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Collodion Flexible

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact15196
Dates
1954
1984
circa 1954 - 1984
Category
Pharmacy and Drug Artifacts
Classification
Pharmacy, General
Patient Care
Accession Number
019002002
Description
Circular semi-transparent brown glass bottle containing Shawinigan Collodion Flexible with non-removable cylindrical black plastic screw cap; two thirds full with clear liquid; cylindrical side walls; round shoulders, short cylindrical neck, flat neck ring, and cylindrical finish with external thre…
  5 images  
Accession Number
019002002
Category
Pharmacy and Drug Artifacts
Classification
Pharmacy, General
Patient Care
MeSH Heading
Wound Healing
Description
Circular semi-transparent brown glass bottle containing Shawinigan Collodion Flexible with non-removable cylindrical black plastic screw cap; two thirds full with clear liquid; cylindrical side walls; round shoulders, short cylindrical neck, flat neck ring, and cylindrical finish with external thread; mold lines on sides from base to top and around neck and base; basal stippling and embossed manufacturers information on bottom; cream and green paper label with product information and directions attached to front; black plastic cap has flat top, repeating series of vertical ridges on exterior sides and internal thread.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Belonged to donor; in use at Kingston Penitentiary, Kingston, Ontario Canada.
Maker
Shawinigan, The McArthur Chemical Co. LTD.
Site Made (City)
Montreal
Site Made (State)
Quebec
Site Made (Country)
Canada
Dates
1954
1984
circa 1954 - 1984
Date Remarks
Owens-Illinois Glass Company introduced the “I in O” logo in 1954; “14” code on bottom indicates bottle was manufactured at the Bridgeton, New Jersey factory, which operated from 1930 – 1984
Material
glass: brown
paper: cream
ink: green, black, red
plastic: black
Inscriptions
Printed on label: “1 LB. // SHAWINIGAN // 6621 // COLLODION FLEXIBLE // U. S. P. // ALCOHOL 23% -235 GRAINS ETHER PER FL. OZ. // For External Use Only // DANGER ! EXTREMELY FLAMMABLE // Keep away from heat, sparks, and open flame. // Keep container tightly closed. // DIRECTIONS – Brush directly over cleansed skin site needing // protection. May be used to hold small gauze dressings in place // by application around their edges. // CAUTION – Infection may be hastened or aggrevated by // sealing over broken skin. // E124073F3” // 1300 // DISTRIBUTED BY // THE MCARTHUR CHEMICAL CO. LTD. // MONTREAL // SHAWINIGAN”; embossed on bottom: “14 OI 4 // 5”
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-A5-2 Row B
Length
19.1 cm
Diameter
8.0 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Minor fading all over label; minor encrustation on proper right aide of label
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Website
Document
Reference Comments
“Flexible Collodion.” Medical Dictionary; The Free Dictionary, Farlex, 2019. Accessed 12 June 2019.
Lockhart, Bill and Russ Hoenig. “The Bewildering Array of Owens-Illinois Glass Co. Logos and Codes.” Society for Historical Archaeology, 2015.
Research Facts
Collodion is a solution of cellulose nitrate (pyroxylin), ether, and alcohol; the liquid becomes a thin film when dry; used to close small wounds, to hold dressings in place, and to keep medications in contact with skin; also a topical protectant when combined with camphor and castor oil.
Owens-Illinois Glass Company introduced its “I in O” logo in 1954 and it was used into 21st Century; “14” code on bottom indicates bottle was manufactured at the Bridgeton, New Jersey factory, which operated from 1930 – 1984; basal stippling was introduced in 1940s.
Kingston Penitentiary is a former maximum security prison located in Kingston, Ontario, Canada, between King Street West and Lake Ontario. Opened : June 1, 1835; Closed: 2013 Security class : Maximum security Capacity : 564; a national historic site.
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scultetus binder

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact8479
Dates
1950
1959
circa 1950-1959
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Diagnostic & Treatment Artifacts
Classification
Obstetrics
Accession Number
1988.1.1
Description
White cotton scultetus binder consisting of a rectangular piece of cloth cut into eight strips from the ends toward the centre, leaving a square area in the centre that is not torn.
  1 image  
Accession Number
1988.1.1
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Diagnostic & Treatment Artifacts
Classification
Obstetrics
MeSH Heading
Clothing
Textiles
Postpartum Period
Midwifery
Bandages
Description
White cotton scultetus binder consisting of a rectangular piece of cloth cut into eight strips from the ends toward the centre, leaving a square area in the centre that is not torn.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Acquired from the Academy of Medicine; source: Mrs. A. Quik of Montreal.
Maker
Mrs. A. Quik
Site Made (City)
Montreal
Site Made (State)
Quebec
Site Made (Country)
Canada
Dates
1950
1959
circa 1950-1959
Material
fabric: white
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0007
0007 Closet M
Dimension Notes
Length 1.23 m x Width 46.0 cm
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Person
Internet
JPG
Reference Comments
Mrs. A. Quik; "What is a Scultetus Binder?" at www.ehow.com/about 5164704 scultetus-binder.html; CD #UHN
Research Facts
Also called postpartum binder or many-tailed bandage or spider bandage; made by the donor from a pattern supplied by her midwife in Bovenkeck, Holland, for use after the birth of her children to restore the figure and keep the uterus in its correct position; the binder was worn by the new mother for 10 days after the birth and was changed daily; the midwife bound up the post-partum woman by wrapping the straight pieces over her belly and fastening the binder by braiding the strips down the front; Mrs. Quik made the binders in the seventh month of pregnancy; Mrs. Quik tried to demonstrate how the binder was fastened but was unable to remember how it was done; however, she said that the midwife, an elder, traditional woman, had made a very neat, attractive, braided closing.
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scultetus binder

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact8480
Dates
1950
1959
circa 1950-1959
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Diagnostic & Treatment Artifacts
Classification
Obstetrics
Accession Number
1988.1.2
Description
Also called a postpartum binder, a many-tailed bandage, or a spider bandage; a square piece of cloth cut or torn into strips from the ends toward the centre, with as large a centre left as necessary to cover a compress on a wound; the ends are then tied with the tails overlapping each other or held…
  1 image  
Accession Number
1988.1.2
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Diagnostic & Treatment Artifacts
Classification
Obstetrics
MeSH Heading
Clothing
Textiles
Postpartum Period
Midwifery
Bandages
Description
Also called a postpartum binder, a many-tailed bandage, or a spider bandage; a square piece of cloth cut or torn into strips from the ends toward the centre, with as large a centre left as necessary to cover a compress on a wound; the ends are then tied with the tails overlapping each other or held in place by safety pins.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Acquired from the Academy of Medicine; source: Mrs. A. Quik of Montreal.
Maker
Mrs. A. Quik
Site Made (City)
Montreal
Site Made (State)
Quebec
Site Made (Country)
Canada
Dates
1950
1959
circa 1950-1959
Material
fabric: white
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0007
BOX 17
Dimension Notes
Length 1.19 m x Width 45 cm
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Person
Internet
JPG
Reference Comments
Mrs. A. Quik; "What is a Scultetus Binder?" at www.ehow.com/about 5164704 scultetus-binder.html; CD #UHN
Research Facts
Also called postpartum binder or many-tailed bandage or spider bandage; made by the donor from a pattern supplied by her midwife in Bovenkeck, Holland, for use after the birth of her children to restore the figure and keep the uterus in its correct position; the binder was worn by the new mother for 10 days after the birth and was changed daily; the midwife bound up the post-partum woman by wrapping the straight pieces over her belly and fastening the binder by braiding the strips down the front; Mrs. Quik made the binders in the seventh month of pregnancy; Mrs. Quik tried to demonstrate how the binder was fastened but was unable to remember how it was done; however, she said that the midwife, an elder, traditional woman, had made a very neat, attractive, braided closing.
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Less detail