Skip header and navigation

Refine By

   MORE

17 records – page 1 of 2.

Anglo-American Medicine Co. [newspaper advertisement]

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact12805
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Archival Items
Communication
Pharmacy and Drug Artifacts
Business
Ephemera
Classification
Archival Items
Communication
Pharmacy and Drug Artifacts
Business
Ephemera
Accession Number
1977.12.182
Description
A newspaper clipping listing advertisements for various pharmaceuticals; all advertisements were put forth by the Anglo-American Medicine Co.; double sided newspaper print.
Accession Number
1977.12.182
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Archival Items
Communication
Pharmacy and Drug Artifacts
Business
Ephemera
Classification
Archival Items
Communication
Pharmacy and Drug Artifacts
Business
Ephemera
MeSH Heading
Advertising -- ephemera
Description
A newspaper clipping listing advertisements for various pharmaceuticals; all advertisements were put forth by the Anglo-American Medicine Co.; double sided newspaper print.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Acquired from the Academy of Medicine
Material
paper: cream
ink: black
Inscriptions
Printed on clipping: "Secure all Remedies mentioned on this circular from your local // druggist. Should he not have them in stock, they will be sent // direct to you on reciept of price. // ANGLO-AMERICAN MEDICINE CO. // 162 CLINTON ST., TORONTO, CANADA"; pharmaceutical titles include: "Dr. Agnew's Heart Remedy", "DR. VON STAN'S // Pineapple Tablets", "Dr. Agnew's Ointment", "DR. AGNEW'S // LIVER PILLS", "English Spavin Liniment // The Great Blemish Cure", "Woolford's Sanitary Lotion"; on reverse: "The Great South American // Rheumatic Remedy // FOR RHEUMATISM AND NEURALGIA", "The Great South American // NERVINE TONIC // AND STOMACH AND LIVER REMEDY", "The Great South American // KIDNEY REMEDY"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 2005
2005-5-7 Binder A
Dimension Notes
Length 42.0 cm x Width 30.2 cm
Condition Remarks
Paper has yellowed; slight creases throughout; a moderate crease runs horizontally across the centre of page; one moderate crease runs vertically on top half of page
Copy Type
Original
Less detail

bowmeter pulse measuring device

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact11140
Dates
1955
1965
1955-1965
Collection
Dr. Hans Westenberg Collection
Category
Diagnostic & Treatment Artifacts
Classification
Cardiology
Accession Number
005007001
Description
A glass bowmeter (pulse measuring device); the device is a curved tube, sealed at each end; the tube is filled with an amber coloured liquid with a bubble in it; along the tube are a series of black and red dots (one red, four black, one red, four black, one red); there is a string tied on to the d…
  2 images  
Accession Number
005007001
Collection
Dr. Hans Westenberg Collection
Category
Diagnostic & Treatment Artifacts
Classification
Cardiology
MeSH Heading
Physical Examination
Cardiology -- instrumentation
MM= Pulse -- sphygmograph
Description
A glass bowmeter (pulse measuring device); the device is a curved tube, sealed at each end; the tube is filled with an amber coloured liquid with a bubble in it; along the tube are a series of black and red dots (one red, four black, one red, four black, one red); there is a string tied on to the device.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
The donor first used this device during his medical studies at the University of Amsterdam (Universiteit van Amsterdam) in the late 1950s where Prof. J. G. G. Borst was faculty chairman; the donor believes everyone who wished to gradate used one and every clinical clerk, intern, and resident would carry one of these in their pocket with the string tied to a button on their jacket; Dr. Westenberg brought this instrument with him when he came to Canada in 1961 and used it for a while, although he believes this measure may not have been widely used beyond Prof. Borst and his students in Amsterdam.
Maker
Probably custom made at the University of Amsterdam.
Site Made (City)
Amsterdam
Site Made (Country)
Netherlands
Dates
1955
1965
1955-1965
Date Remarks
The donor says these devices were used in the late 1950s, and he brought this one to Canada in 1961 and used it a few years later.
Material
glass: clear
liquid: amber
fabric: beige
Inscriptions
"WESTENBURG" hand printed on a piece of tape on the device
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-E6-7
Dimension Notes
Length 14.2 cm x Diam 1.0 cm
Condition Remarks
Some minor surface wear; the piece of tape is deteriorated.
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Person
Reference Comments
Dr. Hans Westenburg
Research Facts
The donor believes that Prof. J. G. G.Borst (best known for his low protein diet for people in acute renal failure) had these objects made up by one of his technicians; this devices was used to measure the height of a patient's jugular venous pressure; before the development of diuretics in the mid-1960s for patients suffering from renal failure, this instrument was a method of determining whether congestive heart failure was improving or deteriorating - an elevated jugular vein pulse could indicate a backup in the right atrium of the heart; one end was placed on the patient's sternal notch, about 5.0 cm above the right atrium in a person lying down - the other end would be placed on the highest point of the jugular vein in the anterior neck.
Images
Less detail

Dr. Bell's Musical Wonders [leaflet]

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact2911
Dates
Oct. 28 1935
circa Oct. 28 1935
Collection
Dr. Michael A. Chiong Patent Medicine Collection
Category
Archival Items
Classification
Archival, Advertisements
Accession Number
996001874
Description
A paper leaflet advertising Dr. Bell's Musical Wonders daily radio show; front: a picture of the group and dates, times and station; back: lists some of the members of the group.
  2 images  
Accession Number
996001874
Collection
Dr. Michael A. Chiong Patent Medicine Collection
Category
Archival Items
Classification
Archival, Advertisements
MeSH Heading
Commerce -- ephemera
Advertising -- ephemera
Drugs, Non-Prescription, advertisements
Description
A paper leaflet advertising Dr. Bell's Musical Wonders daily radio show; front: a picture of the group and dates, times and station; back: lists some of the members of the group.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Purchased by Dr. Chiong for his patent medicine collection, before July 15, 1995.
Maker
Dr. Bell Wonder Medicine Co.
Site Made (City)
Kingston
Site Made (State)
Ontario
Site Made (Country)
Canada
Dates
Oct. 28 1935
circa Oct. 28 1935
Date Remarks
Probably published shortly before this date
Material
paper: black
Inscriptions
"ON THE AIR // Dr. Bell's Musical Wonders // 690 KILOCYCLES // CFRB // 690 KILOCYCLES // DR. BELL MUSICAL WONDERS // EVERY DAY 12.55 - 1.10 NOON // EXCEPT SATURDAY AND SUNDAY // Commencing October 28th, 1935 // BROUGHT TO YOU BY // DR. BELL WONDER MEDICINE CO. // KINGSTON, ONT. // WINNIPEG, MAN. ALEXANDRIA BAY, N.Y."; back: "ON THE AIR // Dr. Bell's Musical Wonders // Olde Tyme Orchestra ..."; etc.
Permanent Location
Storage Room 2005
2005-5-6 Binder E
Dimension Notes
Length: 18.3 cm. x Width: 11.5 cm.
Condition Remarks
Quite age/sun discoloured; bottom right corner front is missing; creased in several places
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Document
Research Facts
Veterinarian Dr. George W. Bell (1858-1927), graduated from the Ontario Veterinary College 1880; practised veterinary medicine in the U.S. for 13 years. Returning to Kingston he established a veterinarian clinic on Brock Street, and continued to produce his patent medicines for use in farm livestock and pet animals under the business name of ‘Dr. Bell’s Wonder Medicine Company’. Dr. Bell made both veterinary and human remedies.
Dr. Bell’s Wonder Medicine was used as a sort of "cure all" but especially in the treatment of colic and inflammation and for cough and chills. The ingredients were aconite, belladonna, digitalis and nux vomica (strychnine).
He was principal (1895-1897) for the new Kingston Veterinary College at Queen’s University. By 1919 he was the milk inspector.
The operation of Dr. Bell’s Wonder Medicine Company was headed by his son. In 1936 when the United States Food and Drug Administration accused Dr. Bell’s Wonder Medicine Company of “misbranding.” Bottles were seized and analyzed under the Food and Drug Act. Labelled at 40 per cent alcohol, the tests concluded the mixture contained between 63 per cent and 65 per cent per bottle. Legal action ensued. In later years, the once-respected and prosperous company was labelled as quackery.
Images
Less detail

Dr. John W. P. McCullough Chief Health Officer for Ontario [business card]

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact9002
Dates
1900
1930
1900-1930
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Archival Items
Communication
Ephemera
Classification
Archival Items
Communication
Ephemera
Accession Number
82.11.1
Description
A physician's business card in cursive script indicating his government position.
Accession Number
82.11.1
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Archival Items
Communication
Ephemera
Classification
Archival Items
Communication
Ephemera
MeSH Heading
Physicians -- advertisements
Commerce -- ephemera
Advertising -- ephemera
Description
A physician's business card in cursive script indicating his government position.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Acquired from the Academy of Medicine; source: Miss Norah McCullough of Guelph, Ont.
Maker
Dr. John McCullough
Site Made (City)
Toronto
Site Made (State)
Ontario
Site Made (Country)
Canada
Dates
1900
1930
1900-1930
Material
paper: white
ink: black
Inscriptions
"Dr. John W. P. McCullough // Chief Health Officer for Ontario // Toronto" all in cursive script.
Dimension Notes
Length 7.5 cm x Width 4.0 cm
Copy Type
Original
Research Facts
Accepted by the Academy of Medicine on Nov. 29, 1982.
Less detail

Dudgeon's sphygmograph

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact8231
Dates
1860
1900
circa 1860-1900
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Diagnostic & Treatment Artifacts
Military Medicine
Classification
Cardiology
Military Medicine
Accession Number
1982.5.11
Description
A sphygmograph in a leather box lined with velvet and silk; arrow on box lid indicates British military supplies; the numbers 1929 could be the supply order number and not the date.
  1 image  
Accession Number
1982.5.11
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Diagnostic & Treatment Artifacts
Military Medicine
Classification
Cardiology
Military Medicine
MeSH Heading
Physical Examination
Cardiology -- instrumentation
MM= Pulse -- sphygmograph
Military Medicine
Military Medicine -- British
Military Medicine -- War
Description
A sphygmograph in a leather box lined with velvet and silk; arrow on box lid indicates British military supplies; the numbers 1929 could be the supply order number and not the date.
Number Of Parts
2
Part Names
box - Size: Length 8.0 cm x Width 7.0 cm x Depth 5.0 cm
Provenance
Acquired from the Academy of Medicine; source: Dr. J. W. Scott.
Maker
E. Hymans, Surgical Instrument Manufacturers
Site Made (City)
London
Site Made (Country)
England
Dates
1860
1900
circa 1860-1900
Material
metal: silver
leather: black
fabric: blue
paint: yellow
Inscriptions
Marked in gold on lid: "19 [upward arrow] 29"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-E6-7
Condition Remarks
Box has many wormholes
Copy Type
Original
Reference Comments
http://broughttolife.sciencemuseum.org.uk/broughttolife/objects/display?id=92214
Research Facts
Blood pressure is measured and recorded using a sphygmograph. It is strapped to the wrist. The pulse beat is transmitted to a lever which records it on smoked paper. The first efficient sphygmograph was designed by Étienne-Jules Marey (1830-1904) in 1863. This example belonged to Dr Robert Ellis Dudgeon (1820-1904). He was a prominent figure in homeopathy. Dudgeon also made his own changes to Marey’s original design. It was made by instrument maker J. Gauter in 1876. In the late 1800s, physiology teachers used sphygmographs to visually demonstrate blood pressure. Instruments such as this were also valuable diagnostic aids. They were the predecessor of the modern arm cuffs physicians now use to measure blood pressure.
Images
Less detail

Dudgeon's sphygmograph

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact6724
Dates
1860
1900
circa 1860-1900
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Diagnostic & Treatment Artifacts
Classification
Cardiology
Accession Number
1975.2.2
Description
Sphygmograph has a cloth band, a metal box, and a dial; a toggle switch protrudes from the top of the box; a knob at the back right-hand side has an ivory (?) inlay.
  1 image  
Accession Number
1975.2.2
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Diagnostic & Treatment Artifacts
Classification
Cardiology
MeSH Heading
Physical Examination
Cardiology -- instrumentation
MM= Pulse -- sphygmograph
Description
Sphygmograph has a cloth band, a metal box, and a dial; a toggle switch protrudes from the top of the box; a knob at the back right-hand side has an ivory (?) inlay.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Acquired from the Academy of Medicine; source: estate of Mr. Campbell R. M. Cowan of Islington, Ont.
Maker
C. C. & S.
Site Made (Country)
United States of America
Dates
1860
1900
circa 1860-1900
Material
fabric: black
metal: silver
ivory (?): cream
Inscriptions
On ivory-inlaid knob: "Troy"; inscribed on inside of top portion is "1670"; just below that is: "C. C. & S."; dial has calibrations.
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-E6-7
Dimension Notes
Length 5.7 cm x Width 4.4 cm x Depth 7.1 cm
Condition Remarks
Not fully operative
Copy Type
Original
Reference Comments
http://broughttolife.sciencemuseum.org.uk/broughttolife/objects/display?id=92214
Research Facts
Blood pressure is measured and recorded using a sphygmograph. It is strapped to the wrist. The pulse beat is transmitted to a lever which records it on smoked paper. The first efficient sphygmograph was designed by Étienne-Jules Marey (1830-1904) in 1863. This example belonged to Dr Robert Ellis Dudgeon (1820-1904). He was a prominent figure in homeopathy. Dudgeon also made his own changes to Marey’s original design. It was made by instrument maker J. Gauter in 1876. In the late 1800s, physiology teachers used sphygmographs to visually demonstrate blood pressure. Instruments such as this were also valuable diagnostic aids. They were the predecessor of the modern arm cuffs physicians now use to measure blood pressure.
Images
Less detail

Dudgeon's sphygmograph

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact5818
Dates
1860
1900
circa 1860-1900
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Diagnostic & Treatment Artifacts
Classification
Cardiology
Accession Number
1969.214.1
Description
Metal box-like instrument for recording pulse.
  1 image  
Accession Number
1969.214.1
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Diagnostic & Treatment Artifacts
Classification
Cardiology
MeSH Heading
Physical Examination
Cardiology -- instrumentation
MM= Pulse -- sphygmograph
Description
Metal box-like instrument for recording pulse.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Acquired from the Academy of Medicine; source unknown.
Dates
1860
1900
circa 1860-1900
Material
metal: grey
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-E6-7
Dimension Notes
Length 5.5 cm x Width 3.7 cm x Depth 6.3 cm
Condition Remarks
Wrist strap is missing
Copy Type
Original
Reference Comments
http://broughttolife.sciencemuseum.org.uk/broughttolife/objects/display?id=92214
Research Facts
Blood pressure is measured and recorded using a sphygmograph. It is strapped to the wrist. The pulse beat is transmitted to a lever which records it on smoked paper. The first efficient sphygmograph was designed by Étienne-Jules Marey (1830-1904) in 1863. This example belonged to Dr Robert Ellis Dudgeon (1820-1904). He was a prominent figure in homeopathy. Dudgeon also made his own changes to Marey’s original design. It was made by instrument maker J. Gauter in 1876. In the late 1800s, physiology teachers used sphygmographs to visually demonstrate blood pressure. Instruments such as this were also valuable diagnostic aids. They were the predecessor of the modern arm cuffs physicians now use to measure blood pressure.
Images
Less detail

Dudgeon's sphygmograph

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact6181
Dates
1860
1900
circa 1860-1900
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Diagnostic & Treatment Artifacts
Classification
Cardiology
Accession Number
1969.510.1 a-b
Description
Sphygmograph contained in a rectangular box lined with velvet; the interior of the lid has material covering the underside.
  1 image  
Accession Number
1969.510.1 a-b
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Diagnostic & Treatment Artifacts
Classification
Cardiology
MeSH Heading
Physical Examination
Cardiology -- instrumentation
MM= Pulse -- sphygmograph
Description
Sphygmograph contained in a rectangular box lined with velvet; the interior of the lid has material covering the underside.
Number Of Parts
2
Part Names
a - sphygmograph - Size: Length 5.8 cm x Width 3.8 cm x Depth 5.7 cm
b - case - Size: Length 7.6 cm x Width 7.0 cm x Depth 4.6 cm
Provenance
Acquired from the Academy of Medicine; source: Dr. E.J. Noble via Dr. W.B. Spaulding.
Dates
1860
1900
circa 1860-1900
Material
wood: brown
metal: silver
fabric: royal blue
Inscriptions
On one of the sphygmograph knobs: "TROY"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-E6-7
Copy Type
Original
Reference Comments
http://broughttolife.sciencemuseum.org.uk/broughttolife/objects/display?id=92214
Research Facts
Blood pressure is measured and recorded using a sphygmograph. It is strapped to the wrist. The pulse beat is transmitted to a lever which records it on smoked paper. The first efficient sphygmograph was designed by Étienne-Jules Marey (1830-1904) in 1863. This example belonged to Dr Robert Ellis Dudgeon (1820-1904). He was a prominent figure in homeopathy. Dudgeon also made his own changes to Marey’s original design. It was made by instrument maker J. Gauter in 1876. In the late 1800s, physiology teachers used sphygmographs to visually demonstrate blood pressure. Instruments such as this were also valuable diagnostic aids. They were the predecessor of the modern arm cuffs physicians now use to measure blood pressure.
Similar to the one used by Sir James Mackenzie in his classic investigations."
Images
Less detail

George W. Bell, N.S., D.V.D.S. [business card]

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact2909
Dates
1915
1925
circa 1915-1925
Collection
Dr. Michael A. Chiong Patent Medicine Collection
Category
Archival Items
Communication
Business
Ephemera
Classification
Archival Items
Communication
Business
Ephemera
Accession Number
996001872
Description
A paper business card for George W. Bell, N.S. D.V.D.S.; front: gives "degrees" and location; back: handwritten in pencil are a number of names.
  2 images  
Accession Number
996001872
Collection
Dr. Michael A. Chiong Patent Medicine Collection
Category
Archival Items
Communication
Business
Ephemera
Classification
Archival Items
Communication
Business
Ephemera
MeSH Heading
Commerce -- ephemera
Advertising -- ephemera
Description
A paper business card for George W. Bell, N.S. D.V.D.S.; front: gives "degrees" and location; back: handwritten in pencil are a number of names.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Purchased by Dr. Chiong for his patent medicine collection, before July 15, 1995.
Maker
George W. Bell, N.S. D.V.D.S.
Site Made (City)
Kingston
Site Made (State)
Ontario
Site Made (Country)
Canada
Dates
1915
1925
circa 1915-1925
Date Remarks
Milk inspector in 1919-1920
Material
paper: black
Inscriptions
"TELEPHONE 514. // CONSULTATION AND ADVICE FREE OF CHARGE. // GEO. W. BELL, N.S. D.V.D.S. // MEMBER U.S.V.M.S., AND P.V.M.S. // Late Special Student of Prof. J.A. Going, M.R.C.V.S., // New York City // GOVERNMENT VETERINARY INSPECTOR. // KINGSTON VETERINARY HOSPITAL AND DISPENSARY // Office: 70 = 72 Princess St., = Kingston. // (Opposite News Office)"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 2005
2005-5-6 Binder E
Dimension Notes
Length: 13.0 cm. x Width: 6.7 cm.
Condition Remarks
Very age/sun discoloured; left edge is stained and another stain is in the middle
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Document
Research Facts
Veterinarian Dr. George W. Bell (1858-1927), graduated from the Ontario Veterinary College 1880; practised veterinary medicine in the U.S. for 13 years. Returning to Kingston he established a veterinarian clinic on Brock Street, and continued to produce his patent medicines for use in farm livestock and pet animals under the business name of ‘Dr. Bell’s Wonder Medicine Company’. Dr. Bell made both veterinary and human remedies.
Dr. Bell’s Wonder Medicine was used as a sort of "cure all" but especially in the treatment of colic and inflammation and for cough and chills. The ingredients were aconite, belladonna, digitalis and nux vomica (strychnine).
He was principal (1895-1897) for the new Kingston Veterinary College at Queen’s University. By 1919 he was the milk inspector.
The operation of Dr. Bell’s Wonder Medicine Company was headed by his son. In 1936 when the United States Food and Drug Administration accused Dr. Bell’s Wonder Medicine Company of “misbranding.” Bottles were seized and analyzed under the Food and Drug Act. Labelled at 40 per cent alcohol, the tests concluded the mixture contained between 63 per cent and 65 per cent per bottle. Legal action ensued. In later years, the once-respected and prosperous company was labelled as quackery.
Images
Less detail

George W. Bell, N.S. D.V.D.S. [business card]

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact2910
Dates
1915
1925
circa 1915-1925
Collection
Dr. Michael A. Chiong Patent Medicine Collection
Category
Archival Items
Communication
Business
Ephemera
Classification
Archival Items
Communication
Business
Ephemera
Accession Number
996001873
Description
A paper business card for George W. Bell, N.S. D.V.D.S.; front: gives "degrees" and location; back: handwritten in pencil are a number of names (as in 996.001.872; but the names are different on this card).
  2 images  
Accession Number
996001873
Collection
Dr. Michael A. Chiong Patent Medicine Collection
Category
Archival Items
Communication
Business
Ephemera
Classification
Archival Items
Communication
Business
Ephemera
MeSH Heading
Commerce -- ephemera
Advertising -- ephemera
Description
A paper business card for George W. Bell, N.S. D.V.D.S.; front: gives "degrees" and location; back: handwritten in pencil are a number of names (as in 996.001.872; but the names are different on this card).
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Purchased by Dr. Chiong for his patent medicine collection, before July 15, 1995.
Maker
George W. Bell, N.S. D.V.D.S.
Site Made (City)
Kingston
Site Made (State)
Ontario
Site Made (Country)
Canada
Dates
1915
1925
circa 1915-1925
Date Remarks
Milk inspector in 1919-1920
Material
paper: black
Inscriptions
"TELEPHONE 514. // CONSULTATION AND ADVICE FREE OF CHARGE. // GEO. W. BELL, N.S. D.V.D.S. // MEMBER U.S.V.M.S., AND P.V.M.S. // Late Special Student of Prof. J.A. Going, M.R.C.V.S., // New York City // GOVERNMENT VETERINARY INSPECTOR. // KINGSTON VETERINARY HOSPITAL AND DISPENSARY // Office: 70 = 72 Princess St., = Kingston. // (Opposite News Office)"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 2005
2005-5-6 Binder E
Dimension Notes
Length: 13.0 cm. x Width: 6.7 cm.
Condition Remarks
Very age/sun discoloured; stain upper left corner
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Document
Research Facts
Veterinarian Dr. George W. Bell (1858-1927), graduated from the Ontario Veterinary College 1880; practised veterinary medicine in the U.S. for 13 years. Returning to Kingston he established a veterinarian clinic on Brock Street, and continued to produce his patent medicines for use in farm livestock and pet animals under the business name of ‘Dr. Bell’s Wonder Medicine Company’. Dr. Bell made both veterinary and human remedies.
Dr. Bell’s Wonder Medicine was used as a sort of "cure all" but especially in the treatment of colic and inflammation and for cough and chills. The ingredients were aconite, belladonna, digitalis and nux vomica (strychnine).
He was principal (1895-1897) for the new Kingston Veterinary College at Queen’s University. By 1919 he was the milk inspector.
The operation of Dr. Bell’s Wonder Medicine Company was headed by his son. In 1936 when the United States Food and Drug Administration accused Dr. Bell’s Wonder Medicine Company of “misbranding.” Bottles were seized and analyzed under the Food and Drug Act. Labelled at 40 per cent alcohol, the tests concluded the mixture contained between 63 per cent and 65 per cent per bottle. Legal action ensued. In later years, the once-respected and prosperous company was labelled as quackery.
Images
Less detail

17 records – page 1 of 2.