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birth defects slide presentation

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact10788
Dates
1951
1972
Between 1951-1972
Collection
Dr. R. Wesley Boston Collection
Category
Education Artifacts
Classification
Education
Accession Number
004020001 a-bw
Description
A case of 35 mm slides; the case (a) is made up of a plastic base with a marble colouring, and a grey plastic lid; inside the lid is an unused card (b) with room for descriptions of each slide to be written; inside the case are x61 coloured slides showing pictures of newborn babies with various bir…
  5 images  
Accession Number
004020001 a-bw
Collection
Dr. R. Wesley Boston Collection
Category
Education Artifacts
Classification
Education
MeSH Heading
Neurology -- audiovisual aids
Audiovisual Aids
Description
A case of 35 mm slides; the case (a) is made up of a plastic base with a marble colouring, and a grey plastic lid; inside the lid is an unused card (b) with room for descriptions of each slide to be written; inside the case are x61 coloured slides showing pictures of newborn babies with various birth defects; these slides are labelled as follows "Tumour L. Forearm" (c-i), "mongol" (j), "mongoloid imbecile newborn" (k), "mongolian spots (l,m), "anencephaly" (n,o), "hydrocephalus newborn" (p,q), "hydrocephalus + meningo myelocoele" (r-t), "arthrogyrosis" (u), "baby decouto" (v-ac), "bilateral cong. dislocation of hips" (ad), "hypospadias + bifio scrotum" (ae-ah), "newborn with multiple cong. anomalies" (ai-an), "face presentation oedema" (ao), "bleeding from circumcision" (ap,aq), "treacher-collins syndrome" (ar-at), "extreme prematurity" (au,av), "feotal malnutrition" (aw,ax), "severe feotal malnutrition" (ay, az), "couling" (ba,bb), "microcephalic 1 1/2 lb." (bc), "phocomelia" (bd), "disphragmatic hernia thomas?" (be), "baby dcampos H.D.H." (bf), "infant of pre-diabetic mother + infant of same gestation" (bg), "cystic hygroma rsaxilla" (bh), "imperferated hymen" (bi), "purpura stewart" (bj), and "hydros foetails 28 wks" (bk); there are also x12 metal dividers (bw) which divide the slides by subject.
Number Of Parts
75
Part Names
a - case - Size: Length 23.0 cm x Width 12.7 cm x Depth 6.4 cm
b - card Size: Length 21.5 cm x Width 12.0 cm
c-bk - slides - Size: Length 5.0 cm x Width 5.0 cm x Depth 0.2 cm
bj-bw - dividers - Size: Length 5.3 cm x Width 5.1 cm x Depth 0.1 cm
Provenance
Used by a neurologist Dr. R. Wesley Boston at Kingston General Hospital.
Maker
Zephyr Doufile
Site Made (Country)
Sweden
Dates
1951
1972
Between 1951-1972
Date Remarks
The slides are dated with various dates between 1951 and 1972.
Material
plastic: marble, white, grey
metal: silver, black
Inscriptions
"ZEPHYR DOUFILE" printed on the top of the case; "MADE IN // SWEDEN" printed on the back of the slides
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-C8-4
Condition Remarks
There is one cracked slide
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Cambridge audio-visual heart sound recorder

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact6714
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Diagnostic & Treatment Artifacts
Classification
Cardiology
Accession Number
1975.12.1
Description
Wooden cabinet contains a 4-channel magnetic disk heart sound recorder with frequency accentuation, separate player and playback volume control, combined record volume patient monitor, and playback switch; input for two stethophones, one EKG, patient, R wave, cathode ray; 5 controls located above i…
  5 images  
Accession Number
1975.12.1
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Diagnostic & Treatment Artifacts
Classification
Cardiology
MeSH Heading
Heart Sounds
Auscultation -- instrumentation
Audiovisual Aids
Physical Examination
Description
Wooden cabinet contains a 4-channel magnetic disk heart sound recorder with frequency accentuation, separate player and playback volume control, combined record volume patient monitor, and playback switch; input for two stethophones, one EKG, patient, R wave, cathode ray; 5 controls located above input, inset at front of case; two boxes of tapes, some empty, and stethophone microphone.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Acquired from the Academy of Medicine; source: Dr. A. Graham, Dept. of Cardiology, Wellesley Hospital.
Maker
Cambridge
Site Made (Country)
United States of America
Material
wood: brown
metal: black
rubber
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0007
0007-J2-3
Dimension Notes
Length 35.5 cm x Width 26.0 cm x Depth 30.0 cm
Condition Remarks
Operable; very sensitive; stethophone needs rubber tubing replaced.
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Photo
JPG
Reference Comments
CD #UHN
Images
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Cardiac Stimulants [celluloid phonograph cylinder]

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact7068
Dates
1908
1912
circa 1908-1912
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Education Artifacts
Classification
Education
Accession Number
1977.11.34 a-c
Description
Black celluloid phonograph cylinder in the original lidded blue cardboard container; lid and top edge of cylinder have the series number, title, and author's last name; holds four minutes of recorded information.
  1 image  
Accession Number
1977.11.34 a-c
Author
Dr. H.C. Wood Junior, Prof. of Therapeutics
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Education Artifacts
Classification
Education
MeSH Heading
Teaching Materials
Audiovisual Aids
Education, Medical
Cardiology
Description
Black celluloid phonograph cylinder in the original lidded blue cardboard container; lid and top edge of cylinder have the series number, title, and author's last name; holds four minutes of recorded information.
Number Of Parts
3
Part Names
a - lid - Size: Depth 1.4 cm x Diam. 6.5 cm
b - container - Size: Length 11.0 cm x Diam. 6.0 cm
c - cylinder - Size: Length 10.0 cm x Diam. 5.6 cm
Provenance
Acquired from the Academy of Medicine; source: Percy Skuy, Toronto, Ont.
Maker
The Medicophone Post-Graduate Co.
Site Made (City)
New York
Site Made (State)
New York
Site Made (Country)
United States of America
Dates
1908
1912
circa 1908-1912
Date Remarks
Manufacturer's dates for production of celluloid cylinders.
Material
ink: black
cardboard: light blue; beige; black
plastic: black
Inscriptions
Printed on outside of canister: "THE // U-S // Everlasting // RECORD"; "Greatest in volume, sweetest and purest in tone // Unbreakable and wears forever // THE // MEDICOPHONE POST- // GRADUATE CO. Sells this record upon the // express condition that it will // not be sold to any un- // authorized dealer, nor used // in making duplicates, and // that it shall not be sold or // offered for sale by any pur- // chaser thereof for less than // $1.00. Any breach of this // condition terminates the // licence to use and vend this record. // NOTICE: // This record will fit any // cylinder machine and can // be reproduced or played by // cylinder phonograph // that plays the ordinary four // minute musical record by // slowing down the speed of // machine to 80 revolutions // per minute."
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0007
0007-R2-3
Condition Remarks
#2: Shows wear around edges; plastic bag around cylinder adhered in several areas and bulks out the container.
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Internet
Reference Comments
On-line articles "Cylinder Preservation and Digitization Project - U.S. Everlasting Cylinders"; "Phonograph Cylinder"; CD #UHN
Research Facts
The phonograph was invented by Thomas Edison; he patented it on 18 July 1877 as the first device for recording and playing sound; his first attempt was using telephone messages; his first test used waxed paper. Early cylinder machines of the late 1880s and 1890s were often sold with recording attachments. The ability to record as well as to play back sound was an advantage to cylinder phonographs over the competition from cheaper disc phonographs that began to be mass-marketed at the end of the 1890s, as the disc system machines could be used only to play back pre-recorded sound. Edison Records closed down in 1929, and Thomas Edison died in 1931. In 1906, the Indestructable Record Company began mass-marketing cylinder records made of celluloid, an early hard plastic that would not break if dropped and could be played thousands of times without wearing out. This hard, inflexible material could not be shaved and recorded over like wax cylinders, but had the advantage of being a nearly perfect record. The U.S. Phonograph Company of Cleveland, Ohio, produced both two- and four-minute cylinders under its own label, "U.S. Everlasting Records," and under the Lakeside label for Montgomery Ward department stores. Between 1908 and 1912, more than 1,000 titles were released in three series: popular, foreign language, and grand opera. Like Edison, Blue Amberols, and indestructible cylinders, Everlasting cylinders were made of celluloid, but their sound quality is superior to either of them. The Medicophone Post-Graduate Co., a part of U.S. Everlasting Records, produced a series of recordings to provide professional medical advice on a variety of diseases and topics for physicians. Cylinder is noted as series title # X-256. In 1968, the celluloid cylinders were professionally recorded on magnetic tape by the Syracuse University Libraries Re-recording Laboratory. The complete series is stored on a master and duplicate reels. This title is found on reels 1977.11.44 and .48.
Images
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Cardiac Stimulants Continued -- Strophanthus, Aconite, Vertrum [celluloid phonograph cylinder]

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact7069
Dates
1908
1912
circa 1908-1912
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Education Artifacts
Classification
Education
Accession Number
1977.11.35 a-c
Description
Black celluloid phonograph cylinder in the original lidded blue cardboard container; lid and top edge of cylinder have the series number, title, and author's last name; holds four minutes of recorded information.
  1 image  
Accession Number
1977.11.35 a-c
Author
Dr. H.C. Wood Junior, Prof. of Therapeutics
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Education Artifacts
Classification
Education
MeSH Heading
Teaching Materials
Audiovisual Aids
Education, Medical
Cardiology
Description
Black celluloid phonograph cylinder in the original lidded blue cardboard container; lid and top edge of cylinder have the series number, title, and author's last name; holds four minutes of recorded information.
Number Of Parts
3
Part Names
a - lid - Size: Depth 1.4 cm x Diam. 6.5 cm
b - container - Size: Length 11.0 cm x Diam. 6.0 cm
c - cylinder - Size: Length 10.0 cm x Diam. 5.6 cm
Provenance
Acquired from the Academy of Medicine; source: Percy Skuy, Toronto, Ont.
Maker
The Medicophone Post-Graduate Co.
Site Made (City)
New York
Site Made (State)
New York
Site Made (Country)
United States of America
Dates
1908
1912
circa 1908-1912
Date Remarks
Manufacturer's dates for production of celluloid cylinders.
Material
ink: black
cardboard: light blue; beige; black
plastic: black
Inscriptions
Printed on outside of canister: "THE // U-S // Everlasting // RECORD"; "Greatest in volume, sweetest and purest in tone // Unbreakable and wears forever // THE // MEDICOPHONE POST- // GRADUATE CO. Sells this record upon the // express condition that it will // not be sold to any un- // authorized dealer, nor used // in making duplicates, and // that it shall not be sold or // offered for sale by any pur- // chaser thereof for less than // $1.00. Any breach of this // condition terminates the // licence to use and vend this record. // NOTICE: // This record will fit any // cylinder machine and can // be reproduced or played by // cylinder phonograph // that plays the ordinary four // minute musical record by // slowing down the speed of // machine to 80 revolutions // per minute."
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0007
0007-R2-3
Condition Remarks
#2: Shows wear around edges; plastic bag around cylinder adhered in several areas and bulks out the container.
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Internet
Reference Comments
On-line articles "Cylinder Preservation and Digitization Project - U.S. Everlasting Cylinders"; "Phonograph Cylinder"; CD #UHN
Research Facts
The phonograph was invented by Thomas Edison; he patented it on 18 July 1877 as the first device for recording and playing sound; his first attempt was using telephone messages; his first test used waxed paper. Early cylinder machines of the late 1880s and 1890s were often sold with recording attachments. The ability to record as well as to play back sound was an advantage to cylinder phonographs over the competition from cheaper disc phonographs that began to be mass-marketed at the end of the 1890s, as the disc system machines could be used only to play back pre-recorded sound. Edison Records closed down in 1929, and Thomas Edison died in 1931. In 1906, the Indestructable Record Company began mass-marketing cylinder records made of celluloid, an early hard plastic that would not break if dropped and could be played thousands of times without wearing out. This hard, inflexible material could not be shaved and recorded over like wax cylinders, but had the advantage of being a nearly perfect record. The U.S. Phonograph Company of Cleveland, Ohio, produced both two- and four-minute cylinders under its own label, "U.S. Everlasting Records," and under the Lakeside label for Montgomery Ward department stores. Between 1908 and 1912, more than 1,000 titles were released in three series: popular, foreign language, and grand opera. Like Edison, Blue Amberols, and indestructible cylinders, Everlasting cylinders were made of celluloid, but their sound quality is superior to either of them. The Medicophone Post-Graduate Co., a part of U.S. Everlasting Records, produced a series of recordings to provide professional medical advice on a variety of diseases and topics for physicians. Cylinder is noted as series title # X-259. In 1968, the celluloid cylinders were professionally recorded on magnetic tape by the Syracuse University Libraries Re-recording Laboratory. The complete series is stored on a master and duplicate reels. This title is found on reels 1977.11.44 and .48.
Images
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celluloid cylinder phonograph

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact7041
Dates
1910
circa 1910
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Education Artifacts
Classification
Education
Accession Number
1977.11.1
Description
Wooden tabletop-style Edison cylinder phonograph with built-in speaker and hinged top; operated by hand crank.
  1 image  
Accession Number
1977.11.1
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Education Artifacts
Classification
Education
MeSH Heading
Teaching Materials
Audiovisual Aids
Education, Medical
Description
Wooden tabletop-style Edison cylinder phonograph with built-in speaker and hinged top; operated by hand crank.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Acquired from the Academy of Medicine; source: Percy Skuy, Toronto, Ont.
Maker
Edison Records
Site Made (Country)
United States of America
Dates
1910
circa 1910
Material
wood: brown; black
metal: silver; black
fabric: yellow
Inscriptions
Label inside: "Edison"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0007
0007-R2-3
Dimension Notes
Length 40.0cm x Width 31.5 cm x Depth 31.0 cm
Condition Remarks
#2: Front edge of case has minor lift of veneer; speaker screen fabric dusty.
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Internet
Reference Comments
"Phonograph Cylinder," Wikipedia
Research Facts
The phonograph was invented by Thomas Edison; he patented it on 18 July 1877 as the first device for recording and playing sound; his first attempt was using telephone messages; his first test used waxed paper. Early cylinder machines of the late 1880s and 1890s were often sold with recording attachments. The ability to record as well as to play back sound was an advantage to cylinder phonographs over the competition from cheaper disc phonographs that began to be mass-marketed at the end of the 1890s, as the disc system machines could be used only to play back pre-recorded sound. Edison Records closed down in 1929, and Thomas Edison died in 1931. Accompanying this record player were 38 wax cylinders with lectures covering a variety of medical subjects.
Images
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dental stereoscopic photographs with viewer

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact13204
Dates
1900
1920
circa 1900-1920
Collection
Dr. Ralph and Mrs. Olga Crawford Canadian Dental Collection
Category
Education Artifacts
Classification
Education
Accession Number
010020115 a-d
Description
Set of dental stereoscopic photographs with stereoscopic viewer; viewer (a) consists of two square pieces of brown wood with round clear glass inserts in middle; wood pieces have curved cut-out sections at inside edges so viewer can be placed on nose; wooden pieces attached at top to two black meta…
  2 images  
Accession Number
010020115 a-d
Collection
Dr. Ralph and Mrs. Olga Crawford Canadian Dental Collection
Category
Education Artifacts
Classification
Education
MeSH Heading
Teaching Materials
Audiovisual Aids
Education, Dental
Dentistry -- history
Description
Set of dental stereoscopic photographs with stereoscopic viewer; viewer (a) consists of two square pieces of brown wood with round clear glass inserts in middle; wood pieces have curved cut-out sections at inside edges so viewer can be placed on nose; wooden pieces attached at top to two black metal strips via silver metal screws; two black and white square photographs with curved tops glued to rectangular pink cardboard (b) feature large woman pulling on a long string attached to the tooth of a young boy, who is lying on a kitchen floor with his mouth open and one leg braced in an upside down chair; rectangular piece of beige cardboard (c) has a photograph printed twice on front featuring a man reclined in a dentist's chair, spittoon beside him, foot drill visible to his right, with a dentist performing a procedure on one of his teeth; two black and white square photographs glued to rectangular beige cardboard (d) feature a man with a pipe in his mouth administering gas to a man reclining on a chair in what looks to be a dentist's office; a younger man stands in the centre of the photograph holding a glass bottle and smiling.
Number Of Parts
4
Part Names
a - viewer - Size: Length 12.0 cm x Width 5.4 cm x Depth 1.5 cm
b - photograph - Size: Length 17.9 cm x Width 8.8 cm x Depth 0.1 cm
c - photograph - Size: Length 17.6 cm x Width 8.8 cm x Depth 0.1 cm
d - photograph - Size: Length 17.7 cm x Width 8.7 cm x Depth 0.1 cm
Provenance
Transfer from the Dental Canada Fund; previously housed in the Dentistry Canada Museum (Ottawa)
Site Made (Country)
United States of America
Dates
1900
1920
circa 1900-1920
Date Remarks
Printed on artefact
Material
wood: brown
paper: beige, pink
plastic: white, black
ink: black
glass: clear
metal: black, silver
Inscriptions
(b) Printed on front: "JAMES M. DAVIS, New York City, St. Louis, Mo. // 11933 Domestic dentistry // Copyright 1897 by B. W. Kilburn."; printed on back: "Photographed and Published by // B.W. Kilburn, = Littleton, N.H.,"; (c) printed on front: "Comic and Children Series // No. 42. Oh! What a Tooth!"; (d) printed on photograph: "76 Giving Gas."
Permanent Location
(a): Storage Room 0010
0010-B
(b, c, d): Storage Room 2005
2005-2-5 Box 21
Condition Remarks
Edges worn on photographs; (b, d) are curled; fold mark at top right corner of (c)
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
JPG
Reference Comments
CD #9
Research Facts
Dr Ralph and Mrs Olga Crawford donated their extensive Canadian dental collection to the DCF to create the museum in 1997; further donations were received while Dr Crawford was Curator Emeritus at the Dental Canada Museum until its closure in 2008
Images
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Diagnosis and Treatment of Acute and Chronic Mastitis [celluloid phonograph cylinder]

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact7052
Dates
1908
1912
circa 1908-1912
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Education Artifacts
Classification
Education
Accession Number
1977.11.2 a-c
Description
Black celluloid phonograph cylinder in the original lidded blue cardboard container; lid and top edge of cylinder have the series number, title, and author's last name; holds four minutes of recorded information.
  1 image  
Accession Number
1977.11.2 a-c
Author
Dr. W. L. Rodman, Prof. of Surgery
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Education Artifacts
Classification
Education
MeSH Heading
Teaching Materials
Audiovisual Aids
Education, Medical
Mastitis
Description
Black celluloid phonograph cylinder in the original lidded blue cardboard container; lid and top edge of cylinder have the series number, title, and author's last name; holds four minutes of recorded information.
Number Of Parts
3
Part Names
a - lid - Size: Depth 1.4 cm x Diam. 6.5 cm
b - container - Size: Length 11.0 cm x Diam. 6.0 cm
c - cylinder - Size: Length 10.0 cm x Diam. 5.6 cm
Provenance
Acquired from the Academy of Medicine; source: Percy Skuy, Toronto, Ont.
Maker
The Medicophone Post-Graduate Co.
Site Made (City)
New York
Site Made (State)
New York
Site Made (Country)
United States of America
Dates
1908
1912
circa 1908-1912
Date Remarks
Manufacturer's dates for production of celluloid cylinders.
Material
ink: black
cardboard: light blue; beige; black
plastic: black
Inscriptions
Printed on outside of canister: "THE // U-S // Everlasting // RECORD"; "Greatest in volume, sweetest and purest in tone // Unbreakable and wears forever // THE // MEDICOPHONE POST- // GRADUATE CO. Sells this record upon the // express condition that it will // not be sold to any un- // authorized dealer, nor used // in making duplicates, and // that it shall not be sold or // offered for sale by any pur- // chaser thereof for less than // $1.00. Any breach of this // condition terminates the // licence to use and vend this record. // NOTICE: // This record will fit any // cylinder machine and can // be reproduced or played by // cylinder phonograph // that plays the ordinary four // minute musical record by // slowing down the speed of // machine to 80 revolutions // per minute."
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0007
0007-R2-3
Condition Remarks
#2: Shows wear around edges; plastic bag around cylinder adhered in several areas and bulks out the container.
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Internet
Reference Comments
On-line articles "Cylinder Preservation and Digitization Project - U.S. Everlasting Cylinders"; "Phonograph Cylinder"; CD #UHN
Research Facts
The phonograph was invented by Thomas Edison; he patented it on 18 July 1877 as the first device for recording and playing sound; his first attempt was using telephone messages; his first test used waxed paper. Early cylinder machines of the late 1880s and 1890s were often sold with recording attachments. The ability to record as well as to play back sound was an advantage to cylinder phonographs over the competition from cheaper disc phonographs that began to be mass-marketed at the end of the 1890s, as the disc system machines could be used only to play back pre-recorded sound. Edison Records closed down in 1929, and Thomas Edison died in 1931. In 1906, the Indestructable Record Company began mass-marketing cylinder records made of celluloid, an early hard plastic that would not break if dropped and could be played thousands of times without wearing out. This hard, inflexible material could not be shaved and recorded over like wax cylinders, but had the advantage of being a nearly perfect record. The U.S. Phonograph Company of Cleveland, Ohio, produced both two- and four-minute cylinders under its own label, "U.S. Everlasting Records," and under the Lakeside label for Montgomery Ward department stores. Between 1908 and 1912, more than 1,000 titles were released in three series: popular, foreign language, and grand opera. Like Edison, Blue Amberols, and indestructible cylinders, Everlasting cylinders were made of celluloid, but their sound quality is superior to either of them. The Medicophone Post-Graduate Co., a part of U.S. Everlasting Records, produced a series of recordings to provide professional medical advice on a variety of diseases and topics for physicians. Cylinder is noted as series title # X-204. In 1968, the celluloid cylinders were professionally recorded on magnetic tape by the Syracuse University Libraries Re-recording Laboratory. The complete series is stored on a master and duplicate reels. This title is found on reels 1977.11.41 and .45.
Images
Less detail

Diagnosis & Management of Normal Pregnancy & the Subjective Signs of Pregnancy [celluloid phonograph cylinder]

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact7048
Dates
1908
1912
circa 1908-1912
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Education Artifacts
Classification
Education
Accession Number
1977.11.16 a-c
Description
Black celluloid phonograph cylinder in the original lidded blue cardboard container; lid and top edge of cylinder have the series number, title, and author's last name; holds four minutes of recorded information.
  1 image  
Accession Number
1977.11.16 a-c
Author
Dr. Barton Cook Hirst, Prof. of Obstetrics
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Education Artifacts
Classification
Education
MeSH Heading
Teaching Materials
Audiovisual Aids
Education, Medical
Obstetrics
Description
Black celluloid phonograph cylinder in the original lidded blue cardboard container; lid and top edge of cylinder have the series number, title, and author's last name; holds four minutes of recorded information.
Number Of Parts
3
Part Names
a - lid - Size: Depth 1.4 cm x Diam. 6.5 cm
b - container - Size: Length 11.0 cm x Diam. 6.0 cm
c - cylinder - Size: Length 10.0 cm x Diam. 5.6 cm
Provenance
Acquired from the Academy of Medicine; source: Percy Skuy, Toronto, Ont.
Maker
The Medicophone Post-Graduate Co.
Site Made (City)
New York
Site Made (State)
New York
Site Made (Country)
United States of America
Dates
1908
1912
circa 1908-1912
Date Remarks
Manufacturer's dates for production of celluloid cylinders.
Material
ink: black
cardboard: light blue; beige; black
plastic: black
Inscriptions
Printed on outside of canister: "THE // U-S // Everlasting // RECORD"; "Greatest in volume, sweetest and purest in tone // Unbreakable and wears forever // THE // MEDICOPHONE POST- // GRADUATE CO. Sells this record upon the // express condition that it will // not be sold to any un- // authorized dealer, nor used // in making duplicates, and // that it shall not be sold or // offered for sale by any pur- // chaser thereof for less than // $1.00. Any breach of this // condition terminates the // licence to use and vend this record. // NOTICE: // This record will fit any // cylinder machine and can // be reproduced or played by // cylinder phonograph // that plays the ordinary four // minute musical record by // slowing down the speed of // machine to 80 revolutions // per minute."
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0007
0007-R2-3
Condition Remarks
#2: Shows wear around edges; plastic bag around cylinder adhered in several areas and bulks out the container.
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Internet
Reference Comments
On-line articles "Cylinder Preservation and Digitization Project - U.S. Everlasting Cylinders"; "Phonograph Cylinder"; CD #UHN
Research Facts
The phonograph was invented by Thomas Edison; he patented it on 18 July 1877 as the first device for recording and playing sound; his first attempt was using telephone messages; his first test used waxed paper. Early cylinder machines of the late 1880s and 1890s were often sold with recording attachments. The ability to record as well as to play back sound was an advantage to cylinder phonographs over the competition from cheaper disc phonographs that began to be mass-marketed at the end of the 1890s, as the disc system machines could be used only to play back pre-recorded sound. Edison Records closed down in 1929, and Thomas Edison died in 1931. In 1906, the Indestructable Record Company began mass-marketing cylinder records made of celluloid, an early hard plastic that would not break if dropped and could be played thousands of times without wearing out. This hard, inflexible material could not be shaved and recorded over like wax cylinders, but had the advantage of being a nearly perfect record. The U.S. Phonograph Company of Cleveland, Ohio, produced both two- and four-minute cylinders under its own label, "U.S. Everlasting Records," and under the Lakeside label for Montgomery Ward department stores. Between 1908 and 1912, more than 1,000 titles were released in three series: popular, foreign language, and grand opera. Like Edison, Blue Amberols, and indestructible cylinders, Everlasting cylinders were made of celluloid, but their sound quality is superior to either of them. The Medicophone Post-Graduate Co., a part of U.S. Everlasting Records, produced a series of recordings to provide professional medical advice on a variety of diseases and topics for physicians. Cylinder is noted as series title # X-221. In 1968, the celluloid cylinders were professionally recorded on magnetic tape by the Syracuse University Libraries Re-recording Laboratory. The complete series is stored on a master and duplicate reels. This title is found on reels 1977.11.40 and .46.
Images
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Diagnosis of Cancer of the Mammary Gland [celluloid phonograph cylinder]

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact7074
Dates
1908
1912
circa 1908-1912
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Education Artifacts
Classification
Education
Accession Number
1977.11.4 a-c
Description
Black celluloid phonograph cylinder in the original lidded blue cardboard container; lid and top edge of cylinder have the series number, title, and author's last name; holds four minutes of recorded information.
  1 image  
Accession Number
1977.11.4 a-c
Author
Dr. W.L. Rodman, Prof. of Surgery
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Education Artifacts
Classification
Education
MeSH Heading
Teaching Materials
Audiovisual Aids
Education, Medical
Breast Neoplasms
Description
Black celluloid phonograph cylinder in the original lidded blue cardboard container; lid and top edge of cylinder have the series number, title, and author's last name; holds four minutes of recorded information.
Number Of Parts
3
Part Names
a - lid - Size: Depth 1.4 cm x Diam. 6.5 cm
b - container - Size: Length 11.0 cm x Diam. 6.0 cm
c - cylinder - Size: Length 10.0 cm x Diam. 5.6 cm
Provenance
Acquired from the Academy of Medicine; source: Percy Skuy, Toronto, Ont.
Maker
The Medicophone Post-Graduate Co.
Site Made (City)
New York
Site Made (State)
New York
Site Made (Country)
United States of America
Dates
1908
1912
circa 1908-1912
Date Remarks
Manufacturer's dates for production of celluloid cylinders.
Material
ink: black
cardboard: light blue; beige; black
plastic: black
Inscriptions
Printed on outside of canister: "THE // U-S // Everlasting // RECORD"; "Greatest in volume, sweetest and purest in tone // Unbreakable and wears forever // THE // MEDICOPHONE POST- // GRADUATE CO. Sells this record upon the // express condition that it will // not be sold to any un- // authorized dealer, nor used // in making duplicates, and // that it shall not be sold or // offered for sale by any pur- // chaser thereof for less than // $1.00. Any breach of this // condition terminates the // licence to use and vend this record. // NOTICE: // This record will fit any // cylinder machine and can // be reproduced or played by // cylinder phonograph // that plays the ordinary four // minute musical record by // slowing down the speed of // machine to 80 revolutions // per minute."
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0007
0007-R2-3
Condition Remarks
#2: Shows wear around edges; plastic bag around cylinder adhered in several areas and bulks out the container.
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Internet
Reference Comments
On-line articles "Cylinder Preservation and Digitization Project - U.S. Everlasting Cylinders"; "Phonograph Cylinder"; CD #UHN
Research Facts
The phonograph was invented by Thomas Edison; he patented it on 18 July 1877 as the first device for recording and playing sound; his first attempt was using telephone messages; his first test used waxed paper. Early cylinder machines of the late 1880s and 1890s were often sold with recording attachments. The ability to record as well as to play back sound was an advantage to cylinder phonographs over the competition from cheaper disc phonographs that began to be mass-marketed at the end of the 1890s, as the disc system machines could be used only to play back pre-recorded sound. Edison Records closed down in 1929, and Thomas Edison died in 1931. In 1906, the Indestructable Record Company began mass-marketing cylinder records made of celluloid, an early hard plastic that would not break if dropped and could be played thousands of times without wearing out. This hard, inflexible material could not be shaved and recorded over like wax cylinders, but had the advantage of being a nearly perfect record. The U.S. Phonograph Company of Cleveland, Ohio, produced both two- and four-minute cylinders under its own label, "U.S. Everlasting Records," and under the Lakeside label for Montgomery Ward department stores. Between 1908 and 1912, more than 1,000 titles were released in three series: popular, foreign language, and grand opera. Like Edison, Blue Amberols, and indestructible cylinders, Everlasting cylinders were made of celluloid, but their sound quality is superior to either of them. The Medicophone Post-Graduate Co., a part of U.S. Everlasting Records, produced a series of recordings to provide professional medical advice on a variety of diseases and topics for physicians. Cylinder is noted as series title # X-206. In 1968, the celluloid cylinders were professionally recorded on magnetic tape by the Syracuse University Libraries Re-recording Laboratory. The complete series is stored on a master and duplicate reels. This title is found on reels 1977.11.41 and .45.
Images
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Diagnosis of Jaundice [celluloid phonograph cylinder]

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact7043
Dates
1908
1912
circa 1908-1912
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Education Artifacts
Classification
Education
Accession Number
1977.11.11 a-c
Description
Black celluloid phonograph cylinder in the original lidded blue cardboard container; lid and top edge of cylinder have the series number, title, and author's last name; holds four minutes of recorded information.
  1 image  
Accession Number
1977.11.11 a-c
Author
Dr. Henry A. Christian, Prof. Medicine
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Education Artifacts
Classification
Education
MeSH Heading
Teaching Materials
Audiovisual Aids
Education, Medical
Jaundice
Description
Black celluloid phonograph cylinder in the original lidded blue cardboard container; lid and top edge of cylinder have the series number, title, and author's last name; holds four minutes of recorded information.
Number Of Parts
3
Part Names
a - lid - Size: Depth 1.4 cm x Diam. 6.5 cm
b - container - Size: Length 11.0 cm x Diam. 6.0 cm
c - cylinder - Size: Length 10.0 cm x Diam. 5.6 cm
Provenance
Acquired from the Academy of Medicine; source: Percy Skuy, Toronto, Ont.
Maker
The Medicophone Post-Graduate Co.
Site Made (City)
New York
Site Made (State)
New York
Site Made (Country)
United States of America
Dates
1908
1912
circa 1908-1912
Date Remarks
Manufacturer's dates for production of celluloid cylinders.
Material
ink: black
cardboard: light blue; beige; black
plastic: black
Inscriptions
Printed on outside of canister: "THE // U-S // Everlasting // RECORD"; "Greatest in volume, sweetest and purest in tone // Unbreakable and wears forever // THE // MEDICOPHONE POST- // GRADUATE CO. Sells this record upon the // express condition that it will // not be sold to any un- // authorized dealer, nor used // in making duplicates, and // that it shall not be sold or // offered for sale by any pur- // chaser thereof for less than // $1.00. Any breach of this // condition terminates the // licence to use and vend this record. // NOTICE: // This record will fit any // cylinder machine and can // be reproduced or played by // cylinder phonograph // that plays the ordinary four // minute musical record by // slowing down the speed of // machine to 80 revolutions // per minute."
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0007
0007-R2-3
Condition Remarks
#2: Shows wear around edges; plastic bag around cylinder adhered in several areas and bulks out the container.
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Internet
Reference Comments
On-line articles "Cylinder Preservation and Digitization Project - U.S. Everlasting Cylinders"; "Phonograph Cylinder"; CD #UHN
Research Facts
The phonograph was invented by Thomas Edison; he patented it on 18 July 1877 as the first device for recording and playing sound; his first attempt was using telephone messages; his first test used waxed paper. Early cylinder machines of the late 1880s and 1890s were often sold with recording attachments. The ability to record as well as to play back sound was an advantage to cylinder phonographs over the competition from cheaper disc phonographs that began to be mass-marketed at the end of the 1890s, as the disc system machines could be used only to play back pre-recorded sound. Edison Records closed down in 1929, and Thomas Edison died in 1931. In 1906, the Indestructable Record Company began mass-marketing cylinder records made of celluloid, an early hard plastic that would not break if dropped and could be played thousands of times without wearing out. This hard, inflexible material could not be shaved and recorded over like wax cylinders, but had the advantage of being a nearly perfect record. The U.S. Phonograph Company of Cleveland, Ohio, produced both two- and four-minute cylinders under its own label, "U.S. Everlasting Records," and under the Lakeside label for Montgomery Ward department stores. Between 1908 and 1912, more than 1,000 titles were released in three series: popular, foreign language, and grand opera. Like Edison, Blue Amberols, and indestructible cylinders, Everlasting cylinders were made of celluloid, but their sound quality is superior to either of them. The Medicophone Post-Graduate Co., a part of U.S. Everlasting Records, produced a series of recordings to provide professional medical advice on a variety of diseases and topics for physicians. Cylinder is noted as series title # X-213. In 1968, the celluloid cylinders were professionally recorded on magnetic tape by the Syracuse University Libraries Re-recording Laboratory. The complete series is stored on a master and duplicate reels. This title is found on reels 1977.11.40 and .46.
Images
Less detail

56 records – page 1 of 6.