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feminine spray douche

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact15219
Dates
1943
1986
circa 1943-1986
Collection
Tumak Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Hygiene
Classification
Home Health
Hygiene
Gynaecology
Accession Number
015011015 a-e
Description
Cardboard box (a) with hinged lid, held in place when open by a fabric string attaching the box to the lid; the lid and box are wrapped on the outside in yellow paper; on the top and front and side there is the product name printed in black inside a pink circle, with a black line stretching from th…
  5 images  
Accession Number
015011015 a-e
Collection
Tumak Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Hygiene
Classification
Home Health
Hygiene
Gynaecology
MeSH Heading
Gynaecology
Feminine Hygiene Products
Hygiene
Hygiene -- instrumentation
Description
Cardboard box (a) with hinged lid, held in place when open by a fabric string attaching the box to the lid; the lid and box are wrapped on the outside in yellow paper; on the top and front and side there is the product name printed in black inside a pink circle, with a black line stretching from the bottom of the circle to the right edge of the box with white print inside the line; this same logo is on the left side of the box, and there is handwriting on the side of the lid above it, as well as manufacturing and quantity information printed in black on the same side; inside the box lid is also covered in yellow paper with the same logo on it, and above the logo is the Rexall logo in white on a black background, and to the right is an illustration of the product and its parts and how they fit together, along with instructions on how to store them; inside the box is a cardboard cut-out coloured gold which is the shape of the bulb; the bulb (b) fits inside this shape and is made of rubber, with black on the bottom and white on the top; it has a flat bottom and widens in the middle before becoming rounded at the top, with a protrusion at the very top which contains the hole into which the pipe (c) can be screwed on; the pipe has two sets of threading on the end and is made of rubber; the other end of the pipe is slightly bulbous and has a hole in the end; stored under the cardboard cutout in the box is a metal spoon (d) shaped like a ladle with a hooked end and the product name and patent information engraved on the handle; also in the box is a small piece of paper with blue print (e) detailing the directions for the use of the product.
Number Of Parts
5
Part Names
a - box: Length 17.4 cm x Width 11.2 cm X Height 7.9 cm
b - bulb: Length 12.6 cm X Diameter 7.7 cm
c - pipe: Length 13.3 cm X Diameter 2.3 cm
d - spoon: Length 10.0 cm X Width 3.5 cm X Height 3.3 cm
e - instructions: Length 10.6 cm X Width 7.5 cm
Provenance
Belonged to donor
Maker
Rexall Drug Company
Site Made (City)
Los Angeles, Boston, St. Louis
Site Made (State)
California, Massachusetts, Missouri
Site Made (Country)
U.S.A.
Dates
1943
1986
circa 1943-1986
Date Remarks
Date based on when Rexall became Rexall Drug Company and when the St. Louis plant closed
Material
paper: tan
ink: yellow, pink, white, black, blue, gold
rubber: black, tan
metal: grey
fabric: cream
Inscriptions
Printed on top of box: "Hy·da·way // SWIRL SPRAY DOUCHE // PAT. PENDING"; handwritten on edge of left side of lid: "KORN // 3 95"; printed on left side of box: "Hy·da·way // R 303 // 8 OZ. // SWIRL SPRAY DOUCHE // PAT. PENDING // REXALL DRUG COMPANY · DISTRIBUTO // LOS ANGELES · BOSTON · ST. LOUIS · TORONTO, CANADA"; printed on inside of box lid: "Rexall // The Hy-Da-Way Swirl Spray Douche is con- // venient for traveling (pipe can be concealed // inside bulb and sealed with cap) and per- // fect for home use. Before using, remove // pipe from inside bulb and fit into assembled // position shown above. // MADE IN U.S.A. // Hy·da·way // Sanitary leakproof cap // After using, clean, // drain, reverse pipe in // bulb as indicated; then // screw cap on tightly. // SWIRL SPRAY DOUCHE // PAT. PENDING"; embossed on spoon: "Cream Top. // PAT. // SEPT. 2ND 1924 // MAR. 3RD 1925"; printed on instructions sheet: "DIRECTIONS FOR USE // Compress bulb as much as possible and submerge in solution // to be used. Release the bulb slowly. Lift the douche out // of solution, holding it upright, and then press gently on the // bulb until liquid appears at tip of pipe. Then, without re- // leasing the pressure, submerge pipe again, then release // bulb slowly. This should fill the bulb completely. // CAUTION: The user is warned against the use of undue pressure // on the bulb which might result in spreading infection. // Moderate pressure of the solution is sufficient for cleans- // ing. Withdraw nozzle and fluid will flush out quickly. // Greater effectiveness may result if used when reclining. // SP 474 // PRINTED IN U. S. A.".
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D8-10
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Box has a strong smell; rubber bulb hardened and discoloured; some bubbling in paper on box; paper instructions minorly crumpled around top left corner.
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Websites, book
Reference Comments
https://timeline.com/sexist-history-douching-bcc39f3d216c
https://www.motherjones.com/media/2012/03/when-women-used-lysol-birth-control/
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/21724/21724-h/21724-h.htm
https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/11644980
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/lysols-vintage-ads-subtly-pushed-women-to-use-its-disinfectant-as-birth-control-218734/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/mrbill/albums/834100/with/37387729/
http://magic.msu.edu/search~S39?/cHQ766%20.S32%201917%20Online/chq%20%20766%20s32%201917%20online/-3,-1,0,B/frameset&FF=chq%20%20766%20s32%201917%20online&1,1,
https://inews.co.uk/opinion/comment/a-brief-history-of-vaginal-douching-and-women-cleaning-themselves-with-disinfectants/
http://www.freepatentsonline.com/2664893.html
https://web.archive.org/web/20151030025534/http://capnrexall.blogspot.com/2011/06/rexall-history-short-version.html
Justia Trademarks, Hy-Da-Way: https://trademarks.justia.com/720/70/hy-da-way-72070946.html
Chapter 2a, Dating Milk Bottles, © Bill Lockhart 2011; page 15, "Cream-Top Milk Bottles: oterochap2a.pdf
Research Facts
This object was used for vaginal douching, a historically common practice of women's hygiene until recently. Today, doctors do not recommend douching as the vagina is self-cleaning and attempting to clean it with soaps and chemicals could be harmful to its pH balance and cause damage.
Beginning in the early 20th century, women would often use Lysol, a household disinfectant, as a douche. Lysol advertised this purpose, claiming that it would guard against odors (believed to be a euphemism for birth control).
Before 1911, there were a reported 193 poisonings and five deaths from Lysol douching, and women often complained of burning and blisters. In 1952, Lysol's formula was changed from cresol to become a quarter as toxic as before. The Lysol used in homes today is not the same as the one historically used for douching, and is no longer owned by the same company.
Advertisements for Lysol as a feminine hygiene product often targeted women's insecurities about their bodies and caused them to feel badly about them and feel the need to use a douche to remain clean and fresh. Lines used in different 20th century Lysol advertisements include: "Often a wife fails to realize that doubts due to one intimate neglect shut her out from happy married love", "Day after heartbreaking day I was held in [...] a web spun by my husband's indifference. [...] Was the fault mine?", "No woman who has a normal foundation of good health can be forgiven for failing to "stay young with her husband.""
The douche was the most popular “contraceptive” in the USA by 1940. In 1933, nearly half of a study of 507 women who used Lysol as a contraceptive became pregnant.
This particular douche design was invented by George P. Kempel and was made to be able to be disposed after one use according to its patent.
Hy-da-way was trademarked by Rexall in 1959 in relation to their Folding Fountain Syringe; another douche-like product.
The Cream Top spoon found with this object was created by Herbert E. Hill for Cream-Top milk bottles, which were bottles with a bulbous top where the cream could rise to and remain; the spoon was created in order to block the opening of the bottle below the bulbous part and prevent milk from escaping when the cream was poured out. It may possibly be present in this douche kit to be used for measuring the cleansing solution.
The cap is missing from this object, but is illustrated inside the lid.
Images
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The Rhythm of Sterility and Fertility in Women 4th Revised Edition [book]

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact15215
Dates
1934
circa 1934
Collection
Tumak Collection
Category
Archival Items
Education Artifacts
Classification
Archival, Publications
Education
Gynaecology
Literature
Accession Number
015011003
Description
Small hard cover book with black vinyl covers and a sewn binding; tan pages with black print; title "The Rhythm" is printed in the top centre of the front cover in gold in capital letters with three straight horizontal lines under it and a pointed line going up, then down through the straight lines…
Accession Number
015011003
Author
Leo J. Latz, A.B., M.D., LL.D.
Collection
Tumak Collection
Category
Archival Items
Education Artifacts
Classification
Archival, Publications
Education
Gynaecology
Literature
MeSH Heading
Archival
Education, Medical
Books
Menstrual Cycle
Menstruation
Sex Counseling
Contraception
Description
Small hard cover book with black vinyl covers and a sewn binding; tan pages with black print; title "The Rhythm" is printed in the top centre of the front cover in gold in capital letters with three straight horizontal lines under it and a pointed line going up, then down through the straight lines; on the first page there is a blue stamp for the library from which the book came; the book is divided into three parts (physiological, practical, and ethical aspects) and seventy five chapters, dealing with sex, sterility, fertility, marriage, pregnancy, female sexual organs, menstruation and the menstrual cycle, contraception, natural birth control, and contraception in relation to religion and God; the copyright page reads that the book was published with "Ecclesiastical Approbation"; on the last page, a portion of an envelope has been glued in and is open at the top; 128 pages.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Belonged to donor.
Maker
Latz Foundation
Site Made (City)
Chicago
Site Made (State)
Illinois
Site Made (Country)
U.S.A.
Dates
1934
circa 1934
Date Remarks
Copyright Date
Material
paper: tan
vinyl: black
ink: black, gold, blue
Inscriptions
Printed on front cover: "THE RHYTHM // LEO J. LATZ, M. D."; stamped on first page: "BIBLIOTHEQUE PROVINCIALE // 430 CHEMIN MONTREAL // OTTAWA 7, ONTARIO"; printed on title page: "THE RHYTHM // of // Sterility and Fertility // in Women // A Discussion of the Physiological, Practical, // and Ethical Aspects of the Discoveries // of Drs. K. Ogino (Japan) and H. // Knaus (Austria) Regarding // the Periods when Con- // ception Is Impos- // sible and when // Possible // by // Leo J. Latz, A.B., M.D., LL.D. // Member of the Staffs of Loyola // University Medical School, Alexian // Brothers' Hospital and St. Elizabeth Hospital. // Fourth Revised Edition // Sixtieth Thousand // Published by // LATZ FOUNDATION // (Corporation Not for Profit) // REPUBLIC BUILDING // CHICAGO, ILLINOIS".
Permanent Location
Storage Room 2005
2005-3
Length
10.7 cm
Width
1.5 cm
Height
15.6 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Sticker residue near bottom of spine and covers, vinyl coming off in top right corner of front cover and bottom of back cover.
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Websites
Reference Comments
"Leo J. Latz and "The Rhythm"", DIttrick Museum, March 16, 2010: http://dittrick.blogspot.com/2010/03/leo-j-latz-and-rhythm.html
"Highlights of the Percy Skuy History of Contraception Gallery: Rhythm Method", Case Western Reserve University: https://case.edu/affil/skuyhistcontraception/online-2012/Rhythm-method.html
"Book, ‘The rhythm of sterility and fertility in women’ by Leo J. Latz.", Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences: https://collection.maas.museum/object/345735
"Dr. Leo Latz dies, was originator of 'rhythm method'", Chicago Tribune, The Baltimore Sun, May 4, 1994: https://www.baltimoresun.com/news/bs-xpm-1994-05-04-1994124154-story.html
Research Facts
Dr. Leo J. Latz was one of the pioneers of the "rhythm" method of birth control, now often called natural family planning. The Rhythm method asserts that women are only fertile for five or six days of their menstrual cycle, and so it is unlikely for a woman to get pregnant outside of those days, even without material methods of birth control. His book went through twenty-six editions.
The Rhythm Method is the only method of birth control which received the official approval of the Catholic Church, having been approved by Pope Pius XII in 1951. In 1955, a survey of Catholic women found that over 65% of the women surveyed said they used the Rhythm method.
In 1934, Latz, a devout Catholic, was fired from his position at Loyola University, most likely over his involvment with the cause of Rhythm.
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