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Diagnosis of Jaundice [celluloid phonograph cylinder]

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact7043
Dates
1908
1912
circa 1908-1912
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Education Artifacts
Classification
Education
Accession Number
1977.11.11 a-c
Description
Black celluloid phonograph cylinder in the original lidded blue cardboard container; lid and top edge of cylinder have the series number, title, and author's last name; holds four minutes of recorded information.
  1 image  
Accession Number
1977.11.11 a-c
Author
Dr. Henry A. Christian, Prof. Medicine
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Education Artifacts
Classification
Education
MeSH Heading
Teaching Materials
Audiovisual Aids
Education, Medical
Jaundice
Description
Black celluloid phonograph cylinder in the original lidded blue cardboard container; lid and top edge of cylinder have the series number, title, and author's last name; holds four minutes of recorded information.
Number Of Parts
3
Part Names
a - lid - Size: Depth 1.4 cm x Diam. 6.5 cm
b - container - Size: Length 11.0 cm x Diam. 6.0 cm
c - cylinder - Size: Length 10.0 cm x Diam. 5.6 cm
Provenance
Acquired from the Academy of Medicine; source: Percy Skuy, Toronto, Ont.
Maker
The Medicophone Post-Graduate Co.
Site Made (City)
New York
Site Made (State)
New York
Site Made (Country)
United States of America
Dates
1908
1912
circa 1908-1912
Date Remarks
Manufacturer's dates for production of celluloid cylinders.
Material
ink: black
cardboard: light blue; beige; black
plastic: black
Inscriptions
Printed on outside of canister: "THE // U-S // Everlasting // RECORD"; "Greatest in volume, sweetest and purest in tone // Unbreakable and wears forever // THE // MEDICOPHONE POST- // GRADUATE CO. Sells this record upon the // express condition that it will // not be sold to any un- // authorized dealer, nor used // in making duplicates, and // that it shall not be sold or // offered for sale by any pur- // chaser thereof for less than // $1.00. Any breach of this // condition terminates the // licence to use and vend this record. // NOTICE: // This record will fit any // cylinder machine and can // be reproduced or played by // cylinder phonograph // that plays the ordinary four // minute musical record by // slowing down the speed of // machine to 80 revolutions // per minute."
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0007
0007-R2-3
Condition Remarks
#2: Shows wear around edges; plastic bag around cylinder adhered in several areas and bulks out the container.
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Internet
Reference Comments
On-line articles "Cylinder Preservation and Digitization Project - U.S. Everlasting Cylinders"; "Phonograph Cylinder"; CD #UHN
Research Facts
The phonograph was invented by Thomas Edison; he patented it on 18 July 1877 as the first device for recording and playing sound; his first attempt was using telephone messages; his first test used waxed paper. Early cylinder machines of the late 1880s and 1890s were often sold with recording attachments. The ability to record as well as to play back sound was an advantage to cylinder phonographs over the competition from cheaper disc phonographs that began to be mass-marketed at the end of the 1890s, as the disc system machines could be used only to play back pre-recorded sound. Edison Records closed down in 1929, and Thomas Edison died in 1931. In 1906, the Indestructable Record Company began mass-marketing cylinder records made of celluloid, an early hard plastic that would not break if dropped and could be played thousands of times without wearing out. This hard, inflexible material could not be shaved and recorded over like wax cylinders, but had the advantage of being a nearly perfect record. The U.S. Phonograph Company of Cleveland, Ohio, produced both two- and four-minute cylinders under its own label, "U.S. Everlasting Records," and under the Lakeside label for Montgomery Ward department stores. Between 1908 and 1912, more than 1,000 titles were released in three series: popular, foreign language, and grand opera. Like Edison, Blue Amberols, and indestructible cylinders, Everlasting cylinders were made of celluloid, but their sound quality is superior to either of them. The Medicophone Post-Graduate Co., a part of U.S. Everlasting Records, produced a series of recordings to provide professional medical advice on a variety of diseases and topics for physicians. Cylinder is noted as series title # X-213. In 1968, the celluloid cylinders were professionally recorded on magnetic tape by the Syracuse University Libraries Re-recording Laboratory. The complete series is stored on a master and duplicate reels. This title is found on reels 1977.11.40 and .46.
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Diagnosis & Treatment of Alcoholic Jaundice [celluloid phonograph cylinder]

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact7046
Dates
1908
1912
circa 1908-1912
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Education Artifacts
Classification
Education
Accession Number
1977.11.14 a-c
Description
Black celluloid phonograph cylinder in the original lidded blue cardboard container; lid and top edge of cylinder have the series number, title, and author's last name; holds four minutes of recorded information.
  1 image  
Accession Number
1977.11.14 a-c
Author
Dr. Henry A. Christian, Prof. Medicine
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Education Artifacts
Classification
Education
MeSH Heading
Teaching Materials
Audiovisual Aids
Education, Medical
Jaundice
Description
Black celluloid phonograph cylinder in the original lidded blue cardboard container; lid and top edge of cylinder have the series number, title, and author's last name; holds four minutes of recorded information.
Number Of Parts
3
Part Names
a - lid - Size: Depth 1.4 cm x Diam. 6.5 cm
b - container - Size: Length 11.0 cm x Diam. 6.0 cm
c - cylinder - Size: Length 10.0 cm x Diam. 5.6 cm
Provenance
Acquired from the Academy of Medicine; source: Percy Skuy, Toronto, Ont.
Maker
The Medicophone Post-Graduate Co.
Site Made (City)
New York
Site Made (State)
New York
Site Made (Country)
United States of America
Dates
1908
1912
circa 1908-1912
Date Remarks
Manufacturer's dates for production of celluloid cylinders.
Material
ink: black
cardboard: light blue; beige; black
plastic: black
Inscriptions
Printed on outside of canister: "THE // U-S // Everlasting // RECORD"; "Greatest in volume, sweetest and purest in tone // Unbreakable and wears forever // THE // MEDICOPHONE POST- // GRADUATE CO. Sells this record upon the // express condition that it will // not be sold to any un- // authorized dealer, nor used // in making duplicates, and // that it shall not be sold or // offered for sale by any pur- // chaser thereof for less than // $1.00. Any breach of this // condition terminates the // licence to use and vend this record. // NOTICE: // This record will fit any // cylinder machine and can // be reproduced or played by // cylinder phonograph // that plays the ordinary four // minute musical record by // slowing down the speed of // machine to 80 revolutions // per minute."
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0007
0007-R2-3
Condition Remarks
#2: Shows wear around edges; plastic bag around cylinder adhered in several areas and bulks out the container.
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Internet
Reference Comments
On-line articles "Cylinder Preservation and Digitization Project - U.S. Everlasting Cylinders"; "Phonograph Cylinder"; CD #UHN
Research Facts
The phonograph was invented by Thomas Edison; he patented it on 18 July 1877 as the first device for recording and playing sound; his first attempt was using telephone messages; his first test used waxed paper. Early cylinder machines of the late 1880s and 1890s were often sold with recording attachments. The ability to record as well as to play back sound was an advantage to cylinder phonographs over the competition from cheaper disc phonographs that began to be mass-marketed at the end of the 1890s, as the disc system machines could be used only to play back pre-recorded sound. Edison Records closed down in 1929, and Thomas Edison died in 1931. In 1906, the Indestructable Record Company began mass-marketing cylinder records made of celluloid, an early hard plastic that would not break if dropped and could be played thousands of times without wearing out. This hard, inflexible material could not be shaved and recorded over like wax cylinders, but had the advantage of being a nearly perfect record. The U.S. Phonograph Company of Cleveland, Ohio, produced both two- and four-minute cylinders under its own label, "U.S. Everlasting Records," and under the Lakeside label for Montgomery Ward department stores. Between 1908 and 1912, more than 1,000 titles were released in three series: popular, foreign language, and grand opera. Like Edison, Blue Amberols, and indestructible cylinders, Everlasting cylinders were made of celluloid, but their sound quality is superior to either of them. The Medicophone Post-Graduate Co., a part of U.S. Everlasting Records, produced a series of recordings to provide professional medical advice on a variety of diseases and topics for physicians. Cylinder is noted as series title # X-217. In 1968, the celluloid cylinders were professionally recorded on magnetic tape by the Syracuse University Libraries Re-recording Laboratory. The complete series is stored on a master and duplicate reels. This title is found on reels 1977.11.40 and .46.
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Dreco Stomach Tonic and Alternative

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact15184
Dates
1928
1940
circa 1928 - 1094
Category
Pharmacy and Drug Artifacts
Classification
Pharmacy, General
Pharmacy, Gastrointestinal
Accession Number
018009002 a-c
Description
Transparent rounded rectangular based glass Dreco Stomach Tonic and Alternative bottle (a) with non-removable cylindrical grey metal screw cap, beige and navy rectangular cardboard box (b) with removable brown rectangular corrugated cardboard box liner (c); bottle three quarters full with brown liq…
  5 images  
Accession Number
018009002 a-c
Category
Pharmacy and Drug Artifacts
Classification
Pharmacy, General
Pharmacy, Gastrointestinal
MeSH Heading
Drug Packaging -- container -- bottle
Drug Packaging -- container -- box and packet
Drugs -- Non-Prescription
Drugs, Non-Prescription
MM= Drug Packaging -- container -- bottle
MM= Drug Packaging -- container -- box
MM= Drugs -- container -- bottle
Constipation -- drug therapy
Jaundice
Headache -- drug therapy
Drugs -- patent, proprietary, over-the-counter multi-purpose cures -- container
MM= Digestive Disorders -- container
MM= Drugs -- digestive disorders
MM= Drugs -- digestive disorders -- container -- bottle
MM= Drugs -- patent, proprietary, over-the-counter -- container -- bottle
MM= Drugs -- patent, proprietary, over-the-counter -- digestive disorders -- container
MM= Drugs -- patent, proprietary, over-the-counter -- headache remedies
MM= Drugs -- patent, proprietary, over-the-counter -- multi-purpose cures
MM= Drugs -- patent, proprietary, over-the-counter -- multi-purpose cures -- container
MM= Drugs -- patent, proprietary, over-the-counter -- headache remedies -- container
Description
Transparent rounded rectangular based glass Dreco Stomach Tonic and Alternative bottle (a) with non-removable cylindrical grey metal screw cap, beige and navy rectangular cardboard box (b) with removable brown rectangular corrugated cardboard box liner (c); bottle three quarters full with brown liquid; flat rectangular front and back walls with top arch; back wall recessed; flat rectangular side walls with product name embossed; round shoulders taper to short cylindrical neck, round neck ring, and cylindrical finish with external lug type thread; rectangular push-up, circular mold mark, and manufacturer information embossed on bottom; mold lines on sides from base to top and around neck; rectangular white and navy paper label with product information and directions in English on front and smaller label with information and directions in French on back; cap has vertical indents on sides and flat top; box has product information and directions in English on front and proper left side and in French on back and proper right sides bordered in decorative geometric patterns; corrugated liner folded into rectangular box shape with open top and bottom ends.
Number Of Parts
3
Part Names
a – bottle – Length 21.1 cm Width 6.9 cm Depth 3.7 cm
b – box – Length 25.1 cm Width 8.0 cm Depth 4.5 cm
c – box liner – Length 16.5 cm Width 7.7 cm Depth 4.3 cm
Provenance
Belonged to donor.
Maker
The Dreco Co. of Canada Limited
Dates
1928
1940
circa 1928 - 1094
Date Remarks
Dominion Glass Company trademarked D-in-diamond logo on the bottom of the bottle in 1928; no date marks present, were first introduced by Dominion in 1940
Material
glass: clear
paper: light brown, white
ink: navy
metal: grey
Inscriptions
Printed on front bottle label: “DRECO // AN EFFECTIVE TONIC // AND ALTERNATIVE // A splendid Remedy for disorders arising from slug- // gish action or functional in- // activity of the liver, kidneys // and bowels. // DIRECTIONS // Take one tablespoonful three time a // day, best taken before meals. If it // acts too freely on the bowels, lessen // the dose: if it does not act free enough, // increase the dose. For children about // 12 years old, a tablespoonful three times // a day. // No. 9280. PROPRIETARY AND PATENT MEDICINE ACT // Distributed by // The DRECO CO. of CANADA // LIMITED. // BALTIMORE, U. S. A. and // MONTREAL, Canada.”; embossed on right and left sides of bottle: “DRECO”; embossed on bottom of bottle: “D”; printed on front of box: “DRECO // No. 9280 The Proprietary and Patent Medicine Act. // A // STOMACH TONIC // and ALTERNATIVE // A splendid remedy // for disorders arising // from sluggish action // or functional inac- // tivity of the liver, // kidneys and bowels. // PRICE $1.25 // DISTRIBUTED BY // Dreco Co. of Canada // LIMITED // MONTREAL, CANADA // also at // BALTIMORE U. S. A.”; printed on proper left side of box: “DRECO – For chronic constipation, biliousness, jaundice, sick headache lassitude and other disorders arising from chronic // inactivity of the stomach, liver and bowels. // In therapeutic activity it covers a wider range than that of simple cathartics since its tendency is to restore the organs con- // cerned in elimination of waste products to a state of normal healthy activity. // It is not intended as a purgative and for some persons it is not sufficiently laxative at the beginning. In such cases where // additional laxative action is necessary, we strongly recommend HI – SPEED LAXATIVE TABLETS to be taken in connection // with DRECO. The formula for these tablets was selected with great care in order that the best results possible would be // obtained from Dreco by their supplemental action.”
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-A
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Minor corrosion all over cap; minor tears in edges and areas of discolouration on bottom of back bottle label; minor discolouration all over front bottle label; front bottle label separated and creased at bottom; top of box missing; minor discolouration on front of box; major tears in top of box resulting in 6 separate pieces
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Website
Document
Reference Comments
“Tonic.” Cambridge Dictionary. Cambridge University Press, 2019. Accessed 5 June 2019.
Lockhart, Bill et al. “The Dominion Glass Companies of Montreal, Canada.” Society for Historical Archaeology, 2015.
Research Facts
Tonics were used to improve ones general well being and were said to improve many different medical conditions; Dreco was marketed as a treatment for several ailments, including constipation, biliousness, jaundice, and headaches.
The D-in-diamond logo indicates the bottle itself was made by Canadian glass manufacturer Dominion Glass Company; the logo was introduced in 1928 and markings for dates were introduce in 1940; the lack of date marks suggests the bottle was manufactured between 1928 and 1940.
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