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68 records – page 1 of 7.

Dates
1900
1950
circa 1910-1950
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Diagnostic & Treatment Artifacts
Classification
Treatment, General
Accession Number
016001067
Description
One piece semi-transparent deep green glass eye bath cup with deep round reservoir and eye cup is taller on one side to fit the eye better.
  1 image  
Accession Number
016001067
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Diagnostic & Treatment Artifacts
Classification
Treatment, General
MeSH Heading
Eye, Foreign Bodies
Ophthalmology -- instrumentation
Optometry -- instrumentation
MM= Feeding Dish
Description
One piece semi-transparent deep green glass eye bath cup with deep round reservoir and eye cup is taller on one side to fit the eye better.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and Alice Roeder.
Dates
1900
1950
circa 1910-1950
Date Remarks
Internet research
Material
glass: green
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-A4-6 Box 3 Row A
Width
4.4 cm
Height
6.0 cm
Diameter
3.8 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Dimension Notes
diameter at base
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Documents Book eBook Internet
Reference Comments
Bennion, Elisabeth. Antique Medical Instruments. London: Sotheby Parke Bernet Publications by Philip Wilsons Publications, 1979.
Campbell, Gordon. The Grove Encyclopedia of Decorative Arts. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2006. 2006. Accessed August 18, 2016. http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780195189483.001.0001/acref-9780195189483
Donor file
Research Facts
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and sister Alice Roeder, a retired nurse. The large collection was made up of invalid feeders, hot water bottles, and urinals.
Initially in the early 19th century, eye bath cups had a small foot and circular basin to rinse solution in the eye. The shape eventually evolved to become wider and better suited for the eye. These eye baths were usually made out of silver and silver gilt. Later, as they became more popular they began to be mass produced out of glass, which was much cheaper to produce than metals by the mid to late 19th century. The glass was clear, but also could be coloured green, orange, and most commonly cobalt blue. The blue colour in this particular case derives from cobalt ore, and has been used since medieval times to colour glass for stained glass, and even dating back to antiquity was used for ceramics.
Images
Less detail
Dates
1960
circa 1960
Collection
Rockwood / Kingston Psychiatric Hospital / Providence Continuing Care Centre Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Accession Number
000003421
Description
White cup shaped ceramic invalid feeder with half cover with a mustache shaped indent; spout attached on the lower half of the body and curves upwards, like a teapot; without decoration; single open handle at ninety degrees from the spout pointing straight ahead; manufacturing mark stamped on base.
Accession Number
000003421
Collection
Rockwood / Kingston Psychiatric Hospital / Providence Continuing Care Centre Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
MeSH Heading
Feeding Methods
Home Health Nursing
Nursing Care -- instrumentation
MM= Feeding Dish
Description
White cup shaped ceramic invalid feeder with half cover with a mustache shaped indent; spout attached on the lower half of the body and curves upwards, like a teapot; without decoration; single open handle at ninety degrees from the spout pointing straight ahead; manufacturing mark stamped on base.
Number Of Parts
1
Site Made (Country)
England
Dates
1960
circa 1960
Date Remarks
Used in the 1960s
Material
ceramic: white
ink: black
Inscriptions
Stamped on base: "MADE IN // ENGLAND"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D2-8
Length
14.6
Width
12.4
Height
8.7
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Minor wear on bottom, glaze crackling, minor stains on covered area and interior
Copy Type
original
Less detail
Dates
1914
1918
circa 1914-1918
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Accession Number
1982.23.1
Description
A white porcelain hemispherical cup with a loop handle to the right of a curved spout; ogee-edged half cover; there is a red cross outlined in black in overglaze on the half cover. Missing: 18 Sept 2018
  1 image  
Accession Number
1982.23.1
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
MeSH Heading
Feeding Methods
Nursing Care -- instrumentation
MM= Feeding Dish
Description
A white porcelain hemispherical cup with a loop handle to the right of a curved spout; ogee-edged half cover; there is a red cross outlined in black in overglaze on the half cover. Missing: 18 Sept 2018
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Acquired from the Academy of Medicine; source: Dr. R. D. Lane of Toronto.
Site Made (Country)
Austria
Dates
1914
1918
circa 1914-1918
Date Remarks
W.W.I
Material
porcelain: white
ink: red, black
Inscriptions
Maker's mark: "Victoria" over a crown with "Austria" underneath.
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D7-9
Temporary Location
Missing: 18 Sept 2018
Dimension Notes
Length 7.0 cm x Diam. 9.6 cm
Copy Type
Original
Research Facts
This cup was used by Dr. Lane's aunt, E. N. Campbell, who was a nurse Lt. Col. in the RCAMC during World War I. The convex half cover is characteristic of 20th-century invalid cups; the curved spout is more common to the 20th century.
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invalid feeder

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact930
Dates
1930
1950
circa 1930-1950
Collection
Pat Blair Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Treatment, General
Nursing
Accession Number
996020001
Description
Plain white oval ceramic pap boat shaped invalid feeder; open handle with two raised bumps on back with spout pointing straight ahead in line with spout; without manufacturers marks; spout opening is part of body; base partially glazed.
  1 image  
Accession Number
996020001
Collection
Pat Blair Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Treatment, General
Nursing
MeSH Heading
Feeding Methods
Home Health Nursing
MM= Feeding Dish
Nursing Care -- instrumentation
Description
Plain white oval ceramic pap boat shaped invalid feeder; open handle with two raised bumps on back with spout pointing straight ahead in line with spout; without manufacturers marks; spout opening is part of body; base partially glazed.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Owned by Pat Blair, previously owned by her father.
Dates
1930
1950
circa 1930-1950
Material
porcelain: white
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1-
Length
16.3 cm
Width
6.0 cm.
Height
6.0 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Surface crack 2.0 cm long at opening small black dot in glaze on one side near base.
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Person
Document
Images
Less detail
Dates
1930
1950
circa 1930-1950
Collection
Dr. Charles H. Bird / Dr. Godfrey Bird Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Treatment, General
Nursing
Accession Number
997037514
Description
Round white cup style invalid feeder with rounded cover over opening with spout and handle at an angle; undecorated; stamped in green ink in base manufacturer's stamp.
  1 image  
Accession Number
997037514
Collection
Dr. Charles H. Bird / Dr. Godfrey Bird Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Treatment, General
Nursing
MeSH Heading
Feeding Methods
Home Health Nursing
MM= Feeding Dish
Nursing Care -- instrumentation
Description
Round white cup style invalid feeder with rounded cover over opening with spout and handle at an angle; undecorated; stamped in green ink in base manufacturer's stamp.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Owned and used by Dr. Charles H. Bird or Dr. H. Godfrey Bird of Gananoque, Ontario.
Site Made (Country)
Germany
Dates
1930
1950
circa 1930-1950
Material
ceramic: white
Inscriptions
"MADE IN GERMANY"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1-
Length
12.7 cm
Width
11.5 cm
Height
6.0 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Good condition, with a small bubble in the ceramic of the cup wall behind the handle, discoloured in dark brown as if a metal piece was inside the body; the spout has a very small chip from the rim
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Book
Reference Comments
"Aloe's Catalogue of Superior Surgical Instruments," A. S. Aloe Co., 189–, pp. 938 and 939 similar to item # 11006
Research Facts
Invalid feeders’ also known as sick cups are designed to provide liquid or semi solid nourishment in time of illness or incapacity. There are many different shapes for invalid feeders. Some of the shapes are defined as infant or invalid feeders, however it seems that each manufacture used both terms interchangeably depending on the market they are targeting.
Images
Less detail
Dates
1940
1990
circa 1940-1990
Collection
Colonel S. M. Polson Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Treatment, General
Nursing
Accession Number
999021002
Description
Oval ceramic boat shaped invalid feeder; two part handle; handle is in line with the spout; spout opening is part of the body; opening without cover; partially glazed bottom; manufacturing country of origin on base
Accession Number
999021002
Collection
Colonel S. M. Polson Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Treatment, General
Nursing
MeSH Heading
Feeding Methods
Home Health Nursing
MM= Anesthesia, Inhalation -- accessories
MM= Feeding Dish
Nursing Care -- instrumentation
Description
Oval ceramic boat shaped invalid feeder; two part handle; handle is in line with the spout; spout opening is part of the body; opening without cover; partially glazed bottom; manufacturing country of origin on base
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Originally owned and used by Mrs. Nancy C. Polson.
Site Made (Country)
Japan
Dates
1940
1990
circa 1940-1990
Material
ream ceramic: cream ink: green
Inscriptions
Stamped on bottom: "MADE // IN // JAPAN"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1
Length
16.8
Width
6.4
Height
6.2
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Shows wear on the bottom.
Copy Type
original
Research Facts
Invalid feeders’ also known as sick cups are designed to provide liquid or semi solid nourishment in time of illness or incapacity. There are many different shapes for invalid feeders. Some of the shapes are defined as infant or invalid feeders, however it seems that each manufacture used both terms interchangeably depending on the market they are targeting.
Less detail
Dates
1890
1930
1890-1930
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Nursing
Patient Care
Accession Number
1978.24.3
Description
Undecorated cream earthenware spouted invalid feeder with a double ogee-edged flat half cover; handle at direct angle to spout, micro crackle glaze, short and narrow spout; 12.8 cm diameter across top of opening.
  1 image  
Accession Number
1978.24.3
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Nursing
Patient Care
MeSH Heading
MM= Feeding Dish
Feeding Methods
Nursing Care -- instrumentation
Description
Undecorated cream earthenware spouted invalid feeder with a double ogee-edged flat half cover; handle at direct angle to spout, micro crackle glaze, short and narrow spout; 12.8 cm diameter across top of opening.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Acquired from the Academy of Medicine; source: Miss Helen Cronin of Toronto.
Dates
1890
1930
1890-1930
Material
ceramic: cream
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1-
Length
15.6 cm
Width
15.4 cm
Height
7.3 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Minor stains; approx. 3.0 cm long stained crack in centre of base; approx. 4.0 cm long stained crack on side without handle; chip losses from rim of spout
Copy Type
Original
Research Facts
This item came from a drugstore in Northern Ontario (St. Mary's); Miss Cronin's father, an engineer, took over the drugstore in payment of a debt.
Images
Less detail
Dates
1830
1880
circa 1830-1880
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Treatment, General
Nursing
Accession Number
1938.3.1
Description
A ring-shaped hollow porcelain feeding cup with a feeding spout and a funnel-like filling opening; filling funnel is also used as a handle; cobalt blue transferware with Japanese inspired design of waves and birds around circle and small amount on proturbances; curved feeding spout in tea pot style…
  1 image  
Accession Number
1938.3.1
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Treatment, General
Nursing
MeSH Heading
Feeding Methods
Home Nursing
MM= Feeding Dish
Nursing Care -- instrumentation
Description
A ring-shaped hollow porcelain feeding cup with a feeding spout and a funnel-like filling opening; filling funnel is also used as a handle; cobalt blue transferware with Japanese inspired design of waves and birds around circle and small amount on proturbances; curved feeding spout in tea pot style; bottom is unglazed.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Acquired from the Academy of Medicine; donated by Mr. & Mrs. J. C. Carroll through Dr. Maurice Adams.
Site Made (Country)
Japan
Dates
1830
1880
circa 1830-1880
Material
porcelain: white
ink: blue
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1-
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Dimension Notes
Height: 7.0 cm Diameter: 10.5 cm
Condition Remarks
Small chip loss from tip of spout; light soiling on unglazed bottom
Copy Type
Original
Reference Comments
Similar to one in the Mead Johnson & Co. and the Wellcome collections
Research Facts
Considered rare
Exhibit History
On exhibit, Billings Estate, 15 Jan 2009 - 31 Dec. 2009
Images
Less detail
Dates
1870
1900
circa 1870-1900
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Treatment, General
Nursing
Accession Number
016001001
Description
White oval ceramic pap boat shaped invalid feeder decorated with deep blue one piece floral transfer with gilding around perimeter of top opening and spout; transfer print is raised; single open handle on back with spout pointing straight ahead; without manufacturers marks; some design overlap on b…
  1 image  
Accession Number
016001001
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Treatment, General
Nursing
MeSH Heading
Feeding Methods
Home Health Nursing
MM= Anesthesia, Inhalation -- accessories
MM= Feeding Dish
Nursing Care -- instrumentation
Description
White oval ceramic pap boat shaped invalid feeder decorated with deep blue one piece floral transfer with gilding around perimeter of top opening and spout; transfer print is raised; single open handle on back with spout pointing straight ahead; without manufacturers marks; some design overlap on base; spout opening is part of body.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and Alice Roeder.
Dates
1870
1900
circa 1870-1900
Date Remarks
Research
Material
ceramic: white
ink: blue, gold
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1
Length
16.5 cm
Width
6.1 cm
Height
5.3 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Base shows minor cracking under glaze; gold trim is missing in some aras and worn
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Documents
Book
eBook
Internet
Reference Comments
Allison, Eileen Michael. Ceramic Invalid Feeders, Pap Boats, and Baby Bottles of the 19th & Twentieth Century. Canada: E. M. Allison, 1997.
Donor file
Research Facts
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and sister Alice Roeder, a retired nurse. The collection consists of various eras and types of invalid / infant feeders, infant milk bottles, medicine spoons, urinals and reference material.
Invalid feeders’ also known as sick cups are designed to provide liquid or semi solid nourishment in time of illness or incapacity. There are many different shapes for invalid feeders. Some of the shapes are defined as infant or invalid feeders, however it seems that each manufacture used both terms interchangeably depending on the market they are targeting.
Images
Less detail
Dates
1930
1960
circa 1930-1960
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Treatment, General
Nursing
Accession Number
016001002
Description
White oval ceramic pap boat shaped invalid feeder decorated with hand painted deep blue Delft decoration in the 'onion' pattern with gilt trim along opening, one side of handle edge and a pair of lines from opening to spout; single open handle on back with spout pointing straight ahead; without man…
  1 image  
Accession Number
016001002
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Home Health Care
Patient Care Artifacts
Classification
Patient Care
Treatment, General
Nursing
MeSH Heading
Feeding Methods
Home Health Nursing
MM= Anesthesia, Inhalation -- accessories
MM= Feeding Dish
Nursing Care -- instrumentation
Description
White oval ceramic pap boat shaped invalid feeder decorated with hand painted deep blue Delft decoration in the 'onion' pattern with gilt trim along opening, one side of handle edge and a pair of lines from opening to spout; single open handle on back with spout pointing straight ahead; without manufacturers marks; spout opening is part of body; unglazed base.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and Alice Roeder.
Dates
1930
1960
circa 1930-1960
Date Remarks
Research
Material
ceramic: white
ink: blue
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1
Length
18.3 cm
Width
7.2 cm
Height
6.0 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Handle previously broken off and repaired; 2.7 cm crack under glaze at edge of opening
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Documents
Book
eBook
Internet
Reference Comments
Allison, Eileen Michael. Ceramic Invalid Feeders, Pap Boats, and Baby Bottles of the 19th & Twentieth Century. Canada: E.M. Allison, 1997.
Campbell, Gordon. The Grove Encyclopedia of Decorative Arts. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2006. 2006. Accessed August 18, 2016. http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780195189483.001.0001/acref-9780195189483
Patelisova, Helena. "The Layers of a Blue Onion." 3NTA. April 25, 2015. Accessed August 19, 2016. http://www.3nta.com/the-layers-of-a-blue-onion/.
Donor file
Research Facts
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and sister Alice Roeder who was a nurse. The large collection was made up of invalid feeders, hot water bottles, eye washers, bedpans, and female urinals.
Invalid feeders were made for both infants and adults. Originally sold for home health care purposes, they were ornately decorated and gilded, often with transfer prints and gilding. Many of these transfer prints were cheaper to produce and became popular in the 19th century. The most common color is blue, and often the same transfer print patterns can be found on popular dinner sets. All prints were applied to the feeders prior to glazing. These transfer patterns were often not shape specific. The results of general print patterns are overlapping areas or areas where a pattern that was split is showing to accommodate the shape of the feeder. Plain invalid feeders were often white and produced for home health care for the poor. By the late 19th and early 20th century, painting ceramics became a popular pastime for women in United States of America, and England. This influence produced a resurgence in hand painted invalid feeders, and popularity in plain white ceramic feeders. Many of the plain feeders were painted in homes or establishments, and once completed sent back to the manufacturer for firing. These are often identified because of the shade of blue is different and less bright than the shade used in print pattern transfers. The invalid feeders produced after the 19th century that were plain mark the shift of the invalid feeder to a more utilitarian purpose for professional use by nurses in hospitals. There were many manufacturers of invalid feeders marketing similar products for babies and adults. These manufactures would sometimes mark the feeder with a logo, the shape number, pattern number, and where it was made.
There are many different shapes for invalid feeders. Some of the shapes are defined as infant or invalid feeders, however it seems that each manufacture used both terms interchangeably. The boat shaped, which looks very similar to a gravy boat, originally evolved from the pap boat shape. It has a straight spout, main opening in the top, and an open handle in the back.
The design, like other medical ceramic ware, was decorated in the popular Blue Onion or Strawflower designs. The origins of this popular pattern originated from high quality Chinese porcelain decorated in cobalt designs. This tradition of blue and white porcelain dates back to the 8th and 9th centuries. When the wealthy Dutch and European merchants began exporting these wares back to Europe, the Meissen Porcelain Manufacturer began producing inspired blue ware called “onion china”. Many other manufacturers followed suit to produce the highly popular design, and the name evolved to blue onion. Each manufacturer had its own variation of the blue onion design. The original Chinese design was actually a floral design with pomegranates and peaches. These designs were so popular on all types ceramic and porcelain ware, that manufacturers produced transfer pattern outlines to reduce production time.
Majority of the invalid boat feeders produced in the 19th century were ceramic. Ceramics in an ambiguous term as it can signify an artefact made out of multiple kinds of clay, and different firing techniques. Ceramic can also be used to signify clay ware that has been fired at temperatures less then 500 °C. One of the many types of ceramic ware that falls under this umbrella term is porcelain. The term porcelain is incorrectly used interchangeably with ceramics. Porcelain ware is from fine white clay, it is characteristically fired below 1300 °C, and is translucent. In addition, to appearance it is generally very hard, durable, and makes a distinct ringing noise when tapped. Like the term ceramics, there are types of artefacts that fall under the term porcelain, such as fine china and bone china.
Invalid feeders are designed to provide liquid or semi solid nourishment in time of illness or incapacity. There are many different shapes for invalid feeders. Some of the shapes are defined as infant or invalid feeders, however it seems that each manufacture used both terms interchangeably. The boat shaped, which looks very similar to a gravy boat, originally evolved from the pap boat shape. It has a straight spout, main opening in the top, and an open handle in the back. This is also known as an infant feeder prior to the development of baby milk bottles. Manufacturers would market this item as both invalid and infant feeders depending on the market they are targeting.
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68 records – page 1 of 7.