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Am-o-Tone Dry Shampoo

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact8006
Dates
1800
1899
1800-1899
Accession Number
1980.18.79
Description
Beige paper packet containing a dry shampoo.
  1 image  
Accession Number
1980.18.79
MeSH Heading
Household Products
Hygiene
Hair Preparations
Description
Beige paper packet containing a dry shampoo.
Number Of Parts
1
Maker
The Am-O-Tone Company
Dates
1800
1899
1800-1899
Material
paper: beige; blue
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-A2-5 Row F
Images
Less detail

At what age should a girl be told about menstruation? [booklet]

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact15077
Dates
1961
1964
circa 1961-1964
Collection
Anita Brunet Lamarche Collection
Category
Archival Items
Classification
Archival, Publications
Education
Accession Number
016012010 a-b
Description
A black and white booklet (a) about a school program on menstruation used at Franklin School, La Crosse, Wisconsin; the booklet is bound by two staples; mentions the Walt Disney film "The Story of Menstruation" and permission form parents to allow the film in the schools; inside of the booklet is a…
  3 images  
Accession Number
016012010 a-b
Author
Marion Jones, R.N.
Collection
Anita Brunet Lamarche Collection
Category
Archival Items
Classification
Archival, Publications
Education
MeSH Heading
Menstruation
Archival
Hygiene
Description
A black and white booklet (a) about a school program on menstruation used at Franklin School, La Crosse, Wisconsin; the booklet is bound by two staples; mentions the Walt Disney film "The Story of Menstruation" and permission form parents to allow the film in the schools; inside of the booklet is a notice (b) on a loose piece of paper provides an address for any requests in Canada; 7 pages.
Number Of Parts
2
Part Names
a - booklet
b - insert
Provenance
Collection belonged to the donor.
Maker
Kimberly-Clark Corporation
Site Made (City)
Toronto
Site Made (State)
Ontario
Site Made (Country)
Canada
Dates
1961
1964
circa 1961-1964
Material
paper: cream
ink: black, grey
Inscriptions
On the front: "at what age // should a girl be told about // menstruation? // A wise principal ... a sound // school program ... close // mother-daughter relations // answer this question // By Marion Jones, R.N., Educational Director // Kimberly-Clark Corporation, Neenah, Wisconsin"; on the insert (b): "NOTICE // Please address all requests in Canada // to: // EDUCATIONAL DEPARTMENT, // KIMBERLY-CLARK CANADA LIMITED, // 2 CARLTON STREET, // TORONTO 2, Ontario."; "Approval of Parents"; "Film Shown to Mothers // Answering Questions"; "Mother-and-Daughter Meetings // Program Gains Confidence"; "Successful 1957 Meeting // Wholesome Attitude"; "The Right Plan" "The Story of Menstruation" by Walt Disney Productions // Available to all schools, P.T.A. and Mother's Groups'
Permanent Location
Storage Room 2005
2005-2-5 Box 23
Length
24.8 cm
Width
17.8 cm
Depth
0.1 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
The bottom corners of the booklet are slightly bent upwards
Copy Type
original
Exhibit History
On loan to THEMUSEUM for exhibit 'Menstration' L-2019-1 12 Feb - 12 June 2019; returned to storage 8 June 2019
Images
Less detail
Dates
1920
1930
circa 1920-1930
Collection
Dr. R. Gordon Sinclair Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Hygiene
Pediatrics
Classification
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Bedpan
Home Health Care
Accession Number
002017002
Description
A small pink cup-shaped style enameled bedpan known as a "baby potty," with a round handle on one side.
  1 image  
Accession Number
002017002
Collection
Dr. R. Gordon Sinclair Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Hygiene
Pediatrics
Classification
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Bedpan
Home Health Care
MeSH Heading
Hygiene
Pediatrics
Sanitation
Toilet Facilities
Description
A small pink cup-shaped style enameled bedpan known as a "baby potty," with a round handle on one side.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Belonged to Dr. R. Gordon Sinclair.
Dates
1920
1930
circa 1920-1930
Date Remarks
Based on appearance and colour
Material
metal: pink
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0007
0007-N1-2
Temporary Location
On display "Doctor's Treatment Room c1930" at Museum of Health Care 20 Feb 2016.
Length
16.5 cm
Width
15.0 cm
Depth
7.5 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Dimension Notes
Length 16.5 cm x Width 15.0 cm x Depth 7.5 cm
Condition Remarks
Several large chips and cracks in the enamel coating of object, especially at the edges; some water marks and corrosion on chips inside object.
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Website
Reference Comments
Brownstoner, "From Pakistan to Brooklyn: A Quick History of the Bathroom," by Suzanne Spellen, https://www.brownstoner.com/architecture/victorian-bathroom-history-plumbing-brooklyn-architecture-interiors/.
Research Facts
By the 1920s, bathrooms were becoming more colourful and decorative than they had been in the Victorian era.
Images
Less detail
Dates
1900
1930
circa 1900-1930
Collection
Kingston General Hospital School of Nursing Alumnae Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Hygiene
Classification
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Bedpan
Home Health Care
Accession Number
995002026
Description
Off-white ceramic oval bedpan with circular spout at the top back.
  1 image  
Accession Number
995002026
Collection
Kingston General Hospital School of Nursing Alumnae Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Hygiene
Classification
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Bedpan
Home Health Care
MeSH Heading
Toilet Facilities
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Description
Off-white ceramic oval bedpan with circular spout at the top back.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Ruth Wallace, Kingston General Hospital School of Nursing class of 1931.
Dates
1900
1930
circa 1900-1930
Material
ceramic: off-white
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0007
0007-N1-3
Length
40.0 cm
Width
23.0 cm
Depth
11.0 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Dimension Notes
Length: 40.0 cm. x Width: 23.0 cm. x Depth: 11.0 cm.
Condition Remarks
Shows little wear; some staining; small chips on spout and 2 cracks (1.25 and 1.0); hairline crack (1.0); base shows evidence of wear on the edges
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Person
Website
Article
Reference Comments
American Association for the History of Nursing, https://www.aahn.org/bedpans#:~:text=Porcelain%2C%20china%2C%20and%20even%20pottery,enamel%20and%20then%20stainless%20steel.&text=Today%20these%20antique%20bedpans%20are,be%20found%20in%20antique%20stores.
Cassandra Good, “The Strange Saga of George Washington’s Bedpan,” August 20th, 2015. Smithsonian Magazine. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/strange-saga-george-washingtons-bedpan-180956347/
Barb (Earl) Gilbert, Kingston General Hospital Nursing School graduate class of 1963, and daughter of Ruth Wallace.
Research Facts
Before the late nineteenth century, bedpans and similar objects were made of metals such as pewter, brass, and sometimes even glass. By the late nineteenth century, porcelain, china, and pottery were used. As the 20th century dawned, bedpans, urinals, basins, etc. were made of enamel and later stainless steel. In the 1960s, there was a shift towards plastics and other disposables.
The bedpan was designed for people who could not or should not rise from their beds to relieve themselves. A bedpan could be lightly heated and placed under the covers of the beds of the elderly, people who were ill, and women recovering from childbirth so that they would not have to get out of bed. They were routinely emptied by caregivers, nurses, etc.
This bedpan style is a "slipper" type, later referred to as a fracture bedpan and can be slipped under the patient. The spout is to facilitate washing it out. Fracture bedpans are smaller than standard size bedpans, and have one flat end. This bedpan style is designed specifically for patients who are bedridden and have limited movement to use a standard style bedpan.
Images
Less detail
Dates
1905
1930
circa 1905-1930
Collection
Kingston General Hospital School of Nursing Alumnae Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Hygiene
Classification
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Bedpan
Home Health Care
Accession Number
995002027
Description
White enameled oval bedpan with blue-lined edges.
  1 image  
Accession Number
995002027
Collection
Kingston General Hospital School of Nursing Alumnae Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Hygiene
Classification
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Bedpan
Home Health Care
MeSH Heading
Toilet Facilities
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Description
White enameled oval bedpan with blue-lined edges.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Ruth Wallace, graduate of Kingston General Hospital School of Nursing class of 1931.
Dates
1905
1930
circa 1905-1930
Material
metal:
enamel: off-white; blue
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0007
0007-N1-4
Temporary Location
On display "Doctor's Treatment Room c1930" at Museum of Health Care 20 Feb 2016.
Length
36.0 cm
Width
29.0 cm
Depth
7.0 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Dimension Notes
Length: 36.0 cm. x Width: 29.0 cm. x Depth: 7.0 cm.
Condition Remarks
Shows negligible wear; slightly scratched at bottom front
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Person
Website
Article
Reference Comments
American Association for the History of Nursing, https://www.aahn.org/bedpans#:~:text=Porcelain%2C%20china%2C%20and%20even%20pottery,enamel%20and%20then%20stainless%20steel.&text=Today%20these%20antique%20bedpans%20are,be%20found%20in%20antique%20stores.
Cassandra Good, “The Strange Saga of George Washington’s Bedpan,” August 20th, 2015. Smithsonian Magazine. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/strange-saga-george-washingtons-bedpan-180956347/
Barb (Earl) Gilbert, graduate of Kingston General Hospital School of Nursing class of 1963 and daughter of Ruth Wallace
Research Facts
Before the late nineteenth century, bedpans and similar objects were made of metals such as pewter, brass, and sometimes even glass. By the late nineteenth century, porcelain, china, and pottery were used. As the 20th century dawned, bedpans, urinals, basins, etc. were made of enamel and later stainless steel. In the 1960s, there was a shift towards plastics and other disposables.
The bedpan was designed for people who could not or should not rise from their beds to relieve themselves. A bedpan could be lightly heated and placed under the covers of the beds of the elderly, people who were ill, and women recovering from childbirth so that they would not have to get out of bed. They were routinely emptied by caregivers, nurses, etc.
Images
Less detail
Dates
1900
1930
circa 1900-1930
Collection
Kingston General Hospital School of Nursing Alumnae Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Hygiene
Classification
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Bedpan
Home Health Care
Accession Number
995002107 a-b
Description
Slipper-shaped, hollow enamel bedpan (a), rounded at front and tapering at the back with a closed, squared end; open cylindrical spout at front; round opening on top that is covered with (b) a lid, which is round with a knob on top; lip on inside of lid.
  2 images  
Accession Number
995002107 a-b
Collection
Kingston General Hospital School of Nursing Alumnae Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Hygiene
Classification
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Bedpan
Home Health Care
MeSH Heading
Toilet Facilities
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Bedpan
Description
Slipper-shaped, hollow enamel bedpan (a), rounded at front and tapering at the back with a closed, squared end; open cylindrical spout at front; round opening on top that is covered with (b) a lid, which is round with a knob on top; lip on inside of lid.
Number Of Parts
2
Part Names
a - bedpan - Size: Length 47.5 cm x Width 30.5 cm x Depth 10.6 cm
b - lid - Size: Depth 4.8 cm x Diam. 20.8 cm
Provenance
Owned by Noreen Leishman, graduate of the Kingston General Hospital School of Nursing, class of 1950, belonged to "Pokey," a relative; apparently also a relative of Marg Polk.
Site Made (Country)
Austria
Dates
1900
1930
circa 1900-1930
Material
metal: dark grey, brown
enamel: dark grey, light grey
Inscriptions
Stamped in bottom: "AUSTRIA"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0007
0007-N1-1
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Enamel chipped at edges and metal shows some inactive corrosion.
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Book
Website
Article
Reference Comments
American Association for the History of Nursing, https://www.aahn.org/bedpans#:~:text=Porcelain%2C%20china%2C%20and%20even%20pottery,enamel%20and%20then%20stainless%20steel.&text=Today%20these%20antique%20bedpans%20are,be%20found%20in%20antique%20stores.
Cassandra Good, “The Strange Saga of George Washington’s Bedpan,” August 20th, 2015. Smithsonian Magazine. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/strange-saga-george-washingtons-bedpan-180956347/
"Hospital & Physicians Equipment and Supplies," by J.F. Hartz Co., 1960, p. 269
Research Facts
Before the late nineteenth century, bedpans and similar objects were made of metals such as pewter, brass, and sometimes even glass. By the late nineteenth century, porcelain, china, and pottery were used. As the 20th century dawned, bedpans, urinals, basins, etc. were made of enamel and later stainless steel. In the 1960s, there was a shift towards plastics and other disposables.
The bedpan was designed for people who could not or should not rise from their beds to relieve themselves of human waste. A bedpan could be lightly heated and placed under the covers of the beds of the elderly, people who were ill, and women recovering from childbirth so that they would not have to get out of bed. They were routinely emptied by caregivers, nurses, etc.
This bedpan style is a "slipper" type, later referred to as a fracture bedpan and can be slipped under the patient. The spout is to facilitate washing it out. Fracture bedpans are smaller than standard size bedpans, and have one flat end. This bedpan style is designed specifically for patients who are bedridden and have limited movement to use a standard style bedpan.
Images
Less detail
Dates
1900
1930
circa 1900-1930
Collection
Kingston General Hospital School of Nursing Alumnae Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Hygiene
Classification
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Bedpan
Home Health Care
Accession Number
995002108 a-b
Description
Slipper-shaped, hollow enamel bedpan (a), rounded at front and tapering at the back with a closed, squared end; open cylindrical spout at front; round opening on top that is covered with (b) a lid, which is round with a knob on top; lip on inside of lid.
  4 images  
Accession Number
995002108 a-b
Collection
Kingston General Hospital School of Nursing Alumnae Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Hygiene
Classification
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Bedpan
Home Health Care
MeSH Heading
Toilet Facilities
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Description
Slipper-shaped, hollow enamel bedpan (a), rounded at front and tapering at the back with a closed, squared end; open cylindrical spout at front; round opening on top that is covered with (b) a lid, which is round with a knob on top; lip on inside of lid.
Number Of Parts
2
Part Names
a - bedpan - Size: Length 48.5 cm x Width 32.5 cm x Depth 12.5 cm
b - lid - Size: Depth 3.8 cm x Diameter 20.0 cm
Provenance
Donated by Betty Black; owned by friend's aunt.
Dates
1900
1930
circa 1900-1930
Material
metal: silver; brown
enamel: dark blue; grey; black; white
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0007
0007-N1-2
Condition Remarks
Enamel chipped at edges and metal shows some inactive corrosion.
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Website
Article
Book
Reference Comments
American Association for the History of Nursing, https://www.aahn.org/bedpans#:~:text=Porcelain%2C%20china%2C%20and%20even%20pottery,enamel%20and%20then%20stainless%20steel.&text=Today%20these%20antique%20bedpans%20are,be%20found%20in%20antique%20stores.
Cassandra Good, “The Strange Saga of George Washington’s Bedpan,” August 20th, 2015. Smithsonian Magazine. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/strange-saga-george-washingtons-bedpan-180956347/
"Hospital & Physicians Equipment and Supplies," by J.F. Hartz Co., 1960, p. 269
Research Facts
Before the late nineteenth century, bedpans and similar objects were made of metals such as pewter, brass, and sometimes even glass. By the late nineteenth century, porcelain, china, and pottery were used. As the 20th century dawned, bedpans, urinals, basins, etc. were made of enamel and later stainless steel. In the 1960s, there was a shift towards plastics and other disposables.
The bedpan was designed for people who could not or should not rise from their beds to relieve themselves. A bedpan could be lightly heated and placed under the covers of the beds of the elderly, people who were ill, and women recovering from childbirth so that they would not have to get out of bed. They were routinely emptied by caregivers, nurses, etc.
This bedpan style is a "slipper" type, later referred to as a fracture bedpan and can be slipped under the patient. The spout is to facilitate washing it out. Fracture bedpans are smaller than standard size bedpans, and have one flat end. This bedpan style is designed specifically for patients who are bedridden and have limited movement to use a standard style bedpan.
Images
Less detail
Dates
1900
1930
circa 1900-1930
Collection
Hotel Dieu Hospital Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Hygiene
Classification
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Bedpan
Home Health Care
Accession Number
997009001 a-b
Description
Enamel-covered metal bedpan with lid, which consists of: (a) bedpan with an open top and a cylindrical spout at the front; the bedpan is rounded at the top and tapers to a square closed dovetail shape at the bottom; the base of the bedpan is flat; there is a round opening above this that is covered…
  2 images  
Accession Number
997009001 a-b
Collection
Hotel Dieu Hospital Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Hygiene
Classification
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Bedpan
Home Health Care
MeSH Heading
Toilet Facilities
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Description
Enamel-covered metal bedpan with lid, which consists of: (a) bedpan with an open top and a cylindrical spout at the front; the bedpan is rounded at the top and tapers to a square closed dovetail shape at the bottom; the base of the bedpan is flat; there is a round opening above this that is covered with (b) a round enamel-covered metal lid with a rounded handle on the outer centre; the rest of the bedpan is closed; the enamel coating is white with a blue stripe at the edges
Number Of Parts
2
Part Names
a - bedpan
b - lid
Provenance
Purchased and used at the Hotel Dieu Hospital, Kingston, Ontario.
Dates
1900
1930
circa 1900-1930
Material
metal: dark grey
enamel: white; blue
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0007
0007-N1-1
Condition Remarks
The bedpan and lid arrived dirty and dusty; there are several large chips in the enamel coating - especially at the edges; some corrosion is visible where the metal has been exposed
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Website
Article
Reference Comments
American Association for the History of Nursing, https://www.aahn.org/bedpans#:~:text=Porcelain%2C%20china%2C%20and%20even%20pottery,enamel%20and%20then%20stainless%20steel.&text=Today%20these%20antique%20bedpans%20are,be%20found%20in%20antique%20stores.
Cassandra Good, “The Strange Saga of George Washington’s Bedpan,” August 20th, 2015. Smithsonian Magazine. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/strange-saga-george-washingtons-bedpan-180956347/
Research Facts
Before the late nineteenth century, bedpans and similar objects were made of metals such as pewter, brass, and sometimes even glass. By the late nineteenth century, porcelain, china, and pottery were used. As the 20th century dawned, bedpans, urinals, basins, etc. were made of enamel and later stainless steel. In the 1960s, there was a shift towards plastics and other disposables.
The bedpan was designed for people who could not or should not rise from their beds to relieve themselves. A bedpan could be lightly heated and placed under the covers of the beds of the elderly, people who were ill, and women recovering from childbirth so that they would not have to get out of bed. They were routinely emptied by caregivers, nurses, etc.
This bedpan style is a "slipper" type, later referred to as a fracture bedpan and can be slipped under the patient. The spout is to facilitate washing it out. Fracture bedpans are smaller than standard size bedpans, and have one flat end. This bedpan style is designed specifically for patients who are bedridden and have limited movement to use a standard style bedpan.
Images
Less detail
Dates
1900
1930
circa 1900-1930
Collection
Sadie A. Allen Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Hygiene
Classification
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Bedpan
Home Health Care
Accession Number
996016001
Description
Oval umber coloured porcelain bedpan with dovetail front and a circular spout at the back.
  1 image  
Accession Number
996016001
Collection
Sadie A. Allen Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Hygiene
Classification
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Bedpan
Home Health Care
MeSH Heading
Toilet Facilities
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Description
Oval umber coloured porcelain bedpan with dovetail front and a circular spout at the back.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Owned by donor, Sadie A. Allen.
Dates
1900
1930
circa 1900-1930
Material
porcelain: gold
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0007
0007-N1-3
Length
44.4 cm
Width
27.5 cm
Depth
12.6 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Dimension Notes
Length: 44.4 cm. x Width: 27.5 cm. x Depth: 12.6 cm.
Condition Remarks
Bedpan shows no chips, cracks or excessive wear on the porcelain; there are some small unidentified brown marks near the lip of the opening and a small spot of an unidentified substance on the bottom
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Person
Website
Article
Reference Comments
Sadie A. Allen
American Association for the History of Nursing, https://www.aahn.org/bedpans#:~:text=Porcelain%2C%20china%2C%20and%20even%20pottery,enamel%20and%20then%20stainless%20steel.&text=Today%20these%20antique%20bedpans%20are,be%20found%20in%20antique%20stores.
Cassandra Good, “The Strange Saga of George Washington’s Bedpan,” August 20th, 2015. Smithsonian Magazine. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/strange-saga-george-washingtons-bedpan-180956347/
Research Facts
Before the late nineteenth century, bedpans and similar objects were made of metals such as pewter, brass, and sometimes even glass. By the late nineteenth century, porcelain, china, and pottery were used. As the 20th century dawned, bedpans, urinals, basins, etc. were made of enamel and later stainless steel. In the 1960s, there was a shift towards plastics and other disposables.
The bedpan was designed for people who could not or should not rise from their beds to relieve themselves. A bedpan could be lightly heated and placed under the covers of the beds of the elderly, people who were ill, and women recovering from childbirth so that they would not have to get out of bed. They were routinely emptied by caregivers, nurses, etc.
This bedpan style is a "slipper" type, later referred to as a fracture bedpan and can be slipped under the patient. The spout is to facilitate washing it out. Fracture bedpans are smaller than standard size bedpans, and have one flat end. This bedpan style is designed specifically for patients who are bedridden and have limited movement to use a standard style bedpan.
Exhibit History
To display in Museum: Potions, Pills and Prescriptions; May 1, 2000 - 28 Jan 2017.
Images
Less detail
Dates
1940
1960
circa 1940-1960
Collection
Rockwood / Kingston Psychiatric Hospital / Providence Continuing Care Centre Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Hygiene
Classification
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Bedpan
Home Health Care
Accession Number
000003109
Description
A stainless steel bedpan: oval in shape with a continuous rim and a spout; it tapers towards the spout end; its corners and edges are rounded.
  2 images  
Accession Number
000003109
Collection
Rockwood / Kingston Psychiatric Hospital / Providence Continuing Care Centre Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Hygiene
Classification
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Bedpan
Home Health Care
MeSH Heading
Toilet Facilities
Patient Care
Hygiene
Sanitation
Description
A stainless steel bedpan: oval in shape with a continuous rim and a spout; it tapers towards the spout end; its corners and edges are rounded.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Used at the Kingston Psychiatric Hospital
Maker
Allen & Hanburys Co. Ltd.
Site Made (City)
London
Site Made (Country)
England
Dates
1940
1960
circa 1940-1960
Date Remarks
Allen & Hanburys was absorbed by Glaxo in 1958; stainless steel was used in bedpans in the early to mid twentieth century.
Material
metal: silver
Inscriptions
"ALLEN & HANBURYS"; a hollow rectangle encases the words, "TAWLITE // MADE IN ENGLAND // 18-8 STAINLESS // STEEL" and "578/SM"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0007
0007-N1-4
Length
35.4 cm
Width
28.7 cm
Depth
11.5 cm
Dimension Notes
Length 35.4 cm x Width 28.7 cm x Depth 11.5 cm
Condition Remarks
The bedpan was dusty and there were some dirt particles inside; there are signs of recently active corrosion; there are small rust spots along the outer side at the narrow end, and on the bottom inside; there are water marks, minor deposits and other signs of wear such as small scratches on the bedpan; there is one small, round dent on the outside bottom of the pan.
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Book
Websites
Article
Reference Comments
American Association for the History of Nursing, https://www.aahn.org/bedpans#:~:text=Porcelain%2C%20china%2C%20and%20even%20pottery,enamel%20and%20then%20stainless%20steel.&text=Today%20these%20antique%20bedpans%20are,be%20found%20in%20antique%20stores.
Cassandra Good, “The Strange Saga of George Washington’s Bedpan,” August 20th, 2015. Smithsonian Magazine. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/strange-saga-george-washingtons-bedpan-180956347/
"Hospital and Physicians Equipment and Supplies," the J.F. Hartz Co., 1960, p. 267
"Allen & Hanburys' Surgical Appliances," Feb 14, 2013. https://spitalfieldslife.com/2013/02/14/allen-hanburys-surgical-appliances/
Research Facts
Before the late nineteenth century, bedpans and similar objects were made of metals such as pewter, brass, and sometimes even glass. By the late nineteenth century, porcelain, china, and pottery were used. As the 20th century dawned, bedpans, urinals, basins, etc. were made of enamel and later stainless steel. In the 1960s, there was a shift towards plastics and other disposables.
The bedpan was designed for people who could not or should not rise from their beds to relieve themselves. A bedpan could be lightly heated and placed under the covers of the beds of the elderly, people who were ill, and women recovering from childbirth so that they would not have to get out of bed. They were routinely emptied by caregivers, nurses, etc.
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