. Quik; "What is a Scultetus Binder?" at www.ehow.com/about 5164704 scultetus-binder.html; CD #UHN
Research Facts
Also called postpartum binder or many-tailed bandage or spider bandage; made by the donor from a pattern supplied by her midwife in Bovenkeck, Holland, for use after the birth of her children to restore the figure and keep the uterus in its correct position; the binder was worn by the new mother for 10 days after the birth and was changed daily; the midwife bound up the post-partum woman by wrapping the straight pieces over her belly and fastening the binder by braiding the strips down the front; Mrs. Quik made the binders in the seventh month of pregnancy; Mrs. Quik tried to demonstrate how the binder was fastened but was unable to remember how it was done; however, she said that the midwife, an elder, traditional woman, had made a very neat, attractive, braided closing.
Images
Less detail