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Dates
1892
circa 1892
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Accession Number
1986.2.1
Description
Hand-sewn baby binder is a strip of cloth that narrows at each end; woven tape ties at each end; a vertical slit in the cloth about 1/3 of the way from one end; linen lined with flanelette.
  1 image  
Accession Number
1986.2.1
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
MeSH Heading
Clothing
Textiles
Infant Care
Description
Hand-sewn baby binder is a strip of cloth that narrows at each end; woven tape ties at each end; a vertical slit in the cloth about 1/3 of the way from one end; linen lined with flanelette.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Acquired from the Academy of Medicine; source: Mrs. T.G. Brown of Toronto.
Site Made (Country)
Canada
Dates
1892
circa 1892
Material
fabric: white
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0007
BOX 17
Dimension Notes
Length 62.0 cm x Width 10.5 cm (minus tapes, which are 31.0-37.0 cm long)
Condition Remarks
Scorch marks on both sides.
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
JPG
Reference Comments
CD #4
Research Facts
The binder was made for the donor's father, born in 1892 in Berlin (now Kitchener), Ontario, and used for his brothers, 1892-1902; binders were used until ca. 1950 to bind the baby's umbilical area, probably because of a traditional belief that if it were not bound, the umbilicus would not heal properly after birth, or an umbilical hernia would occur.
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Less detail
Dates
1892
circa 1892
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Accession Number
1986.2.2
Description
Hand-sewn baby binder is a strip of cloth that narrows at each end; woven tape ties at each end; a vertical slit in the cloth about 1/3 of the way from one end; both sides made of flanelette.
  1 image  
Accession Number
1986.2.2
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
MeSH Heading
Clothing
Textiles
Infant Care
Description
Hand-sewn baby binder is a strip of cloth that narrows at each end; woven tape ties at each end; a vertical slit in the cloth about 1/3 of the way from one end; both sides made of flanelette.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Acquired from the Academy of Medicine; source: Mrs. T.G. Brown of Toronto.
Site Made (Country)
Canada
Dates
1892
circa 1892
Material
fabric: white
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0007
0007 Box 8
Dimension Notes
Length 62.0 cm x Width 10.5 cm (minus tapes, which are 31.0-37.0 cm long)
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
JPG
Reference Comments
CD #4
Research Facts
The binder was made for the donor's father, born in 1892 in Berlin (now Kitchener), Ontario, and used for his brothers, 1892-1902; binders were used until ca. 1950 to bind the baby's umbilical area, probably because of a traditional belief that if it were not bound, the umbilicus would not heal properly after birth, or an umbilical hernia would occur.
Images
Less detail
Dates
1930
1940
circa 1930-1940
Category
Home Health Care
Pediatrics
Classification
Home Health
Home Health Care
Paediatrics
Accession Number
018006001
Description
Heavy porcelain bowl with light blue glaze; the bowl is divided into three compartments, two quarters and one half; between one of the quarters and the half, there is a hole in which a cork sits; the bowl is hollow inside, and on the outside the bowl becomes wider the closer it is to the bottom, so…
  5 images  
Accession Number
018006001
Category
Home Health Care
Pediatrics
Classification
Home Health
Home Health Care
Paediatrics
MeSH Heading
Infant Care
Infant Food
Infant Nutrition
Pediatrics
Home Health
Food
Feeding Methods
Child
Child Nutrition
Description
Heavy porcelain bowl with light blue glaze; the bowl is divided into three compartments, two quarters and one half; between one of the quarters and the half, there is a hole in which a cork sits; the bowl is hollow inside, and on the outside the bowl becomes wider the closer it is to the bottom, so there are two indents in the bowl around the edge; the bottom of the bowl contains three white rings, each one smaller as it reaches the centre of the bowl; inside the smallest ring, the middle of the bowl is indented to form a concave impression.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Belonged to donor's family. Used by all toddlers in the family.
Dates
1930
1940
circa 1930-1940
Date Remarks
Based on donor's remarks
Material
porcelain: blue, white
cork: brown
ink: brown
Inscriptions
Printed on cork: "7189".
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D3-8
Height
7.0 cm
Diameter
18.7 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
The small section nearest the cork has a crack in the side; some slight colour loss in small spots on the top and bottom of the bowl around the cork.
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Donor, website
Reference Comments
Donor's remarks
TheRetroRescuers, Vintage Hankscraft Baby Food Warmer Dish ~Periwinkle Blue: https://www.etsy.com/sg-en/listing/594103122/vintage-hankscraft-baby-food-warmer-dish
Research Facts
This dish was used to feed toddlers. Warm water would be poured into the hollow portion and plugged with a matching lid, which in this case has been replaced by a cork. The water inside the dish would keep the food warm. The ridged base and the heavy weight of the bowl kept toddlers from throwing the bowl on the ground, etc.
Similar items were made by a company called Hankscraft.
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The Baby [infant care book]

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact15202
Dates
1924
1930
circa 1924-1930
Category
Archival Items
Education Artifacts
Pediatrics
Home Health Care
Classification
Archival, Publications
Education
Paediatrics
Home Health
Home Health Care
Accession Number
019001001
Description
Rectangular book with a glued binding and paper covers; the front cover contains a colour illustration of two toddlers on a beach, one wearing a red swim suit and grabbing the other's hand, who is wearing a green swim suit; the background is mostly brown, and near the top. the title "The Baby" is p…
  5 images  
Accession Number
019001001
Author
Department of Health of Ontario
Category
Archival Items
Education Artifacts
Pediatrics
Home Health Care
Classification
Archival, Publications
Education
Paediatrics
Home Health
Home Health Care
MeSH Heading
Infant Care -- handbooks
Infant Care
Infant Nutrition
Child Care -- handbooks
Child Nutrition
Child
Mother-Child Relations -- handbooks
Pregnancy
Pediatrics
Home Health
Description
Rectangular book with a glued binding and paper covers; the front cover contains a colour illustration of two toddlers on a beach, one wearing a red swim suit and grabbing the other's hand, who is wearing a green swim suit; the background is mostly brown, and near the top. the title "The Baby" is printed in flourished script and outlined in pink; the spine is white and also contains the title and small illustrations of children's toys and animals; the back cover is backgrounded in black and contains a yellow, orange, pink, and red illustration of numerous children playing on a beach with a giant baby in the background in front of the sun, mouth open and holding up a rattle as birds fly in front of it; the book has sixty four pages and contains information about pre-natal care, preparation for confinement, registration of the baby's birth, care of the infant, infant feeding, care of the runabout child, common ailments of childhood, immunization, baby's record, and baby's development.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Belonged to donor.
Maker
Department of Health of Ontario
Site Made (City)
Toronto
Site Made (State)
Ontario
Site Made (Country)
Canada
Dates
1924
1930
circa 1924-1930
Date Remarks
Honourable Forbes Godfrey was Minister of Health in Ontario from 1924 until 1930.
Material
paper: tan
ink: black, green, pink, red, grey, purple, brown, tan, yellow, orange.
Inscriptions
Printed on front cover: "The Baby"; printed on back cover: "Issued by the Department of Health of Ontario. // Honorable Forbes Godfrey - Minister of Health".
Permanent Location
Storage Room 2005
2005-3
Length
22.5 cm
Width
15.0 cm
Height
0.8 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Minor fraying at spine and bending at corners
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Websites
Reference Comments
https://www.ola.org/en/members/all/forbes-elliott-godfrey
https://www.ola.org/en/members/all/harold-james-kirby
https://www.leonardshoup.com/product/64654/The-Baby--Department-of-Health-of-Ontario-----Dionne-Quintuplets-Cover-Art-No-Author--Department-of-Health-of-Ontario-Honourable-Harold-J-Kirby-Minister
http://mimicohistory.blogspot.com/2011/05/dr-forbes-godfrey-first-ontario.html
Research Facts
A later edition of this book, from 1937-1942, in print while Harold J. Kirby was Ontario's Minister of Health, has an illustration of the famous Dionne quintuplets on the front cover.
Forbes Godfrey was Ontario's first Minister of Health, and he was a doctor before entering the realm of politics. Dr. Godfrey wanted the government to do more to combat tuberculosis, as the disease was devastating Ontario's citizens. As a result of his efforts, a system of government supported tuberculosis hospitals was created. Dr. Godfrey was also a strong believer in vaccination. He was responsible for organizing the ministry of health from its beginnings, and he helped protect miners from silicosis; started industrial health programs; created public health clinics in remote areas, and began free immunization programs for Ontario school children.
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Dates
1912
circa 1912
Collection
Kingston General Hospital Auxiliary Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Accession Number
001029003
Description
Red, white, and blue baby bunting; made with three pieces of fabric sewn together with blue on top, white in the middle, and red on bottom; the blue piece's edge is folded into a loop with a hard object inside.
  1 image  
Accession Number
001029003
Collection
Kingston General Hospital Auxiliary Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
MeSH Heading
Clothing
Textiles
Infant Care
Description
Red, white, and blue baby bunting; made with three pieces of fabric sewn together with blue on top, white in the middle, and red on bottom; the blue piece's edge is folded into a loop with a hard object inside.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Used as a decoration in a parade the KGH Women's Aid held to raise money for KGH's new Empire Wing (this is most likely a modern reproduction).
Maker
KGH Women's Aid
Site Made (City)
Kingston
Site Made (State)
Ontario
Site Made (Country)
Canada
Dates
1912
circa 1912
Date Remarks
If original; but this is most likely a modern reproduction
Material
fabric: red; white; blue
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0007
BOX 17
Dimension Notes
Length 74.0 cm x Width 35 cm
Condition Remarks
Like new
Reference Types
JPG
Reference Comments
"A Short History of the Women's Aid of the Kingston General Hospital 1905-1968," by Mary I. Campbell, KGH, Kingston, Ontario, Canada; CD #4.
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The Canadian Mother and Child [reference book]

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact12737
Dates
1940
Collection
Elsie Vercoe Collection
Category
Archival Items
Classification
Archival, Publications
Accession Number
009021006
Description
Paperback reference book with illustrations; discussing maternal and child care; topics include medical attention, normal accompaniments of pregnancy, hygiene of pregnancy, complications of pregnancy, birth and others; title and Government of Canada shield printed on front cover; 232 pages.
  2 images  
Accession Number
009021006
Author
Ernest Couture
Collection
Elsie Vercoe Collection
Category
Archival Items
Classification
Archival, Publications
MeSH Heading
Reference Books
Infant Care
Pregnancy
Maternal Welfare
Description
Paperback reference book with illustrations; discussing maternal and child care; topics include medical attention, normal accompaniments of pregnancy, hygiene of pregnancy, complications of pregnancy, birth and others; title and Government of Canada shield printed on front cover; 232 pages.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Owned by Elsie Vercoe; forwarded to museum by Marie M. McCalden (Power of Attorney)
Maker
J. O. Patenaude, I. S. O.
Site Made (City)
Ottawa
Site Made (State)
Ontario
Site Made (Country)
Canada
Dates
1940
Date Remarks
Printed in book
Material
paper: cream, brown
ink: black
Inscriptions
Printed in book: "The // CANADIAN // MOTHER // AND CHILD // BY // ERNEST COUTURE, M. D., // Director of the // CHILD AND MATERNAL HEALTH HYGIENE DIVISION // CANADA // Published by the authority of // The Hon. IAN A. MACKENZIE, Minister of Pensions and National Health // OTTAWA, CANADA"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 2005
2005-3
Dimension Notes
Length 22.9 cm x Width 15.2 cm x Depth 1.3 cm
Condition Remarks
Cover severely ripped; minor oil stains on cover
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
JPG
Reference Comments
CD #4
Images
Less detail

Infant Feeding and Management [reference book]

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact12736
Dates
1923
Collection
Elsie Vercoe Collection
Category
Archival Items
Classification
Archival, Publications
Accession Number
009021005
Description
Paperback reference book with illustrations; discussing the care of infants; topics include human and other milk types, quantities and hours for feeding, minor infant ailments, isolation and disinfection, direct testimony and others; front and back cover has colourful drawings of babies and childre…
  2 images  
Accession Number
009021005
Collection
Elsie Vercoe Collection
Category
Archival Items
Classification
Archival, Publications
MeSH Heading
Reference Books
Infant Care
Description
Paperback reference book with illustrations; discussing the care of infants; topics include human and other milk types, quantities and hours for feeding, minor infant ailments, isolation and disinfection, direct testimony and others; front and back cover has colourful drawings of babies and children on black background; 116 pages.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Owned by Elsie Vercoe; forwarded to museum by Marie M. McCalden (Power of Attorney)
Maker
Allen & Hanburys Co. Ltd.
Site Made (City)
London
Site Made (Country)
England
Dates
1923
Date Remarks
Printed in book
Material
paper: brown
ink: black, red, orange, blue, green
Inscriptions
Printed in book: "Infant Feeding // By a Succession of Foods // adapted to the Growing Digestive // Powers of the Child // With Notes on // General Management // Allen & Hanburys Ltd. // APRIL, 1923."
Permanent Location
Storage Room 2005
2005-3
Dimension Notes
Length 19.5 cm x Width 13.5 cm x Depth 0.5 cm
Condition Remarks
Cover ripped; torn away from staples; paper faded
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
JPG
Reference Comments
CD #4
Images
Less detail

infant feeding bottle

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact14442
Dates
1880
1910
circa 1880-1910
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Home Health Care
Classification
Patient Care
Nursing
Accession Number
016001058
Description
Clear glass 'turtle' shaped infant feeding bottle with rounded bottom and angled neck for cork or rubber teat closure; visible mould line around edges; hand blown glass; front flat area with embossed measurement gradations on front.
  1 image  
Accession Number
016001058
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Home Health Care
Classification
Patient Care
Nursing
MeSH Heading
Pediatrics
Infant Care
Infant Food
Nursing Care
Nursing Care -- instrumentation
Description
Clear glass 'turtle' shaped infant feeding bottle with rounded bottom and angled neck for cork or rubber teat closure; visible mould line around edges; hand blown glass; front flat area with embossed measurement gradations on front.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and Alice Roeder.
Dates
1880
1910
circa 1880-1910
Material
glass: transparent
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1
Length
16.4 cm
Width
9.0 cm
Depth
7.5 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Shows wear and interior with minor residue
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Documents Book Internet
Reference Comments
Allison, Eileen Michael. Ceramic Invalid Feeders, Pap Boats, and Baby Bottles of the 19th & Twentieth Century. Canada: E. M. Allison, 1997.; American Collectors of Infant Feeders
Research Facts
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and sister Alice Roeder, a retired nurse. The collection consists of various eras and types of invalid / infant feeders, infant milk bottles, medicine spoons, urinals and reference material.
Names associated with this item include: baby bottle, nurser, infant nursing bottle, antique baby bottles, glass baby Bottles, milk bottles, Victorian, Victorian baby, Victorian baby feeding bottle
The design of glass baby feeding bottles from 1860-1900 were hard to clean due to the glass screw or cork closures and long rubber tubes ending with rubber teats. This bottle design allowed the infant to self-feed.
This innovation freed the mother from the hassle and discomfort of nursing and wearing a nursing corset, and allowed her the opportunity to tend to her other chores (this was particularly useful for those members of the middle to lower classes who needed to work). A contributing factor to the deadly growth of bacteria throughout the bottle design was that these bottles were not sterilized, only washed every two or three weeks.
This lack of sanitation allowed for deadly bacteria to flourish, and lead to doctors condemning the use of these bottles – now nicknamed ‘Murder Bottles’ – as they contributed to the high infant mortality rates of the late 1800s (only two out of ten babies would survived until two years of age).
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infant feeding bottle

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact14441
Dates
1891
1910
circa 1891-1910
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Home Health Care
Classification
Patient Care
Nursing
Accession Number
016001059
Description
Purple tinged clear glass 'turtle' shaped infant feeding bottle with rounded bottom and angled neck for cork or rubber teat closure; visible mould line around edges; hand blown glass; front flat area with embossed product name; measurement gradations on front cork in valve opening with minor miss…
  1 image  
Accession Number
016001059
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Home Health Care
Classification
Patient Care
Nursing
MeSH Heading
Pediatrics
Infant Care
Infant Food
Nursing Care
Nursing Care -- instrumentation
Description
Purple tinged clear glass 'turtle' shaped infant feeding bottle with rounded bottom and angled neck for cork or rubber teat closure; visible mould line around edges; hand blown glass; front flat area with embossed product name; measurement gradations on front cork in valve opening with minor missing glass around edge.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and Alice Roeder.
Site Made (Country)
England
Dates
1891
1910
circa 1891-1910
Material
glass: transparent
Inscriptions
Embossed on feeder: "FLUID OUNCES // THE BEST // PAT. SEP 1. 91 // THE GOTHAM CO. N.Y."
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1
Length
17.5 cm
Width
9.0 cm
Depth
6.5 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Cork shows wear and missing minor amount; interior with minor residue
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Documents Book Internet
Reference Comments
Allison, Eileen Michael. Ceramic Invalid Feeders, Pap Boats, and Baby Bottles of the 19th & Twentieth Century. Canada: E. M. Allison, 1997.; American Collectors of Infant Feeders
Research Facts
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and sister Alice Roeder, a retired nurse. The collection consists of various eras and types of invalid / infant feeders, infant milk bottles, medicine spoons, urinals and reference material.
Names associated with this item include: baby bottle, nurser, infant nursing bottle, antique baby bottles, glass baby Bottles, milk bottles, Victorian, Victorian baby, Victorian baby feeding bottle
The design of glass baby feeding bottles from 1860-1900 were hard to clean due to the glass screw or cork closures and long rubber tubes ending with rubber teats. This bottle design allowed the infant to self-feed.
This innovation freed the mother from the hassle and discomfort of nursing and wearing a nursing corset, and allowed her the opportunity to tend to her other chores (this was particularly useful for those members of the middle to lower classes who needed to work). A contributing factor to the deadly growth of bacteria throughout the bottle design was that these bottles were not sterilized, only washed every two or three weeks.
This lack of sanitation allowed for deadly bacteria to flourish, and lead to doctors condemning the use of these bottles – now nicknamed ‘Murder Bottles’ – as they contributed to the high infant mortality rates of the late 1800s (only two out of ten babies would survived until two years of age).
Images
Less detail

infant feeding bottle

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact14440
Dates
1880
1910
circa 1880-1910
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Home Health Care
Classification
Patient Care
Nursing
Accession Number
016001060 a-b
Description
Two piece clear glass 'turtle' shaped infant feeding bottle (a) with separate clear glass screw (b) with centre hole for rubber tube, tube missing; squared off bottom with angled neck threaded to receive screw closure; visible mould line around edges; hand blown glass; front flat area with embosse…
  1 image  
Accession Number
016001060 a-b
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Home Health Care
Classification
Patient Care
Nursing
MeSH Heading
Pediatrics
Infant Care
Infant Food
Nursing Care
Nursing Care -- instrumentation
Description
Two piece clear glass 'turtle' shaped infant feeding bottle (a) with separate clear glass screw (b) with centre hole for rubber tube, tube missing; squared off bottom with angled neck threaded to receive screw closure; visible mould line around edges; hand blown glass; front flat area with embossed product name.
Number Of Parts
2
Part Names
a - bottle
b - screw
Provenance
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and Alice Roeder.
Site Made (Country)
England
Dates
1880
1910
circa 1880-1910
Material
glass: transparent
Inscriptions
Embossed on feeder: "IMPROVED // FEEDING BOTTLE"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1
Length
a - 15.7 cm
b - 3.1 cm
Width
a - 10.0 cm
Depth
a - 7.5 cm
Diameter
b - 3.3 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Documents Book Internet
Reference Comments
Allison, Eileen Michael. Ceramic Invalid Feeders, Pap Boats, and Baby Bottles of the 19th & Twentieth Century. Canada: E. M. Allison, 1997.; American Collectors of Infant Feeders
Research Facts
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and sister Alice Roeder, a retired nurse. The collection consists of various eras and types of invalid / infant feeders, infant milk bottles, medicine spoons, urinals and reference material.
Names associated with this item include: baby bottle, nurser, infant nursing bottle, antique baby bottles, glass baby Bottles, milk bottles, Victorian, Victorian baby, Victorian baby feeding bottle
The design of glass baby feeding bottles from 1860-1900 were hard to clean due to the glass screw or cork closures and long rubber tubes ending with rubber teats. This bottle design allowed the infant to self-feed.
This innovation freed the mother from the hassle and discomfort of nursing and wearing a nursing corset, and allowed her the opportunity to tend to her other chores (this was particularly useful for those members of the middle to lower classes who needed to work). A contributing factor to the deadly growth of bacteria throughout the bottle design was that these bottles were not sterilized, only washed every two or three weeks.
This lack of sanitation allowed for deadly bacteria to flourish, and lead to doctors condemning the use of these bottles – now nicknamed ‘Murder Bottles’ – as they contributed to the high infant mortality rates of the late 1800s (only two out of ten babies would survived until two years of age).
Images
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19 records – page 1 of 2.