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baby bottle sterilizer kit

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact8478
Dates
1965
1975
circa 1965-1970
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Pediatrics
Hygiene
Classification
Pediatrics
Paediatrics
Hygiene
Accession Number
1987.9.1 a-gg
Description
Baby bottle sterilizer kit with yellow plastic base (a) with heating / sterilizing element with two prong electric cord and white plastic cover (b); white plastic grid style bottle rack (c) can hold up to eight (8) bottles (e-k) has a separate grid (d) to fit over top of rack handle for bottle caps…
  5 images  
Accession Number
1987.9.1 a-gg
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Pediatrics
Hygiene
Classification
Pediatrics
Paediatrics
Hygiene
MeSH Heading
Sterilization
Infant Food
Infant Nutrition
Description
Baby bottle sterilizer kit with yellow plastic base (a) with heating / sterilizing element with two prong electric cord and white plastic cover (b); white plastic grid style bottle rack (c) can hold up to eight (8) bottles (e-k) has a separate grid (d) to fit over top of rack handle for bottle caps (l-u), liners and nipples (dd-ff) to be sterilized; kit contains seven (7) transparent Curity brand glass baby bottles with ten (10) cream plastic screw on bottle caps, eight (8) cream and yellow plastic cap seals and three (3) dark brown rubber bottle nipples; white plastic cover fits on base; instructions for use on underside of base; paper instruction manual (gg); Note: instruction manual missing 15 Nov 2016; one bottle and five nipples missing to create a full set.
Number Of Parts
26
Part Names
a – base
b – cover
c – bottle rack
d – accessories rack
e-k – bottle
l-u –cap
v-cc –cap seal
dd-ff - niple
gg - instruction manual
Provenance
Acquired from the Academy of Medicine; source: Mrs. W. T. W. Clarke.
Maker
Hankscraft (Canada) Ltd.
Site Made (City)
Toronto
Site Made (State)
Ontario
Site Made (Country)
Canada
Dates
1965
1975
circa 1965-1970
Material
plastic: yellow; white
glass: transparent
rubber: brown
paper: white
ink: black; red; blue
Inscriptions
On top of case: "HANKSCRAFT"; embossed on bottles: "CURITY // SURE GRIP // CUBIC CENTIMETERS 50 100 250 200 227 // OUNCES 1-8"; embossed on bottle lids and liners "Curity"; on bottom of base unit: "HANKSCRAFT // Model 972 AUTOMATIC ELECTRIC // STERILIZER // 1. POUR WATER (TERMINAL METHOD - 6 OZS., REGULAR ME- // THOD 8 OZS.) INTO EITHER END OF BOILING SECTION MAR- // KED "FILL HERE". PLACE LOADED BOTTLE RACK IN BASE. PUT ON COVER, AND PLUG INTO ELECTRICAL OUTLET. CUR- // RENT WILL SHUT OFF AUTOMATICALLY WHEN ALL WATER // HAS TURNED TO STEAM. (TIME WILL VARY ACCORDING TO // WATER HARDNESS.) TWENTY MINUTES ENSURES COMPLETE // TERMINAL STERILIZATION. IF CURRENT SHUTS OFF IN LESS // THAN TWENTY MINUTES USE 1 OZ. MORE WATER. (IF YOUR // UNIT DOES NOT SHUT OFF IN 45 MINUTES, ADD A SMALL // PINCH OF BAKING SODA. ALLOW ANOTHER HOUR FOR // COOLING AFTER STERILIZER HAS SHUT OFF. // 2. DISCONNECT FROM CIRCUIT, AND REMOVE THE COVER. FOR // SAFE STORAGE, PLACE BOTTLE RACK AND FEEDINGS IN // REFRIGERATOR. // 3. RINSE BOILING SECTION UNDER TAP AFTER EACH USE // 115 VOLTS A.C. ONLY // 7.5 AMPS OR LESS // MADE IN CANADA BY // HANKSCRAFT (CANADA) LTD. TORONTO // CANADIAN PATENT NO. 765,151 U.S. PATENT NO. 3,347,618"; on nipples: "PYRAMID RUBBER CO. RAVENNA. O. EVENFLO PAT. U. S. & CAN.; "EVENFLO PRODUCTS RAVENNA. O. PAT. U. S. & CAN. MADE IN U.S.A."; printed on instruction manual: "baby bottle // STERILIZER"; line drawing of steriliizer.
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0007
0007-N1-6
Storage Room 2005 (gg)
2005-2-3 Box 10 (gg)
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Dimension Notes
a – base – Length 33.0 cm x Width 16.5 cm x Depth 9.0 cm
b – cover – Length 33.0 cm x Width 15.8 cm x Depth 22.2 cm
c – bottle rack – Length 26.0 cm x Width 13.2 cm x Depth 22.8 cm
d – accessories rack – Length 23.2 cm x Width 11.6 cm Depth 2.5 cm
e-k – bottle – Length 16.2 cm x Width 5.0 cm x Depth 5.0 cm
l-u – cap - Diam. 4.6 cm
v-cc – cap seal - Diam. 3.8 cm
dd-ff – nipple - Diam. 3.8 cm
gg - instruction manual
Condition Remarks
#2: rubber cord is brittle
Copy Type
Original
Reference Comments
https://patentimages.storage.googleapis.com/pages/US3347618-0.png
Research Facts
Bought by the donor to sterilize bottles for visiting grandchildren.
Citing patent: US3347618; Filing date: Apr 6, 1964; Publication date: Oct 17, 1967; Applicant: Hankscraft Canada Ltd; Title: Sterilizer.
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Tuffy baby feeding bottle

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact14649
Dates
1910
1925
circa 1910 - 1925
Collection
Vechter Collection
Category
Pediatrics
Classification
Pharmacy, Other
Accession Number
014005008
Description
Translucent blue glass cylindrical bottle with two flat faces; without closure or feeding nipple; mould lines visible.
  3 images  
Accession Number
014005008
Collection
Vechter Collection
Category
Pediatrics
Classification
Pharmacy, Other
MeSH Heading
MM= Bottle Feeding -- bottle
Bottle Feeding -- instrumentation
Description
Translucent blue glass cylindrical bottle with two flat faces; without closure or feeding nipple; mould lines visible.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Items belonged to donor, a physician from Ottawa.
Maker
Brockway
Site Made (City)
Brockwayville
Site Made (State)
Pennsylvania
Site Made (Country)
United States of America
Dates
1910
1925
circa 1910 - 1925
Date Remarks
Online research
Material
glass: translucent blue
Inscriptions
Embossed on bottle, two faces have different measurement lines with labelled values, on another face: "COLD-PROOF" on another face: "HEAT-PROOF" on the other two faces: "TUFFY"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-A3-9 Row B
Length
16.7
Width
5.9
Depth
4.5
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Minor scratches on exterior of bottle by the one ounce line
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Internet
Reference Comments
Brockway Machine Bottle Co. and Brockway Glass Co. Society for Historical Archaeology
Research Facts
From its opening in 1907, the Brockway Machine Bottle Co. was a product of the mechanized era. As the name implies, the company was formed to manufacture bottles by machine.
Initially, of course, Brockway only made wide-mouth bottles by semiautomatic machines, but the plant installed narrow-mouth machines in the early 1920's.
Brockway became one of the leading bottle producers in the U.S. and finally merged with the Owens-Illinois Glass Co. in 1988.
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How to Name the Baby [advertising booklet]

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact13074
Dates
1880
1890
circa 1880-1890
Collection
London Regional Children's Museum Collection
Category
Archival Items
Classification
Archival, Advertisements
Accession Number
006037001
Description
Advertising booklet; 32-page softcover booklet with sewn binding; white pages printed with black ink; title and drawing of a baby holding a rattle on front; list of girls' and boys' names with descriptive words beside them inside, interspersed with articles advertising a variety of medical remedies…
  3 images  
Accession Number
006037001
Collection
London Regional Children's Museum Collection
Category
Archival Items
Classification
Archival, Advertisements
MeSH Heading
Drugs, Non-Prescription, advertisements
Description
Advertising booklet; 32-page softcover booklet with sewn binding; white pages printed with black ink; title and drawing of a baby holding a rattle on front; list of girls' and boys' names with descriptive words beside them inside, interspersed with articles advertising a variety of medical remedies, including Dr. Fowler's Extract of Wild Strawberry, Hagyard's Yellow Oil and Pectoral Balsam, National Pills, and Freeman's Anthelmintic Worm Powders; includes poems, songs and stories related to the medicines and letters from happy customers; advertisement for Burdock Blood Bitters, with manufacturer and address on back
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Acquired from the London Regional Children's Museum, London, Ontario
Maker
T. Milburn & Co
Site Made (City)
Toronto
Site Made (State)
Ontario
Site Made (Country)
Canada
Dates
1880
1890
circa 1880-1890
Date Remarks
Dates printed in artefact
Material
paper: white
ink: black
Inscriptions
(a) Printed on front: "HOW TO NAME // THE // BABY"; printed on back: "Multum in Parbo. // THE CLIMAX OF MEDICAL DISCOVERY // Burdock Blood Bitters. // THE GREAT BLOOD PURIFIER, // System Renovator and Tonic. // CURES ALL DISEASES OF THE BLOOD, LIVER AND KIDNEYS. // RESTORES AND BUILDS UP THE SYSTEM WHEN BROKEN DOWN // AND DEBILITATED BY DISEASE. // For Sale by all Druggists and Dealers. // PRICE ONE DOLLAR PER BOTTLE. // T. MILBURN & CO., // 31 Church Street, - - Toronto. // GENERAL AGENTS."
Permanent Location
Storage Room 2005
2005-2-5 Box 20
Dimension Notes
Length 18.0 cm x Width 12.0 cm x Depth 0.2 cm
Condition Remarks
Cover is yellowed with some brown marks; paper worn at binding
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
JPG
Reference Comments
CD #8
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infant feeding bottle

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact5371
Dates
1800
1850
circa 1800-1850
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Pediatrics
Home Health Care
Classification
Pediatrics
Paediatrics
Home Health Care
Accession Number
1934.24.1
Description
Clear handblown glass bottle; narrow submarine shape with hole in mid-section, flat at one end and glass shaped into nipple and flange at opposite end; rough pontil mark; wide, slightly uneven standing lip around hole in mid-section.
  3 images  
Accession Number
1934.24.1
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Pediatrics
Home Health Care
Classification
Pediatrics
Paediatrics
Home Health Care
MeSH Heading
Infant Food
Infant Nutrition
Bottle Feeding -- instrumentation
MM= Bottle Feeding -- bottle
Pediatrics -- instrumentation
Feeding Methods
Description
Clear handblown glass bottle; narrow submarine shape with hole in mid-section, flat at one end and glass shaped into nipple and flange at opposite end; rough pontil mark; wide, slightly uneven standing lip around hole in mid-section.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Acquired from the Academy of Medicine; donated by Dr. R. W. Schnarr.
Dates
1800
1850
circa 1800-1850
Material
glass: transparent
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1-
Length
22.3 cm
Width
6.8 cm
Depth
4.0 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Dec. 6, 2016: light wear; some cloudy areas on interior
Copy Type
Original
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infant feeding bottle

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact14436
Dates
1900
1920
circa 1900-1920
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Pediatrics
Home Health Care
Classification
Pediatrics
Paediatrics
Home Health Care
Accession Number
016001062
Description
Clear glass torpedo boat shaped feeding or infant bottle with cork stuck in raised thick circular opening; one closed squared off end and small narrow opening to affix a rubber teat; missing teat; micro bubbles visable in glass with several larger bubbles.
  1 image  
Accession Number
016001062
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Pediatrics
Home Health Care
Classification
Pediatrics
Paediatrics
Home Health Care
MeSH Heading
Nursing Care
Nursing Care -- instrumentation
Food, Formulated
Infant Care
Infant Nutrition
Description
Clear glass torpedo boat shaped feeding or infant bottle with cork stuck in raised thick circular opening; one closed squared off end and small narrow opening to affix a rubber teat; missing teat; micro bubbles visable in glass with several larger bubbles.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and Alice Roeder.
Dates
1900
1920
circa 1900-1920
Material
glass: transparent
cork: tan
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-B3
Length
22.3 cm
Width
7.3 cm
Height
6.4 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Cork dried out and stuck fast in opening
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Documents Book
Reference Comments
Allison, Eileen Michael. Ceramic Invalid Feeders, Pap Boats, and Baby Bottles of the 19th & Twentieth Century. Canada: E.M. Allison, 1997. "Down Bros. Ltd. Catalogue of Surgical Instruments & Appliances" by Down Bros. Ltd., London, 1906, p. 1363 similar to item #6031 Donor file
Research Facts
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and sister Alice Roeder, a retired nurse. The collection consists of various eras and types of invalid / infant feeders, infant milk bottles, medicine spoons, urinals and reference material.
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infant feeding bottle

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact934
Dates
1880
1900
circa 1880-1900
Collection
Pat Blair Collection
Category
Pediatrics
Home Health Care
Classification
Pediatrics
Paediatrics
Home Health Care
Accession Number
996020005
Description
Ttriangluar shaped moulded glass nursing bottle with flat bottom and tooled lip; narrow circular opening at the top for cork closure, missing cork; sides slope downwards and outwards, giving the bottle a bulging triangular shape; faint purplish tinge to glass; mould lines along sides visible; one s…
  3 images  
Accession Number
996020005
Collection
Pat Blair Collection
Category
Pediatrics
Home Health Care
Classification
Pediatrics
Paediatrics
Home Health Care
MeSH Heading
Feeding Methods
Infant Food
Infant Nutrition
MM= Bottle Feeding -- bottle
Pediatrics -- instrumentation
Bottle Feeding -- instrumentation
Description
Ttriangluar shaped moulded glass nursing bottle with flat bottom and tooled lip; narrow circular opening at the top for cork closure, missing cork; sides slope downwards and outwards, giving the bottle a bulging triangular shape; faint purplish tinge to glass; mould lines along sides visible; one side of the bottle has an embossed graduated scale with a vertical line and 16 horizontal lines; the numbers 8 (at the top) down to one at the base are spaced out between the horizontal lines, and the word "OUNCES" beneath the opening; embossed on back enclosed within a circle and the name "THE STERLING".
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Owned by Pat Blair and obtained from father.
Dates
1880
1900
circa 1880-1900
Material
glass: transparent
Inscriptions
Embossed on top: "THE STERLING // OUNCES"; embossed on bottom: "557"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1-
Length
13.7 cm
Width
9.1 cm
Depth
5.6 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Jan. 27, 2004: glass cloudy, occluded in places; some nicks; 1996: no chips, cracks or wear.
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Person
Document
Reference Comments
Pat Blair; Sears & Roebuck Co. Catalogue 1897
Research Facts
Sears & Roebuck Co. 1897 Catalogue
Exhibit History
On exhibit in Paediatric case at Museum; Nov. 21 1997
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infant feeding bottle

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact8568
Dates
1890
1920
circa 1890-1920
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Pediatrics
Home Health Care
Classification
Pediatrics
Paediatrics
Home Health Care
Accession Number
1991.14.1
Description
Glass infant feeding bottle known as the Beacon feeding bottle; moulded in the 'turtle' shape of an oval with a raised, spouted neck extending from one end and another opening at the back and flat back to stand flat; graduated measures along front centre, visible mould lines along sides embossed te…
  1 image  
Accession Number
1991.14.1
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Pediatrics
Home Health Care
Classification
Pediatrics
Paediatrics
Home Health Care
MeSH Heading
Feeding Methods
Infant Food
Infant Nutrition
Bottle Feeding -- instrumentation
Pediatrics -- instrumentation
MM= Bottle Feeding -- bottle
Description
Glass infant feeding bottle known as the Beacon feeding bottle; moulded in the 'turtle' shape of an oval with a raised, spouted neck extending from one end and another opening at the back and flat back to stand flat; graduated measures along front centre, visible mould lines along sides embossed text of measurements and name of product.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Acquired from the Academy of Medicine; source: Ontario Medical Association, via Jane Buzza.
Dates
1890
1920
circa 1890-1920
Material
glass: transparent
Inscriptions
Embossed: "FLUID OUNCES // THE BEACON // STERILIZABLE FEEDING BOTTLE"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1-
Length
17.2 cm
Width
8.6 cm
Depth
6.0 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Book
Reference Comments
"A Guide to American Nursing Bottles" (similar to #69, "The Best")
Research Facts
From the archives of the Ontario Medical Association.
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infant feeding bottle

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact6231
Dates
1830
1870
circa 1830-1870
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Pediatrics
Home Health Care
Classification
Pediatrics
Paediatrics
Home Health Care
Accession Number
1969.73.1
Description
Hand-blown clear glass infant feeding bottle with a tapered neck and a hole in one side; shaped like a cylindrical bottle with flat base, very small opening at top and large lipped opening on front; rough pontil mark on flat base; lots of mini seed bubbles in glass; wide lips around both openings.
  2 images  
Accession Number
1969.73.1
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Pediatrics
Home Health Care
Classification
Pediatrics
Paediatrics
Home Health Care
MeSH Heading
Infant Food
Infant Nutrition
Bottle Feeding -- instrumentation
MM= Bottle Feeding -- bottle
Pediatrics -- instrumentation
Feeding Methods
Description
Hand-blown clear glass infant feeding bottle with a tapered neck and a hole in one side; shaped like a cylindrical bottle with flat base, very small opening at top and large lipped opening on front; rough pontil mark on flat base; lots of mini seed bubbles in glass; wide lips around both openings.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Acquired from the Academy of Medicine.
Dates
1830
1870
circa 1830-1870
Material
glass: transparent
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1-
Length
14.5 cm
Diameter
6.3 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Cracking on the neck; air bubbles in the glass; cracking on the side vent; abrasions adjacent to the side vent; wear on base.
Copy Type
Original
Images
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infant feeding bottle

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact6232
Dates
1800
1850
circa 1800-1850
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Pediatrics
Home Health Care
Classification
Pediatrics
Paediatrics
Home Health Care
Accession Number
1969.74.1
Description
"Whale-shaped" hand blown-glass infant feeding bottle rests on a flat side; neck tapers and curves upwards to a small opening with a narrow lip; standing hole with a lip is on the top side; looks like a long tear drop with tip raised up and opposite end is flat.
  3 images  
Accession Number
1969.74.1
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Pediatrics
Home Health Care
Classification
Pediatrics
Paediatrics
Home Health Care
MeSH Heading
Infant Food
Infant Nutrition
Bottle Feeding -- instrumentation
MM= Bottle Feeding -- bottle
Pediatrics -- instrumentation
Feeding Methods
Description
"Whale-shaped" hand blown-glass infant feeding bottle rests on a flat side; neck tapers and curves upwards to a small opening with a narrow lip; standing hole with a lip is on the top side; looks like a long tear drop with tip raised up and opposite end is flat.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Acquired from the Academy of Medicine; source unknown.
Dates
1800
1850
circa 1800-1850
Material
glass: transparent
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1-
Length
21.0 cm
Width
8.0 cm
Depth
6.0 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Bottom is scratched; interior is stained: one more noticeable oval cloudy stain adjacent to larger opening ; some minor cracks under hole.
Copy Type
Original
Images
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infant feeding bottle

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact6233
Dates
1830
1860
circa 1830-1860
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Pediatrics
Home Health Care
Classification
Pediatrics
Paediatrics
Home Health Care
Accession Number
1969.75.1
Description
Oval-shaped hand-blown glass infant feeding bottle rests on one flat side; small opening / spout at one end with a rounded lip and opposite with flat end; cream cotton cloth cover with linen string wrapped tightly over fabric closure over this opening; larger standing opening with wide lip on top; …
  3 images  
Accession Number
1969.75.1
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Pediatrics
Home Health Care
Classification
Pediatrics
Paediatrics
Home Health Care
MeSH Heading
Bottle Feeding -- instrumentation
Feeding Methods
Infant Food
Infant Nutrition
Pediatrics -- instrumentation
MM= Bottle Feeding -- bottle
Description
Oval-shaped hand-blown glass infant feeding bottle rests on one flat side; small opening / spout at one end with a rounded lip and opposite with flat end; cream cotton cloth cover with linen string wrapped tightly over fabric closure over this opening; larger standing opening with wide lip on top; slightly rough pontil at end opposite spout.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Acquired from the Academy of Medicine.
Dates
1830
1860
circa 1830-1860
Material
glass: transparent
fabric: cream
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1-
Length
18.0 cm
Width
9.8 cm
Depth
5.5 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Abrasions and scratches on bottom; small bubble adjacent to large opening on top; rough edges on inside of lip around large opening; one rough area on outside edge of this lip
Copy Type
Original
Research Facts
Fabric and string covering are not original, but added for demonstration purposes.
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infant feeding bottle

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact14442
Dates
1880
1910
circa 1880-1910
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Pediatrics
Home Health Care
Classification
Pediatrics
Paediatrics
Home Health Care
Accession Number
016001058
Description
Clear glass 'turtle' shaped infant feeding bottle with rounded bottom and angled neck for cork or rubber teat closure; visible mould line around edges; hand blown glass; front flat area with embossed measurement gradations on front.
  1 image  
Accession Number
016001058
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Pediatrics
Home Health Care
Classification
Pediatrics
Paediatrics
Home Health Care
MeSH Heading
Pediatrics
Infant Care
Infant Food
Nursing Care
Nursing Care -- instrumentation
Description
Clear glass 'turtle' shaped infant feeding bottle with rounded bottom and angled neck for cork or rubber teat closure; visible mould line around edges; hand blown glass; front flat area with embossed measurement gradations on front.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and Alice Roeder.
Dates
1880
1910
circa 1880-1910
Material
glass: transparent
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1
Length
16.4 cm
Width
9.0 cm
Depth
7.5 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Shows wear and interior with minor residue
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Documents Book Internet
Reference Comments
Allison, Eileen Michael. Ceramic Invalid Feeders, Pap Boats, and Baby Bottles of the 19th & Twentieth Century. Canada: E. M. Allison, 1997.; American Collectors of Infant Feeders
Research Facts
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and sister Alice Roeder, a retired nurse. The collection consists of various eras and types of invalid / infant feeders, infant milk bottles, medicine spoons, urinals and reference material.
Names associated with this item include: baby bottle, nurser, infant nursing bottle, antique baby bottles, glass baby Bottles, milk bottles, Victorian, Victorian baby, Victorian baby feeding bottle
The design of glass baby feeding bottles from 1860-1900 were hard to clean due to the glass screw or cork closures and long rubber tubes ending with rubber teats. This bottle design allowed the infant to self-feed.
This innovation freed the mother from the hassle and discomfort of nursing and wearing a nursing corset, and allowed her the opportunity to tend to her other chores (this was particularly useful for those members of the middle to lower classes who needed to work). A contributing factor to the deadly growth of bacteria throughout the bottle design was that these bottles were not sterilized, only washed every two or three weeks.
This lack of sanitation allowed for deadly bacteria to flourish, and lead to doctors condemning the use of these bottles – now nicknamed ‘Murder Bottles’ – as they contributed to the high infant mortality rates of the late 1800s (only two out of ten babies would survived until two years of age).
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infant feeding bottle

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact14441
Dates
1891
1910
circa 1891-1910
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Pediatrics
Home Health Care
Classification
Pediatrics
Paediatrics
Home Health Care
Accession Number
016001059
Description
Purple tinged clear glass 'turtle' shaped infant feeding bottle with rounded bottom and angled neck for cork or rubber teat closure; visible mould line around edges; hand blown glass; front flat area with embossed product name; measurement gradations on front cork in valve opening with minor miss…
  1 image  
Accession Number
016001059
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Pediatrics
Home Health Care
Classification
Pediatrics
Paediatrics
Home Health Care
MeSH Heading
Pediatrics
Infant Care
Infant Food
Nursing Care
Nursing Care -- instrumentation
Description
Purple tinged clear glass 'turtle' shaped infant feeding bottle with rounded bottom and angled neck for cork or rubber teat closure; visible mould line around edges; hand blown glass; front flat area with embossed product name; measurement gradations on front cork in valve opening with minor missing glass around edge.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and Alice Roeder.
Site Made (Country)
England
Dates
1891
1910
circa 1891-1910
Material
glass: transparent
Inscriptions
Embossed on feeder: "FLUID OUNCES // THE BEST // PAT. SEP 1. 91 // THE GOTHAM CO. N.Y."
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1
Length
17.5 cm
Width
9.0 cm
Depth
6.5 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Cork shows wear and missing minor amount; interior with minor residue
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Documents Book Internet
Reference Comments
Allison, Eileen Michael. Ceramic Invalid Feeders, Pap Boats, and Baby Bottles of the 19th & Twentieth Century. Canada: E. M. Allison, 1997.; American Collectors of Infant Feeders
Research Facts
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and sister Alice Roeder, a retired nurse. The collection consists of various eras and types of invalid / infant feeders, infant milk bottles, medicine spoons, urinals and reference material.
Names associated with this item include: baby bottle, nurser, infant nursing bottle, antique baby bottles, glass baby Bottles, milk bottles, Victorian, Victorian baby, Victorian baby feeding bottle
The design of glass baby feeding bottles from 1860-1900 were hard to clean due to the glass screw or cork closures and long rubber tubes ending with rubber teats. This bottle design allowed the infant to self-feed.
This innovation freed the mother from the hassle and discomfort of nursing and wearing a nursing corset, and allowed her the opportunity to tend to her other chores (this was particularly useful for those members of the middle to lower classes who needed to work). A contributing factor to the deadly growth of bacteria throughout the bottle design was that these bottles were not sterilized, only washed every two or three weeks.
This lack of sanitation allowed for deadly bacteria to flourish, and lead to doctors condemning the use of these bottles – now nicknamed ‘Murder Bottles’ – as they contributed to the high infant mortality rates of the late 1800s (only two out of ten babies would survived until two years of age).
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infant feeding bottle

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact14440
Dates
1880
1910
circa 1880-1910
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Pediatrics
Home Health Care
Classification
Pediatrics
Paediatrics
Home Health Care
Accession Number
016001060 a-b
Description
Two piece clear glass 'turtle' shaped infant feeding bottle (a) with separate clear glass screw (b) with centre hole for rubber tube, tube missing; squared off bottom with angled neck threaded to receive screw closure; visible mould line around edges; hand blown glass; front flat area with embosse…
  1 image  
Accession Number
016001060 a-b
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Pediatrics
Home Health Care
Classification
Pediatrics
Paediatrics
Home Health Care
MeSH Heading
Pediatrics
Infant Care
Infant Food
Nursing Care
Nursing Care -- instrumentation
Description
Two piece clear glass 'turtle' shaped infant feeding bottle (a) with separate clear glass screw (b) with centre hole for rubber tube, tube missing; squared off bottom with angled neck threaded to receive screw closure; visible mould line around edges; hand blown glass; front flat area with embossed product name.
Number Of Parts
2
Part Names
a - bottle
b - screw
Provenance
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and Alice Roeder.
Site Made (Country)
England
Dates
1880
1910
circa 1880-1910
Material
glass: transparent
Inscriptions
Embossed on feeder: "IMPROVED // FEEDING BOTTLE"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1
Length
a - 15.7 cm
b - 3.1 cm
Width
a - 10.0 cm
Depth
a - 7.5 cm
Diameter
b - 3.3 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Documents Book Internet
Reference Comments
Allison, Eileen Michael. Ceramic Invalid Feeders, Pap Boats, and Baby Bottles of the 19th & Twentieth Century. Canada: E. M. Allison, 1997.; American Collectors of Infant Feeders
Research Facts
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and sister Alice Roeder, a retired nurse. The collection consists of various eras and types of invalid / infant feeders, infant milk bottles, medicine spoons, urinals and reference material.
Names associated with this item include: baby bottle, nurser, infant nursing bottle, antique baby bottles, glass baby Bottles, milk bottles, Victorian, Victorian baby, Victorian baby feeding bottle
The design of glass baby feeding bottles from 1860-1900 were hard to clean due to the glass screw or cork closures and long rubber tubes ending with rubber teats. This bottle design allowed the infant to self-feed.
This innovation freed the mother from the hassle and discomfort of nursing and wearing a nursing corset, and allowed her the opportunity to tend to her other chores (this was particularly useful for those members of the middle to lower classes who needed to work). A contributing factor to the deadly growth of bacteria throughout the bottle design was that these bottles were not sterilized, only washed every two or three weeks.
This lack of sanitation allowed for deadly bacteria to flourish, and lead to doctors condemning the use of these bottles – now nicknamed ‘Murder Bottles’ – as they contributed to the high infant mortality rates of the late 1800s (only two out of ten babies would survived until two years of age).
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infant feeding bottle

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact14438
Dates
1945
1955
circa 1945-1955
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Pediatrics
Home Health Care
Classification
Pediatrics
Paediatrics
Home Health Care
Accession Number
016001063 a-d
Description
Clear glass 'banana' style 'Grip-tight' infant feeder (a) with open ends for rubber teat (c) and rubber valve (d) at opposite ends in original product box (b); orange rubber valve and teat with stamped product name; box with drawing of naked infant on pillow and bottle sowing placement of teat and …
  1 image  
Accession Number
016001063 a-d
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Pediatrics
Home Health Care
Classification
Pediatrics
Paediatrics
Home Health Care
MeSH Heading
Pediatrics
Infant Care
Infant Food
Nursing Care
Nursing Care -- instrumentation
Description
Clear glass 'banana' style 'Grip-tight' infant feeder (a) with open ends for rubber teat (c) and rubber valve (d) at opposite ends in original product box (b); orange rubber valve and teat with stamped product name; box with drawing of naked infant on pillow and bottle sowing placement of teat and valve includes instructions.
Number Of Parts
4
Part Names
a - bottle
b - box
c - rubber teat
d - ruber valve
Provenance
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and Alice Roeder.
Maker
Grip-tight
Site Made (Country)
England
Dates
1945
1955
circa 1945-1955
Material
glass: transparent
paper: white
ink: turquoise, ornage, yellow, black
rubber: tan
Inscriptions
Embossed on bottle: "Grip-tight"; printed on box: "Grip-tight / FEEDER // fluid ounces // HEAT STERILISING in the following way will not harm the bottle: place // the feeder in a saucepan of cold // water, which should then be boiled for about five minutes. // FEEDTEATS and VALVES // ARE EXCEPTIONALLY LONG LASTING // AWARDED DIPLOMA OF THE ROYAL INSTITUTE OF PUBLIC HEALTH AND HYGIENE // Atomspheric and other influences may effect the sizes and the functioning of the // feed hole in the teat and the air vent in the valve. // If the food does not flow satisfactorily, remove the valve periodically for a few moments to admit air, but if this is not effective enlarge the feed hole in the following way: // Fix the teat on a feeder which then place on a table; secure a cork on the eye end of a thin needle, the point of which should be then made red-hot; quickly and // carefully insert the red-hot point into the hole of the teat and withdraw promptly. // the bottle shoudl be kept steady and the right arm holding the needle should // be supported on some object of convenient height and size. // MADE IN ENGLAND // COMPLETE // WITH TEAT // AND VALVE"; printed on rubber items: "Grip-tight // MADE IN ENGLAND"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1
Length
a - 18.6 cm
b - 19.3 cm
c - 4.3 cm
d - 2.3 cm
Width
a - 7.8 cm
b - 7.0 cm
Depth
a - 5.6 cm
b - 7.0 cm
Diameter
c - 2.0 cm
d - 2.1 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Documents Book Internet
Reference Comments
Allison, Eileen Michael. Ceramic Invalid Feeders, Pap Boats, and Baby Bottles of the 19th & Twentieth Century. Canada: E. M. Allison, 1997.; American Collectors of Infant Feeders
Research Facts
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and sister Alice Roeder, a retired nurse. The collection consists of various eras and types of invalid / infant feeders, infant milk bottles, medicine spoons, urinals and reference material.
Names associated with this item include: baby bottle, nurser, infant nursing bottle, antique baby bottles, glass baby Bottles, milk bottles, Victorian, Victorian baby, Victorian baby feeding bottle
Though the ‘Murder Bottle’ design of early glass and rubber infant feeders were unsanitary was outlawed by Buffalo, New York by 1897, they continued to be bought and used widely into the 1920s. A new elongated baby bottle with openings on both end of the bottle was created in 1894 called the ‘Banana Bottle’ or ‘The Allenbury Feeder’ that was easier to clean. It has been referred to as a ‘saviour’ due to it being the most hygienic bottle design on the market at the time, and was used into the 1950s.
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infant feeding bottle

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact12176
Dates
1890
1900
circa 1890-1900
Collection
Kit Wheeler Collection
Category
Pediatrics
Home Health Care
Classification
Pediatrics
Paediatrics
Home Health Care
Accession Number
003042002 a-b
Description
Clear glass oval 'turtle-shaped' infant feeding bottle (a) with removeable glass screw cap (b) with opening for tube insertion; tube missing; embossed manufacturer's information on top; mould lines along sides.
  3 images  
Accession Number
003042002 a-b
Collection
Kit Wheeler Collection
Category
Pediatrics
Home Health Care
Classification
Pediatrics
Paediatrics
Home Health Care
MeSH Heading
Feeding Methods
Infant Food
Infant Nutrition
Bottle Feeding -- instrumentation
Pediatrics -- instrumentation
MM= Bottle Feeding -- bottle
Description
Clear glass oval 'turtle-shaped' infant feeding bottle (a) with removeable glass screw cap (b) with opening for tube insertion; tube missing; embossed manufacturer's information on top; mould lines along sides.
Number Of Parts
2
Part Names
a - bottle
b - screw cap
Provenance
Used by Kit Wheeler's father in Belfast, Ireland circa 1898.
Maker
W. R. H. Orr Druggist
Dates
1890
1900
circa 1890-1900
Material
glass: transparent
Inscriptions
Embossed on bottle: "W. R. H. ORR // FAMILY DRUGGIST // 98, YORK ROAD"; Embossed on bottom of bottle: "GLASS MADE // ABROAD".
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1-
Length
a - 14.5 cm
Width
a - 9.5 cm
Height
b - 3cm
Depth
a - 5.5 cm
Diameter
b - 3cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Dimension Notes
Length with cap in place: 15.5cm
Condition Remarks
Interior with minor stain
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Person
Book
Reference Comments
Kit Wheeler, donor; Internet: "Pharmaceutical Society of Australia"; Based on The T. Eaton Co. 1901 Catalogue: "Spring and Summer Catalogue (No. 46) p. 119
Research Facts
This style of infant feeders is known as the "turtle shaped, bent neck, long tube bottle typified by the Maws Alexandra Co." and was a well established commercial success for about 20 years. The medical profession had grave doubts about the design since high infant mortality rate was linked with its use, due to bacteria trapped in poorly cleaned rubber feeding tubes and teats.
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infant feeding bottle

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact10646
Dates
1890
1920
circa 1890-1920
Collection
Dennis and Brenda Marsden Collection
Category
Pediatrics
Home Health Care
Classification
Pediatrics
Paediatrics
Home Health Care
Accession Number
003050027
Description
Glass feeding bottle known as a Stork Nurser; moulded in the 'turtle' shape of an oval with a raised, spouted neck extending from one end and another opening at the back and flat back to stand flat; graduated measures along front, visible mould lines along sides.
  2 images  
Accession Number
003050027
Collection
Dennis and Brenda Marsden Collection
Category
Pediatrics
Home Health Care
Classification
Pediatrics
Paediatrics
Home Health Care
MeSH Heading
Feeding Methods
Infant Food
Infant Nutrition
Pediatrics -- instrumentation
Bottle Feeding -- instrumentation
MM= Bottle Feeding -- bottle
Description
Glass feeding bottle known as a Stork Nurser; moulded in the 'turtle' shape of an oval with a raised, spouted neck extending from one end and another opening at the back and flat back to stand flat; graduated measures along front, visible mould lines along sides.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Found in the donors' basement after they bought the house.
Maker
Stork
Dates
1890
1920
circa 1890-1920
Date Remarks
Very similar to 1991.14.1 which is dated circa 1890
Material
glass: transparent
Inscriptions
Embossed on the top; "STORK NURSER"; 1-8 embossed down center
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1-
Length
17.5 cm
Width
8.5 cm
Depth
6.0 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Minor scratches; rough areas on surface adjacent to smaller opening
Reference Types
Book
Other
Reference Comments
1991.14.1; Kingston City Directories
Research Facts
Found in a cabinet in the donors' basement after they bought the house from John Briscoe of Briscoe's pharmacy which was located at 229 Princess Street in Kingston from 1954 to 1966; it is likely that Briscoe acquired the collection during his career as a pharmacist.
John Briscoe took over Bishop's Drugs Ltd in 1954; Bishop owned another store at 528 Princess Street from 1946 to 1954 and it had been a drug store under other ownership from 1923 until 1946; this is a possible origin of some of the collection.
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infant feeding bottle

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact973
Dates
1891
1920
circa 1891-1920
Collection
Rob and Mary Alice Snetsinger Collection
Category
Pediatrics
Home Health Care
Classification
Pediatrics
Paediatrics
Home Health Care
Accession Number
996024001
Description
Glass infant feeding bottle known as the Best feeding bottle; moulded in the 'turtle' shape of an oval with a raised, spouted neck extending from one end and another opening at the back and flat back to stand flat; graduated measures along front centre, visible mould lines along sides embossed text…
  5 images  
Accession Number
996024001
Collection
Rob and Mary Alice Snetsinger Collection
Category
Pediatrics
Home Health Care
Classification
Pediatrics
Paediatrics
Home Health Care
MeSH Heading
Feeding Methods
Infant Food
Infant Nutrition
Pediatrics -- instrumentation
Bottle Feeding -- instrumentation
MM= Bottle Feeding -- bottle
Description
Glass infant feeding bottle known as the Best feeding bottle; moulded in the 'turtle' shape of an oval with a raised, spouted neck extending from one end and another opening at the back and flat back to stand flat; graduated measures along front centre, visible mould lines along sides embossed text of measurements and name of product.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Owned by Rob and Mary Alice Snetsinger; came from Dr. Harold Stewart's home at 288 Colingwood Street, Kingston, Ontario.
Maker
The Gotham Co. N. Y.
Site Made (State)
New York
Site Made (Country)
United States of America
Dates
1891
1920
circa 1891-1920
Date Remarks
Patent listed as Sept. 1 / 91
Material
glass: transparent
Inscriptions
Embossed on top: "FLUID OUNCES // THE BEST // PAT. SEP 1 91 // THE GOTHAM Co N Y"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1-
Length
16.1 cm
Width
9.3 cm
Depth
6.5 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Jan. 27, 2004: glass cloudy, some stains and occlusions, some nicks; Mar. 17, 1997: the bottle has no chips, cracks or breaks in the glass; there is no excessive wear; the inside of the glass is slightly cloudy
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Document
Reference Comments
Sears, Roebuck & Co. Catalogue
Exhibit History
On exhibit in Paediatric case in Museum, Nov. 21 1997-Jan. 2004
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infant feeding bottle

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact14437
Dates
1880
1910
circa 1880-1910
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Pediatrics
Home Health Care
Classification
Pediatrics
Paediatrics
Home Health Care
Accession Number
016001061 a-b
Description
Two piece clear glass 'turtle' shaped infant feeding bottle (a) with separate clear glass screw (b) with centre hole for rubber tube, tube missing; squared off bottom with angled neck threaded to receive screw; visible mould line around edges; embossed lines to indicate mesurements in tablespoons …
  2 images  
Accession Number
016001061 a-b
Collection
Roeder and Szuck Collection
Category
Pediatrics
Home Health Care
Classification
Pediatrics
Paediatrics
Home Health Care
MeSH Heading
Pediatrics
Infant Care
Infant Food
Nursing Care
Nursing Care -- instrumentation
Description
Two piece clear glass 'turtle' shaped infant feeding bottle (a) with separate clear glass screw (b) with centre hole for rubber tube, tube missing; squared off bottom with angled neck threaded to receive screw; visible mould line around edges; embossed lines to indicate mesurements in tablespoons up to 18; front flat area with circular embossed product name.
Number Of Parts
2
Part Names
a - bottle
b - screw
Provenance
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and Alice Roeder.
Site Made (Country)
England
Dates
1880
1910
circa 1880-1910
Material
glass: transparent
Inscriptions
Embossed on feeder: "THE PRINCESS OF WALES FEEDING BOTTLE // MADE IN ENGLAND // TABLESPOONS"
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1
Length
a - 13.7 cm
b - 3.1 cm
Width
a - 10.0 cm
Depth
a - 7.5 cm
Diameter
b - 3.3 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Copy Type
original
Reference Types
Documents Book Internet
Reference Comments
Allison, Eileen Michael. Ceramic Invalid Feeders, Pap Boats, and Baby Bottles of the 19th & Twentieth Century. Canada: E. M. Allison, 1997.; American Collectors of Infant Feeders
Research Facts
Collected by Maryanne Szuck and sister Alice Roeder, a retired nurse. The collection consists of various eras and types of invalid / infant feeders, infant milk bottles, medicine spoons, urinals and reference material.
The design of glass baby feeding bottles from 1860-1900 were hard to clean due to the glass screw or cork closures and long rubber tubes ending with rubber teats. This bottle design allowed the infant to self-feed.
This innovation freed the mother from the hassle and discomfort of nursing and wearing a nursing corset, and allowed her the opportunity to tend to her other chores (this was particularly useful for those members of the middle to lower classes who needed to work). A contributing factor to the deadly growth of bacteria throughout the bottle design was that these bottles were not sterilized, only washed every two or three weeks.
This lack of sanitation allowed for deadly bacteria to flourish, and lead to doctors condemning the use of these bottles – now nicknamed ‘Murder Bottles’ – as they contributed to the high infant mortality rates of the late 1800s (only two out of ten babies would survived until two years of age).
Exhibit History
On display for exhibit "Gananoque 150" L-2017-6 at Arthur Child Heritage Museum; 24 April 2017 - 26 Aug 2017
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infant feeding bottle

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact8712
Dates
1910
1915
circa 1910-1915
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Pediatrics
Home Health Care
Classification
Pediatrics
Paediatrics
Home Health Care
Accession Number
1991.4.1
Description
Clear cylindrical moulded glass cow milk bottle with embossed inscriptions on two sides; graduated from 8 to 1 with 1/2-oz. marks; opening at one end with wide lip and circular base at opposite end; mould lines and seed bubbles visible.
  3 images  
Accession Number
1991.4.1
Collection
University Health Network - Academy of Medicine Collection
Category
Pediatrics
Home Health Care
Classification
Pediatrics
Paediatrics
Home Health Care
MeSH Heading
Feeding Methods
Infant Food
Bottle Feeding -- instrumentation
MM= Bottle Feeding -- bottle
Pediatrics -- instrumentation
Household Products
Hospitalization
Child Nutrition
Infant Nutrition
Description
Clear cylindrical moulded glass cow milk bottle with embossed inscriptions on two sides; graduated from 8 to 1 with 1/2-oz. marks; opening at one end with wide lip and circular base at opposite end; mould lines and seed bubbles visible.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Acquired from the Academy of Medicine; source: Dr. F. Weinberg.
Site Made (City)
Toronto
Site Made (State)
Ontario
Site Made (Country)
Canada
Dates
1910
1915
circa 1910-1915
Date Remarks
1911 Hospital for Sick Children Annual Report
Material
glass: transparent
Inscriptions
Embossed on one side: "HOSPITAL // FOR SICK CHILDREN // TORONTO // PASTEURIZED MILK" and on the other side, "OUNCES" with graduations.
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1-
Length
17.1 cm
Diameter
5.2 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Dec. 6, 2016: cloudy, abraded area on top surface above "HOSPITAL"; a few bubbles / flaws in glass
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Internet
Reference Comments
http://scans.library.utoronto.ca/pdf/4/1/36reporthospital00hospuoft/36reporthospital00hospuoft.pdf
http://heritagetoronto.org/milk-pasteurization-at-sick-kids/
Research Facts
Bought by donor from a workman who found this bottle and several others in a waste site while excavating for building the Sky Dome in the late 1980s.
Hospital for Sick Children Toronto supplied pasteurized cow milk to mothers at its clinic / entrance at Elizabeth and College Streets, ca. 1910-1915. "THE MILK SUPPLY. The Pasteurization Plant has now been in complete working order for the past two years, all milk used being scientifically pasteurized in our Laboratory. During the year 72 gallons of milk were daily pasteurized for in-patients and 602 bottles of baby food prepared for outside babies—a daily average of 60 babies. The milk used in the Hospital for the patients and the staff is all pasteurized." From 1911 Annual Report
See Heritage Toronto article regarding bottles produced by the Hospital for Sick Chldren. John Ross Robertson, benefactor of the Hospital, announced he would build a pasteurization plant for the Hospital in 1908. In 1909 a temporary location was set up on Elizabeth Street, The purpose-built facility at 54 LaPlante Ave. opened in January 1914. Milk was dispensed to the public and bottles were returned (the Hospital had its own bottles, and to encourage their return, the bottoms were rounded, making it impossible to stand them up). In April 1914, Toronto passed a law requiring all milk to be pasteurized. The Hospital for Sick Children stopped most pasteurization operations by 1928.
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infant feeding bottle

https://mhc.andornot.com/en/permalink/artifact12175
Dates
1895
1930
circa 1900-1930
Collection
Kit Wheeler Collection
Category
Pediatrics
Home Health Care
Classification
Pediatrics
Paediatrics
Home Health Care
Accession Number
003042001
Description
Clear moulded glass double opening 'banana' - shaped infant feeding bottle, with one end bent up, and flat base to keep it stable on a surface; graduated scale on reverse side; originally would include a rubber teat at one opening, and a rubber valve at the other opening (both missing); embossed te…
  5 images  
Accession Number
003042001
Collection
Kit Wheeler Collection
Category
Pediatrics
Home Health Care
Classification
Pediatrics
Paediatrics
Home Health Care
MeSH Heading
Feeding Methods
Infant Food
Infant Nutrition
Bottle Feeding -- instrumentation
Pediatrics -- instrumentation
MM= Bottle Feeding -- bottle
Description
Clear moulded glass double opening 'banana' - shaped infant feeding bottle, with one end bent up, and flat base to keep it stable on a surface; graduated scale on reverse side; originally would include a rubber teat at one opening, and a rubber valve at the other opening (both missing); embossed text on reverse are faint in some areas.
Number Of Parts
1
Provenance
Used by Kit Wheeler's father in Belfast, Ireland circa 1898.
Maker
Allen & Hanburys Co. Ltd.
Site Made (City)
London
Site Made (Country)
United Kingdom
Dates
1895
1930
circa 1900-1930
Date Remarks
Based on donor's remarks
Material
glass: transparent
Inscriptions
Embossed on bottle front: "The // "Allenburys" // Feeder"; on back: "OUNCES 149 // TABLESPOONS REC.N"; " 0690/23/1359
Permanent Location
Storage Room 0010
0010-D1-
Length
17.0 cm
Width
7.2 cm
Depth
6.3 cm
Unit Of Measure
centimeters
Condition Remarks
Like new
Copy Type
Original
Reference Types
Person
Internet
Reference Comments
Kit Wheeler, donor; Internet: "Pharmaceutical Society of Australia"
Research Facts
Allen & Hanburys were relative latecomers into the feeding bottle market. Their first feeder was an innovative design when introduced in 1895 with features drawn from several sources. The new boat shaped bottle had a wide bent up neck fitted with a pull over teat and a lower opening that protruded the bottle slightly from the body was fitted with a vented rubber plug. The four advantages of the new bottle were listed as: graduations to measure the food; no angular corners to facilitate easier cleaning; no long tube to breed germs and an effective valve to regulate the air flow and prevent colic.
Allen & Hanburys, a UK pharmaceutical company established in 1715, also produced infant foods and feeding equipment between 1879 and 1958.
Information on how to prepare ”Allenbury’s Milk Food, attaching teats to and cleaning the ‘Allenbury’s Feeder’ bottle can be found in 009.021.005 ‘Infant Feeding and Management’ by Allen & Hanburys Ltd. April 1923.
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35 records – page 1 of 2.