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infant feeding bottle

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact14441
Dates
1891
1910
circa 1891-1910
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Home Health Care
Classification
Patient Care
Nursing
Accession Number
016001059
Description
Purple tinged clear glass 'turtle' shaped infant feeding bottle with rounded bottom and angled neck for cork or rubber teat closure; visible mould line around edges; hand blown glass; front flat area with embossed product name; measurement gradations on front cork in valve opening with minor miss…
  1 image  
Accession Number
016001059
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Home Health Care
Classification
Patient Care
Nursing
MeSH Heading
Pediatrics
Infant Care
Infant Food
Nursing Care
Nursing Care -- instrumentation
Description
Purple tinged clear glass 'turtle' shaped infant feeding bottle with rounded bottom and angled neck for cork or rubber teat closure; visible mould line around edges; hand blown glass; front flat area with embossed product name; measurement gradations on front cork in valve opening with minor missing glass around edge.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and Alice Roeder.
Site Made (Country)
England
Dates
1891
1910
circa 1891-1910
Material
glass: transparent
Inscriptions
Embossed on feeder: "FLUID OUNCES // THE BEST // PAT. SEP 1. 91 // THE GOTHAM CO. N.Y."
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1
Length
17.5 cm
Width
9.0 cm
Depth
6.5 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Cork shows wear and missing minor amount; interior with minor residue
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Documents Book Internet
Reference Comments
Allison, Eileen Michael. Ceramic Invalid Feeders, Pap Boats, and Baby Bottles of the 19th & Twentieth Century. Canada: E. M. Allison, 1997.; American Collectors of Infant Feeders
Research Facts
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and sister Alice Roeder, a retired nurse. The collection consists of various eras and types of invalid / infant feeders, infant milk bottles, medicine spoons, urinals and reference material.
Names associated with this item include: baby bottle, nurser, infant nursing bottle, antique baby bottles, glass baby Bottles, milk bottles, Victorian, Victorian baby, Victorian baby feeding bottle
The design of glass baby feeding bottles from 1860-1900 were hard to clean due to the glass screw or cork closures and long rubber tubes ending with rubber teats. This bottle design allowed the infant to self-feed.
This innovation freed the mother from the hassle and discomfort of nursing and wearing a nursing corset, and allowed her the opportunity to tend to her other chores (this was particularly useful for those members of the middle to lower classes who needed to work). A contributing factor to the deadly growth of bacteria throughout the bottle design was that these bottles were not sterilized, only washed every two or three weeks.
This lack of sanitation allowed for deadly bacteria to flourish, and lead to doctors condemning the use of these bottles – now nicknamed ‘Murder Bottles’ – as they contributed to the high infant mortality rates of the late 1800s (only two out of ten babies would survived until two years of age).
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infant feeding bottle

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact14440
Dates
1880
1910
circa 1880-1910
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Home Health Care
Classification
Patient Care
Nursing
Accession Number
016001060 a-b
Description
Two piece clear glass 'turtle' shaped infant feeding bottle (a) with separate clear glass screw (b) with centre hole for rubber tube, tube missing; squared off bottom with angled neck threaded to receive screw closure; visible mould line around edges; hand blown glass; front flat area with embosse…
  1 image  
Accession Number
016001060 a-b
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Home Health Care
Classification
Patient Care
Nursing
MeSH Heading
Pediatrics
Infant Care
Infant Food
Nursing Care
Nursing Care -- instrumentation
Description
Two piece clear glass 'turtle' shaped infant feeding bottle (a) with separate clear glass screw (b) with centre hole for rubber tube, tube missing; squared off bottom with angled neck threaded to receive screw closure; visible mould line around edges; hand blown glass; front flat area with embossed product name.
Number Of Parts
2
Part Names
a - bottle
b - screw
Provenance
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and Alice Roeder.
Site Made (Country)
England
Dates
1880
1910
circa 1880-1910
Material
glass: transparent
Inscriptions
Embossed on feeder: "IMPROVED // FEEDING BOTTLE"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1
Length
a - 15.7 cm
b - 3.1 cm
Width
a - 10.0 cm
Depth
a - 7.5 cm
Diameter
b - 3.3 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Documents Book Internet
Reference Comments
Allison, Eileen Michael. Ceramic Invalid Feeders, Pap Boats, and Baby Bottles of the 19th & Twentieth Century. Canada: E. M. Allison, 1997.; American Collectors of Infant Feeders
Research Facts
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and sister Alice Roeder, a retired nurse. The collection consists of various eras and types of invalid / infant feeders, infant milk bottles, medicine spoons, urinals and reference material.
Names associated with this item include: baby bottle, nurser, infant nursing bottle, antique baby bottles, glass baby Bottles, milk bottles, Victorian, Victorian baby, Victorian baby feeding bottle
The design of glass baby feeding bottles from 1860-1900 were hard to clean due to the glass screw or cork closures and long rubber tubes ending with rubber teats. This bottle design allowed the infant to self-feed.
This innovation freed the mother from the hassle and discomfort of nursing and wearing a nursing corset, and allowed her the opportunity to tend to her other chores (this was particularly useful for those members of the middle to lower classes who needed to work). A contributing factor to the deadly growth of bacteria throughout the bottle design was that these bottles were not sterilized, only washed every two or three weeks.
This lack of sanitation allowed for deadly bacteria to flourish, and lead to doctors condemning the use of these bottles – now nicknamed ‘Murder Bottles’ – as they contributed to the high infant mortality rates of the late 1800s (only two out of ten babies would survived until two years of age).
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infant feeding bottle

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact14437
Dates
1880
1910
circa 1880-1910
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Home Health Care
Classification
Patient Care
Nursing
Accession Number
016001061 a-b
Description
Two piece clear glass 'turtle' shaped infant feeding bottle (a) with separate clear glass screw (b) with centre hole for rubber tube, tube missing; squared off bottom with angled neck threaded to receive screw; visible mould line around edges; embossed lines to indicate mesurements in tablespoons …
  2 images  
Accession Number
016001061 a-b
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Home Health Care
Classification
Patient Care
Nursing
MeSH Heading
Pediatrics
Infant Care
Infant Food
Nursing Care
Nursing Care -- instrumentation
Description
Two piece clear glass 'turtle' shaped infant feeding bottle (a) with separate clear glass screw (b) with centre hole for rubber tube, tube missing; squared off bottom with angled neck threaded to receive screw; visible mould line around edges; embossed lines to indicate mesurements in tablespoons up to 18; front flat area with circular embossed product name.
Number Of Parts
2
Part Names
a - bottle
b - screw
Provenance
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and Alice Roeder.
Site Made (Country)
England
Dates
1880
1910
circa 1880-1910
Material
glass: transparent
Inscriptions
Embossed on feeder: "THE PRINCESS OF WALES FEEDING BOTTLE // MADE IN ENGLAND // TABLESPOONS"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1
Length
a - 13.7 cm
b - 3.1 cm
Width
a - 10.0 cm
Depth
a - 7.5 cm
Diameter
b - 3.3 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Documents Book Internet
Reference Comments
Allison, Eileen Michael. Ceramic Invalid Feeders, Pap Boats, and Baby Bottles of the 19th & Twentieth Century. Canada: E. M. Allison, 1997.; American Collectors of Infant Feeders
Research Facts
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and sister Alice Roeder, a retired nurse. The collection consists of various eras and types of invalid / infant feeders, infant milk bottles, medicine spoons, urinals and reference material.
The design of glass baby feeding bottles from 1860-1900 were hard to clean due to the glass screw or cork closures and long rubber tubes ending with rubber teats. This bottle design allowed the infant to self-feed.
This innovation freed the mother from the hassle and discomfort of nursing and wearing a nursing corset, and allowed her the opportunity to tend to her other chores (this was particularly useful for those members of the middle to lower classes who needed to work). A contributing factor to the deadly growth of bacteria throughout the bottle design was that these bottles were not sterilized, only washed every two or three weeks.
This lack of sanitation allowed for deadly bacteria to flourish, and lead to doctors condemning the use of these bottles – now nicknamed ‘Murder Bottles’ – as they contributed to the high infant mortality rates of the late 1800s (only two out of ten babies would survived until two years of age).
Exhibit History
On display for exhibit "Gananoque 150" L-2017-6 at Arthur Child Heritage Museum; 24 April 2017 - 26 Aug 2017
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infant feeding bottle

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact14438
Dates
1945
1955
circa 1945-1955
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Home Health Care
Classification
Patient Care
Nursing
Accession Number
016001063 a-d
Description
Clear glass 'banana' style 'Grip-tight' infant feeder (a) with open ends for rubber teat (c) and rubber valve (d) at opposite ends in original product box (b); orange rubber valve and teat with stamped product name; box with drawing of naked infant on pillow and bottle sowing placement of teat and …
  1 image  
Accession Number
016001063 a-d
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Home Health Care
Classification
Patient Care
Nursing
MeSH Heading
Pediatrics
Infant Care
Infant Food
Nursing Care
Nursing Care -- instrumentation
Description
Clear glass 'banana' style 'Grip-tight' infant feeder (a) with open ends for rubber teat (c) and rubber valve (d) at opposite ends in original product box (b); orange rubber valve and teat with stamped product name; box with drawing of naked infant on pillow and bottle sowing placement of teat and valve includes instructions.
Number Of Parts
4
Part Names
a - bottle
b - box
c - rubber teat
d - ruber valve
Provenance
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and Alice Roeder.
Maker
Grip-tight
Site Made (Country)
England
Dates
1945
1955
circa 1945-1955
Material
glass: transparent
paper: white
ink: turquoise, ornage, yellow, black
rubber: tan
Inscriptions
Embossed on bottle: "Grip-tight"; printed on box: "Grip-tight / FEEDER // fluid ounces // HEAT STERILISING in the following way will not harm the bottle: place // the feeder in a saucepan of cold // water, which should then be boiled for about five minutes. // FEEDTEATS and VALVES // ARE EXCEPTIONALLY LONG LASTING // AWARDED DIPLOMA OF THE ROYAL INSTITUTE OF PUBLIC HEALTH AND HYGIENE // Atomspheric and other influences may effect the sizes and the functioning of the // feed hole in the teat and the air vent in the valve. // If the food does not flow satisfactorily, remove the valve periodically for a few moments to admit air, but if this is not effective enlarge the feed hole in the following way: // Fix the teat on a feeder which then place on a table; secure a cork on the eye end of a thin needle, the point of which should be then made red-hot; quickly and // carefully insert the red-hot point into the hole of the teat and withdraw promptly. // the bottle shoudl be kept steady and the right arm holding the needle should // be supported on some object of convenient height and size. // MADE IN ENGLAND // COMPLETE // WITH TEAT // AND VALVE"; printed on rubber items: "Grip-tight // MADE IN ENGLAND"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1
Length
a - 18.6 cm
b - 19.3 cm
c - 4.3 cm
d - 2.3 cm
Width
a - 7.8 cm
b - 7.0 cm
Depth
a - 5.6 cm
b - 7.0 cm
Diameter
c - 2.0 cm
d - 2.1 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Documents Book Internet
Reference Comments
Allison, Eileen Michael. Ceramic Invalid Feeders, Pap Boats, and Baby Bottles of the 19th & Twentieth Century. Canada: E. M. Allison, 1997.; American Collectors of Infant Feeders
Research Facts
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and sister Alice Roeder, a retired nurse. The collection consists of various eras and types of invalid / infant feeders, infant milk bottles, medicine spoons, urinals and reference material.
Names associated with this item include: baby bottle, nurser, infant nursing bottle, antique baby bottles, glass baby Bottles, milk bottles, Victorian, Victorian baby, Victorian baby feeding bottle
Though the ‘Murder Bottle’ design of early glass and rubber infant feeders were unsanitary was outlawed by Buffalo, New York by 1897, they continued to be bought and used widely into the 1920s. A new elongated baby bottle with openings on both end of the bottle was created in 1894 called the ‘Banana Bottle’ or ‘The Allenbury Feeder’ that was easier to clean. It has been referred to as a ‘saviour’ due to it being the most hygienic bottle design on the market at the time, and was used into the 1950s.
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Less detail
Dates
1915
1925
circa 1915-1925
Collection
Eleanor E. Anderson Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Nursing
Accession Number
000008004 a-d
Description
Circular cardboard box (c-d) containing two lead nipple shields (a-b) and two cotton pads; white box with small green and gold floral design; shields are separated by a cotton piece; shields are malleable lead disks with a concave shape.
  1 image  
Accession Number
000008004 a-d
Collection
Eleanor E. Anderson Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Nursing
MeSH Heading
Breast Feeding
MM= Breast Feeding -- nipple shield
Description
Circular cardboard box (c-d) containing two lead nipple shields (a-b) and two cotton pads; white box with small green and gold floral design; shields are separated by a cotton piece; shields are malleable lead disks with a concave shape.
Number Of Parts
4
Part Names
a-b - nipple sheild
c - box bottom
d - box lid
Provenance
Owned by Dr. and Mrs. Kidd of Ottawa, Ontario; Dr. Kidd graduated from Queen's University Faculty of Medicine Class of 1929; Mrs. Kidd graduated from the Ottawa Civic Hospital School of Nursing Class of 1925. Dr. John Franklin Kidd (1865-1932).
Maker
Dr. Wansborough
Site Made (Country)
England
Dates
1915
1925
circa 1915-1925
Date Remarks
Supply catalogue
Material
paper: white, pink
metal: grey
ink: black, green, yellow
Inscriptions
On each nipple sheild (a-b) engraved into the lead is "ENGLAND"; printed on bottom sticker: "FROM // Dr. WANSBOROUGH'S // Paper // Read before the Society of Arts."; (d) inside lid: "Directions" then a paragraph describing how to use the product; top lid label "Dr. WANSBROUGH'S // METALIC // NIPPLE SHEILDS // RECOMMENDED BY THE // Most Eminent Medical Men // For The Prevention // & Cure of // SORE NIPPLES"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D7-9
Depth
a-b - 0.9 cm
c - 2.5 cm
d - 1.3 cm
Diameter
a-b - 5.1 cm
c - 6.4 cm
d - 6.4 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
The lead on nipple shield (a) has white spots on the surface; the paper is beginning to peel off of both the box lid and bottom
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Book
Reference Comments
"Illustrated Catalog of a Complete Line of Standard Surgical Instruments," Codman & Shurtleff, Inc., ca. 1920, p. 320 (item number 9871)
Research Facts
Used on the nipples to prevent and cure soreness; a slight suction is created between the metal and the nipple when a little breast milk is excreted.
Exhibit History
To display in Museum: Potions, Pills and Prescriptions; May 1, 2000 - 28 Nov 2016
Images
Less detail
Dates
1950
circa 1950
Collection
Donna (Thompson) Tweddell Collection
Category
Pharmacy and Drug Artifacts
Classification
Pharmacy, Respiratory
Accession Number
006034001 a-b
Description
Mackenzie smelling salts bottle; brown glass bottle with a rectangular foot on the very bottom with a rounded shape in the middle (a) with a screw-on plastic lid (b); two paper labels are attached to the bottle; one to the front; the other to the back.
Accession Number
006034001 a-b
Collection
Donna (Thompson) Tweddell Collection
Category
Pharmacy and Drug Artifacts
Classification
Pharmacy, Respiratory
MeSH Heading
Hypersensitivity -- drug therapy
Common Cold -- drug therapy
Drugs, Non-Prescription
MM= Drug Packaging -- container -- bottle
Description
Mackenzie smelling salts bottle; brown glass bottle with a rectangular foot on the very bottom with a rounded shape in the middle (a) with a screw-on plastic lid (b); two paper labels are attached to the bottle; one to the front; the other to the back.
Number Of Parts
2
Part Names
a - glass bottle - Size: Length 5.2 cm x Width 4.2 cm x Depth 1.6 cm
b - screw-on lid - Size: Diam. 1.9 cm x Depth 1.2 cm
Provenance
Owned by Donna Tweddell.
Maker
Dr. Mackenzie's Laboratories
Site Made (City)
London
Site Made (Country)
England
Dates
1950
circa 1950
Date Remarks
Donor's remarks
Material
glass : brown
plastic : black
paper : black, cream
Inscriptions
On the bottom of the glass bottle "Z 159 // S 10", printed on the paper labels on the front of the bottle "MACKENZIE // for // the relief // of the symptoms // of catarrh. // SMELLING BOTTLE // Cold in the Head // Hay Fever Nervous Headache // and Faintness // HANDBAG SIZE" On the back of the bottle, printed on the paper label " ANTISEPTIC SOOTHING HEALING // Active // CONSTITUENTS // Dr. MACKENZIE'S // LABORATORIES LTD // LONDON // reg. v. 13622 // MADE IN ENGLAND"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-A4-6 Box 1 Row D
Condition Remarks
Like new
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Internet
Book
Reference Comments
Internet: "The Sensation Press," "Dorland's Illustrated Medical Dictionary," 25th ed., 1974, p. 1376
Research Facts
Smelling salts are made from ammonium carbonate; they are used as a stimulant and restorative.
Less detail

Zubes Cough Lozenges

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact2179
Collection
Dr. Michael A. Chiong Patent Medicine Collection
Category
Pharmacy and Drug Artifacts
Classification
Pharmacy, Respiratory
Accession Number
996001100
Description
Low circular metal container of cough lozenges; nothing in container; gold bottom with orange lid with black, gold and pink writing over surface; lid does not come off.
  1 image  
Accession Number
996001100
Collection
Dr. Michael A. Chiong Patent Medicine Collection
Category
Pharmacy and Drug Artifacts
Classification
Pharmacy, Respiratory
MeSH Heading
Cough -- drug therapy
Pharyngitis -- drug therapy
Antitussive Agents
Drugs, Non-Prescription
MM= Drug Packaging -- container -- tin
Description
Low circular metal container of cough lozenges; nothing in container; gold bottom with orange lid with black, gold and pink writing over surface; lid does not come off.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Acquired by Dr. M. Chiong for his patent medicine collection; purchased in Ottawa in June 1993.
Maker
E. W. Hampshire and Co.
Site Made (City)
Derby
Site Made (Country)
England
Material
metal: yellow; orange; black; pink
Inscriptions
"Soothing // and comforting // zubes // ... // Cough Lozenges // Pour le mal de gorge // 10 cents // Made in England by F. W. Hampshire and Company, Limited Derby"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-A
Dimension Notes
Length: 1.5 cm. x Diam. : 6.6 cm.
Condition Remarks
Some slight wear over surface
Copy Type
Original
Exhibit History
To display in Museum: Potions, Pills and Prescriptions; May 1, 2000 - 28 Jan 2017.
Images
Less detail

7 records – page 1 of 1.